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Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
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Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility

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By Diego Monraz Villasenor. Presented at Day One of Transforming Transportation 2010. Washington, D.C. January 14, 2010.

By Diego Monraz Villasenor. Presented at Day One of Transforming Transportation 2010. Washington, D.C. January 14, 2010.

Published in: Business, Technology
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  • 1.  
  • 2. Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility
  • 3. • According to the Financial Times is the American city with the biggest future potencial. • Host of the 16th Panamerican Games to take place in 2011. • Bicentennial of the Mexican Independence, on September 16th 2011. • Birthplace of the most important mexican symbols, such as Mariachi and Tequila. Guadalajara, Jalisco, México
  • 4. • There are 4.3 million inhabitants in the Guadalajara Metropolitan Area (7 million people in Jalisco). • There are 1.7 million vehicles at any given time in the city’s streets , with 378 new vehicles being added every day. • There are 5 ,000 units in the conventional public transportation system. • There are 15 miles of Light Railway, divided into 2 lines (1989). • There are 10 miles in the 1st. phase of Macrobús (March, 2009 ). Current Situation in Guadalajara
  • 5. Public Involvement • The success of a project like Macrobús is due to, the strategy of Social Efford. • On the different phases of Macrobús, we are sharing with all the habitants that are close to the physical project, the advantages that this transportation system is going to bring to them, the time frame, the implications and function; through this permanent and open dialogue, we are also trying to resolve all doubts that could be to this. • With an socially active and commited participation with the city, the results of this process would be the union of the efforts between society and government to recover the City through the Urban Mobility.
  • 6. Phase I: Independence Corridor February 29, 2008: construction of the corridor is started March 10, 2009: Phase I of Macrobús starts operations • 600 million pesos in infrastructure investment • 10 miles of trunk busways • 27 stations and 2 terminals • 15 feeder lines • 41 articulated buses • 103 feeder line buses • 125 thousand users per day  
  • 7. Social Awareness Management Independencia Corridor <ul><li>Information visits to 90 thousand households in 40 districts along the corridor’s 10 miles. </li></ul><ul><li>Flyer and water bottle handouts at crossings during construction phase on Independencia Avenue. </li></ul><ul><li>- 16 week-long preventive information campaign prior to modifications in 126 existing public transportation routes. </li></ul><ul><li>- Specific work with vulnerable social groups and project presentations in schools along the corridor. </li></ul><ul><li>- Special communication and user - information activities during mass events both before and after startup of Macrobús operations. </li></ul>
  • 8. Civilian Groups Support Guadalajara 2020 A.C. Colectivo Ecologista Jalisco A.C. Centro de Transporte Sustentable (CTS) / Embarq Co.
  • 9. New Management SYSTEM STANDARD Controlling Organism Operators Trunk and Feeder lines Legal Framework for Public Transportation Concessions Technical Fare Development Shareholders Composition - Macrobús S. A. de C. V. : 92% - 555 associates of Alianza de Camioneros S. A. de C. V. 4% - 27 partners of Articulados de Guadalajara S. A. de C. V. 4% - 27 partners of Subrogado de Sistecozome Services
  • 10. Phase II Tonalá Zapopan New Bus Station Benito Juárez Hall <ul><ul><ul><li>• 2 0 miles of trunk busways </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>• 214 thousand users per day </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>• 75 articulated buses and 200 feeder line buses </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>• 43 stations, 14 will be Express </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 11. • 30,000 visited properties in North Zapopan, in the district of Tesistán, South Tlaquepaque and Tonalá in some of their main neighborhoods, like in the New Bus Station. • 30 pro neighborhoods; are still integrating more community leaders. • Visits to the more important institutions like educational, industrial, commercial, health and some religious, that are part of the same point north and south of the route. • Providing assistance to demonstrators against the Macrobús in Tesistán and in Downtown. Social Awareness Management Phase II
  • 12. 2007 Total: 22.3 miles 200 thousand users per day LIGHT RAILWAY # LINE LENGTH (Miles) 1 I 9.6 2 II 5.3 4 PRE TREN 7.4 TOTAL Miles: 22.3
  • 13. 2009 Total: 33.3 miles 330 thousand users per day MACROBÚS CORRIDOR LENGTHS PHASES I, II, III and IV # PHASE NAME LENGTH (Miles) 1 PHASE I CUAAD - FRAY ANGÉLICO 10 TOTAL Miles: 10 LIGHT RAILWAY # LINE LENGTH (Miles) 1 I 9.6 2 II 5.3 4 PRE TREN 7.4 TOTAL Miles: 22.3
  • 14. 2012 Total: 81.5 miles 1 million users per day MACROBÚS CORRIDOR LENGTHS PHASES I, II, III and IV # PHASE NAME LENGTH (Miles) 1 PHASE I CUAAD - FRAY ANGÉLICO 10 2 PHASE II ZAPOPAN - NEW BUS STATION 20 3 PHASE III JUAN PABLO II & RING ROAD –EL ÁLAMO TRAFFIC CIRCLE 8 4 PHASE IV EL ÁLAMO TRAFFIC CIRCLE – AIRPORT– EL SALTO CORRIDOR 11 TOTAL Miles: 49 LIGHT RAILWAY # LINE LENGTH (Miles) 1 I 9.6 2 II 5.3 3 III 10.2 4 PRE TREN 7.4 TOTAL Miles: 32.5
  • 15. Towards Sustainable Urban Mobility

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