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Transport Data and Indicators

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By Lee Schipper, Stanford University. Transforming Transportation 2011. Washington, D.C. January 27, 2011.

By Lee Schipper, Stanford University. Transforming Transportation 2011. Washington, D.C. January 27, 2011.

Published in: Business, Technology
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    • 1. Transport Data Lee Schipper Project Scientist Global Metropolitan Studies And Senior Research Engineer Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Stanford University *based on work by Schipper, Fabian, Leather, Ng and Gota for Asian Development Bank, 2009 and Schipper, Marie and Gorham 2000 (W Bank) Transport Data and Indicators What We Need To Know and Why*
    • 2. First Approach to Understanding Transport: ASIF” Decomposition: “ Flexing the Link Between CO2 and Urban Transport” Schipper et al. World Bank 1998, 2000 Air pollution, health impacts Global CO2 Transport Data
    • 3. Impact of Intervention: Difference Between BAU (no intervention) and Actual Transport Data Time Transport Activity or Emissions Original Baseline Before & after intervention Difference between with & with-out intervention Revised Actual: Second intervention?
    • 4. “ Peak Travel?”: Driving and Per Capita GDP 1970 -2008. Who Tracks These Data for Developing Countries? Source, L Schipper,based on official national data
    • 5. On Road Fuel Economy in IEA Countries, All Fuels at CO2 Equivalent Why is Schipper the only one Tracking These?
    • 6. Transport Data and Indicators What We Need To Know and Why
      • The Basics – Few Developing Countries Track Accurately
        • Numbers of vehicles in use, vehicle-km by vehicle and fuel
        • Passenger km by mode (NMT, car, taxi, 2-wheel, bus, informal, rail, air; urban and non-urban)
        • Tonne-km by mode (NMT, local truck/delivery, intercity truck, rail, etc
      • The Institutional Problems – Money and Know-How
        • Fuel, road, household, emissions data spread over silo-ed authorities
        • Little track record for cooperation among authorities, private sector, etc
        • Few institutions teaching broad class of transport/environment/economic skills
      • Bright Lights
        • Local efforts- Mexico City, Sao Paolo, Santiago (plagued by dirty air)
        • IEA country regular survey efforts – Australia, France
        • IEA country massage efforts – Germany, Japan, UK, US (bottom of list)
      Transport Data With Today’s Poor Data, Impacts of Policies and Technologies to Reduce CO2 in Rapidly Growing Countries Invisible
    • 7. Data and Indicators: Methodological Criteria Most International Data Sets Flunk ACCURACY COMPARABILITY AMONG REGIONS AND OVER TIME FREQUENCY AND REPEATABILITY TRANSPARENCY MEASURABILITY USEFUL DATA AND INDICATORS Transport Data
    • 8. Transport Data and Indicators Specific Problems
      • The US is a Good Example of a Bad Example
        • Last household vehicle survey with fuel diaries - 1985
        • Last truck use survey died in 2002
        • Last complete national travel survey 2001
      • Commonly Used and Abused Data sets
        • “ Millenium Cities” – not replicable, not transparent, not comparable, expensive
        • EU/Ademe “Odyssey” - not comparable with national data, expensive
        • EU/Eur Env Agency transport data – too aggregate
      • Most Common Problems
        • “ Passenger Road Transport” not defined by mode or urban/rural (e.g., Mexico, India, China)
        • Fuel use not split by fuel, vehicle type, and mode
        • Studies claiming to do “ASIF”/Kaya decomposition with such “data”
      Transport Data You Can’t Master What You Can’t Measure These Data are Needed for Mastering Transport and Environment
    • 9. Lee Schipper – schipper@ berkeley.edu Transport Data Until we can see, Let us march forward happily ありがとうございます 谢谢 Merci Gracias Thank you

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