Safe Access for MRTS in Indian Cities

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Safe Access for MRTS in Indian Cities

  1. 1. SAFE ACCESS FOR TRANSIT Principles for Indian Cities Binoy Mascarenhas Manager – Urban Transport EMBARQ India
  2. 2. What is safe access to transit? Ensures the safe movement of people to and from transit stations Covers all mode of access with appropriate priority: walking, bicycling, IPT, public transport , etc. For people of all ability: senior citizens, physically challenged etc. Includes access to ancillary transit facilities – conveniences, street- vending, public spaces, shopping, parking etc. Ensures other co-benefits: shorter travel time, ease of transfer, comfort, convenience, etc. 2
  3. 3. Barriers in the Urban Indian Context Over-saturated infrastructure; Encroachments on the right of way No integration of feeder services No defined movement paths: free for all Stations adjacent to major highway corridors (high speed / high volume of through traffic) Large blocks / poor local connectivity 3Photo: EMBARQ India
  4. 4. Barriers in the Urban Indian Context Over-saturated infrastructure, Encroachments on the right of way; Obstacles & obstructions No integration of feeder services No defined movement paths: free for all Stations adjacent to major highway corridors (high speed / high volume of through traffic) Large blocks / poor local connectivity 4Photo: EMBARQ India
  5. 5. Barriers in the Urban Indian Context Over-saturated infrastructure, Encroachments on the right of way; Obstacles & obstructions No integration of feeder services No defined movement paths: free for all Stations adjacent to major highway corridors (high speed / high volume of through traffic) Large blocks / poor local connectivity 5Photo: EMBARQ India
  6. 6. PRINCIPLES OF SAFE ACCESS 6
  7. 7. 7 Scale 1: City level City-wide continuous NMT networks Pedestrian priority zones for district centers Channel motorized traffic and calm residential areas 7 Pedestrian Plan for Zurich (2004) Source: City of Zurich, Dept. of Civil Engineering
  8. 8. 8 Scale 2: Neighbourhood level Multiple levels – pedestrian level, NMT level, feeder service level Different design principles for each zone. 8 Regulatory Plan for Indiranagar Metro Station Area Source: EMBARQ India
  9. 9. 9 Scale 2: Neighbourhood level 9 HSR NIP along Outer Ring Road BRT Source: EMBARQ India For Midblock For Intersections 3m clear walkway 2m clear walkway Recreational route Signalized pedestrian crossings Pavement bulb-outs & zebra crossings Raised mid block crossings
  10. 10. 10 Scale 3: Corridor level Road Design Practices Source: EMBARQ India Footpath width conducive to demand – continuous, consistent, uninterrupted
  11. 11. 11 Scale 3: Corridor level 11 Road Design Practices Source: EMBARQ IndiaSource: EMBARQ India At-grade crossing with speed and traffic calming elements
  12. 12. 12 Scale 3: Corridor level 12 Road Design Practices Source: EMBARQ India Tighter corner kerb radii at intersections Source: EMBARQ India
  13. 13. 13 Scale 3: Corridor level 13 Road Design Practices Source: EMBARQ India Road Diet for maximizing footpath and buffer zone for ancillary activities
  14. 14. 14 Scale 3: Corridor level 14 Road Design Practices Source: EMBARQ India Road Diet for maximizing footpath and buffer zone for ancillary activities
  15. 15. 15 Scale 3: Corridor level 15 Provision for ancillary street uses Source: EMBARQ India Wasted area – neither needed for thoroughfare traffic nor by pedestrians Left unused, prone to encroachment
  16. 16. 16 Scale 3: Corridor level 16 Provision for ancillary street uses Source: EMBARQ India Creating a multi-utility zone through limited and consistent carriageway Min 2.5 m : Footpath Multi-utility zone 7.5 m : Carriageway 7.5 m : Carriageway 3.0 m : Metro column area Min 2.5: Footpath Multi-utility zoneBus Stop Parking / Waiting area Bus Stop Auto rick stand Property Access BUS BAY BUS BAY Vendors EB TB
  17. 17. 17 Scale 3: Corridor level 17 Provision for vending Source: EMBARQ India Vending can be accommodated into the access way through unutilized spaces
  18. 18. 18 Scale 3: Corridor level 18 Smoother feeder integration Priority in proximity from the station Handling conflicting movements; Defined spaces: waiting, queuing, parking Source: EMBARQ India
  19. 19. 19 Scale 3: Corridor level 19 Effective dispersal from stations METRO STATION AREA EXISITING BUS STOP PROPOSED/SHIFTED BUS STOP PROPOSED AUTO PICK UP/DROP OFF 2W PARKING Source: MMRDA SATIS Plan, Mumbai Metro Dispersal into adjacent side streets Direct access to feeder services from side streets
  20. 20. 20 Scale 3: Corridor level 20 Using property frontages effectively Source: EMBARQ India
  21. 21. 21 Scale 3: Corridor level 21 Using property frontages effectively Source: EMBARQ India Creating additional pedestrian paths by absorbing property setbacks through incentives for developers
  22. 22. 22 Scale 3: Corridor level 22 Using skywalks effectively Skywalks are NOT FOBs Skywalks are NOT replacement for footpaths and at-grade crossing Source: EMBARQ India
  23. 23. 23 Scale 3: Corridor level 23 Using skywalks effectively Network of elevated skyways integrated with the station area built-form Source: EMBARQ IndiaSource: EMBARQ India
  24. 24. 24 Scale 3: Corridor level 24 Integrating way-finding and signage Source: EMBARQ India
  25. 25. 25 Enablers for Safe Access 25 The Safe Access Manual Safe Access Approach Pedestrian and Cycling Priority Enhanced Safety and Security Enhanced Public Realm Seamless integration with feeder infrastructure Parking Management Planning Process Implementation Strategies Maintenance Strategies Regulations
  26. 26. THANK YOU! 26

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