Options for South-South      cooperation on transport             NAMA‟s –LargeCommercialVehicles Renovation Experiences  ...
Where do Ifind suitableexperience onTransportNAMA?                Supported by
Here? (Bangalore, India)                   Supported by
Here? (Durban, South Africa)                   Supported by
BackgroundInterest of the Government of Colombia tacklingclimate change and access international support Freight Transport...
Colombia – CurrentSituationFreight  95% is road based  Fleetaverageage: 22 years     71% trucks are 10+ years old     45% ...
Colombia – CurrentSituationUrban Transport                                       Mass Transit 8 Large Cities  Semi-informa...
Colombia –FreightTransportrenovationpro             gram  Established in 2008  New vehicles need to replace old ones or pa...
Key Barriers in the Colombian renovation fleet programs(Lack of) Institutional capacity at the managingagenciesComplex pro...
Mexico – Freight andPassengerTransportrenovationpro   Started in 2008                   gram  Freight vehicles 10+ years  ...
Mexican vsColombianRenovationProgram            s Similar needs – similar problems   Obsolete fleets   Dispersed ownership...
LessonsfromMexico Funding source: Money at front from publicsources Management through a trust fund; use overseveral years...
Where do I find suitableexperience on TransportNAMA?Bilateral agency as anFacilitator, Funder,Enabler (GIZ- BMU – ICI) Loc...
Supported by
Cities with BRT/Bus Corridors25                                                                                           ...
About 120 cities with BRT or bus corridors 4,335 km - 6,683 stations – 30,000 buses   26.8 million passengers per weekday ...
La Asociación Latinoamericana de Sistemas Integrados y BRT (SIBRT) trabaja por el desarrollo y la mejora de la calidad del...
Barriers in south- south        cooperation Lack of funding Lack of programs Examples often North-South  „Northern‟ expert...
Success Factors Countries interestedin apply policies thathave been successfulin countries with thesame type ofdevelopment...
Success FactorsSimilar problems-similar needs: South -southcooperation is veryeffective asconditions,issues, institutional...
OpportunitiesEstablish a south – southknowledge sharingnetworkCreate synergies for thedevelopment of transportNAMAsCreate ...
Thank you for your    attention!Holger DalkmannEmail: hdalkmann@wri.org    Darío Hidalgo Email: DHidalgo@wri.orgHilda Mart...
Questions?        Supported by
Colombia –    UrbanTransportProgramsStrategic Public Transportation Systems (SETP) • Improves public transportation system...
Colombia – Passenger                transport renovations                              programs         Mass Transportatio...
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Options for South-South Cooperation on Transport NAMAs

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By Holger Dalkmann. December 2, 2011. Durban, South Africa.

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Options for South-South Cooperation on Transport NAMAs

  1. 1. Options for South-South cooperation on transport NAMA‟s –LargeCommercialVehicles Renovation Experiences in Colombia and México Holger Dalkmann and Dario Hidalgo EMBARQHilda Martínez, Sayel Cortés, Gabriela Niño EMBARQ-CTS Mexico A GIZ TRANSferProgramStudy Supported by
  2. 2. Where do Ifind suitableexperience onTransportNAMA? Supported by
  3. 3. Here? (Bangalore, India) Supported by
  4. 4. Here? (Durban, South Africa) Supported by
  5. 5. BackgroundInterest of the Government of Colombia tacklingclimate change and access international support Freight Transport in Colombia: 12% of totalemissions, 33% of energy related emissions. Interested in developing a NAMA on the existingfleet replacement program for large commercialvehicles Learn from the experience of other emergingeconomy (Mexico) Existing project enables support (GIZ – BMU – ICI) Supported by
  6. 6. Colombia – CurrentSituationFreight 95% is road based Fleetaverageage: 22 years 71% trucks are 10+ years old 45% trucks are 20+ years old Freight transport 37% oil consumption 2.9 Mton of CO2 (2008) http://images.travelpod.com/tw_slides/ta00/e5d/12c/c- camion-tipico-de-colombia-pereira.jpg Supported by
  7. 7. Colombia – CurrentSituationUrban Transport Mass Transit 8 Large Cities Semi-informal, competition on the street for passengers, poor quality Estimated fleet oversupply 45% Fleet average 10+ years old National programs co-funding urban transport reform in several cities www.mintransporte.gov.co Supported by
  8. 8. Colombia –FreightTransportrenovationpro gram Established in 2008 New vehicles need to replace old ones or pay a “scrapping fee” ~USD 100 million collected (2008 and April, 2011) ~4000 scrapped vehicles http://noticiasrevistanuevomilenio.blogspot.com/2011/08/programa-de- chatarrizacion-de-camiones.html ~46,800 tons/year of CO2 reduced Supported by
  9. 9. Key Barriers in the Colombian renovation fleet programs(Lack of) Institutional capacity at the managingagenciesComplex process, specially difficult for individualowners (majority) Funding depends on new vehicles being added(“scrapping fee”)Leakage due to loopholes in regulation anddifficulties in controlling actual scrapping Supported by
  10. 10. Mexico – Freight andPassengerTransportrenovationpro Started in 2008 gram Freight vehicles 10+ years old and Passenger 8+ years old receive credit for up to 15% to buy a new vehicle 15,050 vehicles scrapped USD 215 million USD Savings ~892 million of liters of http://www.eltotonacapan.com/nota/12835/transporte-pblico-va-sobre- diesel camiones-chatarra.html ~2.25 Mtons of CO2 Supported by
  11. 11. Mexican vsColombianRenovationProgram s Similar needs – similar problems Obsolete fleets Dispersed ownership (one man-one truck/bus) Poor registry Key differences Funding sources: Colombia private, Mexico public Institutional settings: Colombia separate for trucks (national) and buses (local); Mexico common federal program Supported by
  12. 12. LessonsfromMexico Funding source: Money at front from publicsources Management through a trust fund; use overseveral years Improved information and registry: complete database proof of scrapping Registry of new vehicles and its usage (to report actual impacts) Targeting small owners with appropriatefinancial tools Supported by
  13. 13. Where do I find suitableexperience on TransportNAMA?Bilateral agency as anFacilitator, Funder,Enabler (GIZ- BMU – ICI) Local Center with ainternational network(EMBARQ)Policy Maker as keystakeholder (Mexico,Colombia) Supported by
  14. 14. Supported by
  15. 15. Cities with BRT/Bus Corridors25 125 Guanghzhou, Hefei, Yancheng, Zaozhuang -China Jaipur - India; Pelembang, Gorontalo, Surakata - Indonesia20 Bangkok - Thailand; East London Transit - UK 100 João Pessoa - Brazil; Barranquilla, Bucaramanga - Colombia 17 Estado México - México; Lima - Perú; Brampton - Canada 1615 75 13 Bogotá TransMilenio Los Angeles Metrorapid10 50 8 888 Curitiba 7 5 55 4 25 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 11 11 00 0 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Supported by Source: EMBARQ BRT/Bus Corridors Database, January, 2011
  16. 16. About 120 cities with BRT or bus corridors 4,335 km - 6,683 stations – 30,000 buses 26.8 million passengers per weekday 4 11 1 3 9 1 1 16 1 13 1 1 5 1 1 4 1 1 1 5 2 11 16 1 1 4 1 830 6 km 1 km Source: CTS Brasil, EMBARQ BRT/Bus Corridors Database, January, 2011 Supported by
  17. 17. La Asociación Latinoamericana de Sistemas Integrados y BRT (SIBRT) trabaja por el desarrollo y la mejora de la calidad del transporte público urbano en la región. Supported by
  18. 18. Barriers in south- south cooperation Lack of funding Lack of programs Examples often North-South „Northern‟ expertise sometimeshigher valued Supported by
  19. 19. Success Factors Countries interestedin apply policies thathave been successfulin countries with thesame type ofdevelopment. Internationalcooperation agenciesand multilateraldevelopment banksrole as Enabler Supported by
  20. 20. Success FactorsSimilar problems-similar needs: South -southcooperation is veryeffective asconditions,issues, institutionalsettings, barriers andopportunities aresimilar Supported by
  21. 21. OpportunitiesEstablish a south – southknowledge sharingnetworkCreate synergies for thedevelopment of transportNAMAsCreate fundingopportunitiesLeverage funding frommultilateral developmentbanks or internationalcooperation agencies Supported by
  22. 22. Thank you for your attention!Holger DalkmannEmail: hdalkmann@wri.org Darío Hidalgo Email: DHidalgo@wri.orgHilda Martínez Email: hmartinez@ctsmexico.org Supported by
  23. 23. Questions? Supported by
  24. 24. Colombia – UrbanTransportProgramsStrategic Public Transportation Systems (SETP) • Improves public transportation systems in 12 middle-sized cities (250,000-600,000 inhabitants). • Includes restructuring local public transportation and fee collection systems, develop traffic light systems and operation management systems, revise fee calculation methodology and constructing any required infrastructure • Started in 2009 with 7 cities and aprox. 1.1 million USD (76.1% comes from public funding, the rest from private sources). • As part of this program, public transport fleets will be reduced since oversupply has been identified in all cities. Supported by
  25. 25. Colombia – Passenger transport renovations programs Mass Transportation Systems (Sistemas de Transporte Masivos, STM) • Mass Transportation Systems are used to organize transportation in big cities. o Currently working: Bogotá, Pereira, Cali, Barranquilla, Bucamaranga o Under development: Cartagena and Medellín o Planning stage: Cúcuta • The implementation of these systems always includes renovation programs which varies in each city. o As an example, Bogotás Transmilenio system had by 2002 taken out aprox 1,500 vehicles. This number increased to 6,014 by 2009.Sources: • Transmilenio: Sistema Integrado de Transporte Masivo (Bogotá, Colombia). Experiencia seleccionada del Concurso de Buenas Prácticas, 2002. 26-06-2002 http://habitat.aq.upm.es/bpal/onu02/bp129.html consultado 09/11/11. Supported by • EMBARQ, Evaluación Ex-post. Sistema de Transporte Masivo de Bogotá, Fases I y II, Informe 4, Noviembre, 2009

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