Hydration scientific library volume 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Hydration scientific library volume 1

on

  • 249 views

Hydration scientific library volume 1

Hydration scientific library volume 1
http://www.europeanhydrationinstitute.org/

Statistics

Views

Total Views
249
Views on SlideShare
249
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Hydration scientific library volume 1 Hydration scientific library volume 1 Document Transcript

  •       Hydration Scientific Library (Volume 1) Index • Is hydration associated with quality of life? • Hot weather is not always good news • Prevention policy initiatives aimed at encouraging euhydration may have an impact on the health of elderly people • How hydration status affects the diuretic effect of beer  
  • 3. EHI Update: May 2010 · HYDRATION SCIENTIFIC LIBRARY A decline in both physical and mental capacity is an inevitable part of the aging process and this has implications for Quality of Life (QoL) in the elderly. Those in residential care, either for medical reasons or because of the absence of family carers, may be especially vulnerable. This study assessed the relationship between clinical care indicators (CCI) and QoL in 82 residents of four Australian residential care facilities. Standard analytical tools were used for CCI, covering 23 different areas of care, and QoL, which was assessed as a profile of six domains (physical, psychological, independence, social relationships, environmental, and spiritual). The study found, perhaps not surprisingly, that poorer scores in the clinical care indicators adversely influenced QoL. All QoL domains were affected to some degree, with the greatest impact on the social and spiritual domains. Poorer status in hydration, falls and depression were the three factors most strongly associated with lower QoL scores, suggesting those three indicators could represent key areas for clinical management in residential aged care. It is important to recognise that this study does not show that improving the quality of care in these three areas will necessarily improve the quality of life of the elderly living in care. However, improving hydration status does seem to be a low cost intervention that deserves further investigation. Courtney M, M O’Reilly, H Edwards, S Hassall (2009). The relationship between clinical outcomes and quality of life for residents of aged care facilities. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing 26, 49-57 It is important to recognise that this study does not show that improving the quality of care in these three areas will necessarily improve the quality of life of the elderly living in care. However, improving hydration status does seem to be a low cost intervention that deserves further investigation. IS HYDRATION ASSOCIATED WITH QUALITY OF LIFE? a review by Ronald J. Maughan - Chairman of the Science Advisory Board www.europeanhydrationinstitute.org
  • 3. EHI Update: July 2010 · HYDRATION SCIENTIFIC LIBRARY With the arrival of another European summer and the prospect of warm weather conditions it may be wise to reflect on the impact that environmental heat waves can have on the health and wellbeing of the population. Scientific findings from data collected during the summer of 2003 give good insight into potential problems that can occur. Between the 1st and 20th of August 2003, the mean maximum temperature in France exceeded the seasonal norm by 11–12°C on nine consecutive days. The number of deaths observed from August to November 2003 was compared to the number expected on the basis of the mortality rates observed from the years 2000 to 2002 and the 2003 population estimates. The study found that from August 1st to 20th 2003, 15,000 excess deaths were observed and from the age of 35 years, the excess mortality was marked and showed an increase with increasing age. There was also a 15% higher mortality in women than in men of comparable age. Excess mortality occurring at home and in retirement institutions was greater than that occurring in hospitals and the mortality of widowed, single and divorced subjects was greater than that of married people. It is of interest to note that deaths directly related to heat, heatstroke, hyperthermia and dehydration increased massively, but there was also an increase in the number of deaths from causes that might not seem to be directly related to the heat. Similar patterns were observed in several other European countries. It is important to recognise that while the elderly and people living alone are particularly vulnerable to heat waves, no group in the population may be considered completely protected from the risks associated with heat waves, and there was a higher than expected number of fatalities even in the young and apparently healthy. Whilst there are many aspects of warm weather conditions that we cannot control, some simple precautions may reduce the risk of adverse events. Maintaining an appropriate hydration status and making use of cool indoor environments are two such behaviours that should be considered. A. Fouillet, G. Rey, F. Laurent, G. Pavillon, S. Bellec, C. Guihenneuc-Jouyaux, J. Clavel, E. Jougla, D. Hémon (2006), Excess mortality related to the August 2003 heat wave in France. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 80: 16–24 It is of interest to note that deaths directly related to heat, heatstroke, hyperthermia and dehydration increased massively, but there was also an increase in the number of deaths from causes that might not seem to be directly related to the heat. Hot weather is not always good news Dr. Susan Shirreffs www.europeanhydrationinstitute.org
  • 3. EHI Update: October 2010 Data collected after the heat wave occurring in France in August of 2003 showed that elderly people are mostly vulnerable to environmental heat stress; an excess mortality of 55% was observed in comparison to 2000- 2002 in France, 79% of which involved subjects aged 75 and over. Behavioural changes aimed at encouraging euhydration, particularly during heat waves, were promoted by the “National heat wave response plan”, issued by the French government in 2004: environmental conditions are monitored and, during heat waves, drinking of still water and protection from sun and heat are advised, while local and national public services are mobilized to prevent health consequences. The objective of a recent study was to evaluate the impact of behavioural changes proposed by the “National heat wave response plan” on the hydration status of elderly citizens in France. Administrative data on 23,022 inpatients aged over 70 years admitted between 2000 and 2006 at Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France, provided information on vital status at discharge, Charlson comorbidity scores and blood tests within the first 24 h after admission. Plasma tonicity and blood urea nitrogen/creatine (BUNC) ratio were matched with daily temperatures before admission and in-hospital mortality, thus allowing the evaluation of changes in hydration profiles and in-hospital mortality 3 years before and after the 2003 heat wave. The main study results showed that, after adjusting for gender, age, Charlson comorbidity index and daily temperatures, the risk of having plasma tonicity higher than 300 mOsm/l, a value reflecting body water deficit, had increased in 2003 and decreased in 2004-2006, with reference to 2000-2002. However, the risk of having plasma tonicity lower than 275 mOsm/l, a value reflecting body water excess, increased in 2004-2006. Unexpectedly, the risk of having BUNC ratio>100, a value reflecting reduced systemic perfusion, had decreased in 2003 and was even lower in 2004-2006, but BUNC may be a marker of low specificity for extracellular dehydration. Mortality risk did not vary between these periods, when associated with plasma tonicity <275 or >300 mOsm/l but was lower in 2003 when associated with BUNC ratio>100. These results suggest shifts in hydration profiles through and after the 2003 heat wave that may be attributed to adoption of advice from the “National heat wave response plan”. The study shows that prevention policy initiatives aiming to encourage euhydration may have a positive impact on the health of elderly people. Consequently it encourages further exploitation of the impact of hydration tips issued by various bodies which promote hydration from various foods and drinks in addition to still water. Eur J Epidemiol (2010) 25:517–524 The 2003 heat wave in France: hydration status changes in older inpatients A. Kettaneh, L. Fardet, N. Mario, A. Retbi m N. Taright, K. Tiev, I. Reinhard, B. Guidet, J. Cabane PREVENTION POLICY INITIATIVES AIMED AT ENCOURAGING EUHYDRATION MAY HAVE AN IMPACT ON THE HEALTH OF ELDERLY PEOPLE. Asst. Prof. Maria Kapsokefalou www.europeanhydrationinstitute.org HYDRATION SCIENTIFIC LIBRARY
  • 3. EHI Update: December 2010 It is well known that alcohol has an acute diuretic effect. In fact there is an increase in urine output during the first three hours after consuming an alcoholic beverage, but six hours after ingestion, the antidiuretic effects start and these can last up to 12 hours after consuming the drink. This effect is possibly due to the suppression of vasopressin. However, some authors argue that the consumption of alcoholic beverages such as beer may be useful in the rehydration of the athlete or worker after a prolonged physical effort. The aim of this research from Hobson & Maughan was to analyze the effect of a small dose of alcohol intake on urine production in both euhydrated and hypohydrated individuals in order to further the understanding of the effects of alcohol consumption in different physiological states. Twelve males completed an intermittent protocol that initially produced a dehydration of near 2% of the body mass. The experiment was repeated twice, once after rehydrating them and the second time remaining hypohydrated. The day after, one litre of beer (regular -4% alcohol- or alcohol free) was given to the group on two different occasions, and participants remained in the unit for a 4 hour monitoring period for urine and blood collections. The volume of urine was higher after alcohol intake only in euhydrated subjects: alcohol did not cause a significant diuresis when the subjects were hypohydrated. The results from Hobson and Maughan suggest that when the body is hypohydrated the diuretic action of alcohol is blunted in an attempt to restore fluid balance. The great variability in urine volumes produced after a single dose of alcoholic beverages may suggest a potential phenotype response as well as a certain habituation in regular consumers compared with non- consumers or occasional ones. Hobson RM, Maughan RJ. Hydration status and the diuretic action of a small dose of alcohol. Alcohol & Alcoholism, 2010; 45: 366-373. The results from Hobson and Maughan suggest that the diuretic action of alcohol is blunted when the body is hypohydrated in an attempt to restore fluid balance. HOW HYDRATION STATUS AFFECTS THE DIURETIC EFFECT OF BEER A review by Prof. Dr. Lluis Serra-Majem www.europeanhydrationinstitute.org HYDRATION SCIENTIFIC LIBRARY
  •             http://www.europeanhydrationinstitute.org/