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EDU2400 Digital Stories Part 7
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EDU2400 Digital Stories Part 7

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  • 1. DIGITAL STORYTELLING: CHAPTERS 13 & 14
    PRESENTED BY: IMELDA VALDIVIESO, TERESA KOKKAS, MELANIE BIBLE, BRIAN BEGG, KUSUM BOODHUN-NUNKOO, CHRIS CATHLINE
    From: Digital Storytelling in the Classroom by Jason Ohler
  • 2. AGENDA
    Chapter 13: VIDEO
    Hardware/Software required
    Chapter 14: Media Grammar
    Images
    Audio/Music
    Editing, transitions, and special effects
    Questions or Comments
  • 3. FINDING AND BUYING STUFF
    • HARDWARE:
    • 4. Reasonably recent computer
    • 5. Digital camera
    • 6. Zoom capacity, removable memory, flash, view screen, usb capability
    • 7. Flatbed scanner
    • 8. Desktop microphone
    • 9. Wireless microphone
    • 10. Other microphones
    • 11. Boom mike
    • 12. Shotgun mike
    • 13. Flat conference mike
    • 14. A video camera
    • 15. A music keyboard
    • 16. Other hardware (ex. cell phones, iPods, joysticks…etc)
  • FINDING AND BUYING STUFF
    SOFTWARE
    Movie or Media Editing Software
    Audio-Editing Software
    Music Software
    Green Screen Software
    DVD Mastering Software
    Other Software
  • 17. CHAPTER 14:Media Grammar for Teachers
    • Grammar is “a set of guidelines for the use of any language or medium that facilitates effective communication.”
    • 18. “Bumps” in digital stories are similar to grammatical errors in essays. Readers stumble on bumps which hinder the smooth reading of an essay.
    • 19. Examples of factors that can end up being media bumps if not used effectively
    • 20. Images
    • 21. Audio
    • 22. Music
    • 23. Editing
  • IMAGES
    “ A picture is worth a thousand words”
    • Images should be used effectively
    i.e.
    • The picture should be:
    (i) clear and focused
    (ii) well-lit
    (iii) appropriately composed
    (iv) arriving at the appropriate time
  • 24. THE PICTURE :
    The picture should not:
    • Be blurred
    • 25. Make the audience feel dizzy
    • 26. Be at odds with the story.
    • 27. detract from the experience of the story.
  • Pictures used in digital stories must “ support the story, be in focus, well-lit, well-composed, and well-selected.”
  • 28. The Grammar of Using Audio
    YES
    Narration is to be clear
    Narration should include emotion and inflection of the voice
    • Audio helps tell the story
    • 29. Audio is sometimes more important than the image
    NO
    • Narration should not be overpowered by music or lyrics
    • 30. Narrator should not speak too fast, nor too slow
  • The Grammar of Using Music
    Bad Example:
    • too many lyrics
    • 31. song does not relate to story
    • 32. pace is too fast
    • 33. song clutters narration
    • 34. Music helps to set the mood or evoke an emotion
    • 35. Music selection ought to be appropriate
    • 36. Good Example:
    • 37. No lyrics to overpower the narration
    • 38. even pace
    • 39. appropriate for the topic
  • Grammar of Editing, Transitions, and Titling in Digital Stories
    • Transitions help the flow between two images.
    • 40. Effects are like transitions but happen only to a specific image rather than between images.
    • 41. Variety of effects and transitions; from subtle (like soft focus) to the purposely obtrusive (pictures flipping end over end).
    • 42. The goal in using effects is to make sure they are supportive and unobtrusive.
    • 43. Seamless Transitions, Unobtrusive Effects
    • 44. Viewers should not notice edition
    • 45. When is an unsubtle effect okay? When it supports the story so well that you do not notice it.
    • 46. Clear Titles
    • 47. Titles need to be clear and stable long enough to read.
    • 48. Clear Citations
    • 49. Every digital story needs a clear citation page that cites the sources for all the images, sounds, music, and other media used in the story that are not original.
  • The Grammar of Organization in Digital Stories
    • Media piece should flow unobtrusively, grammar should be well paced and employs effective rhythm.
    • 50. Recommends that the teacher focus on two basic elements: structure and pacing.
    • 51. Structure
    • 52. “How did I get here?”
    • 53. Non-supportive image or scene changes, extraneous information and sub-plots, and poorly edited narrative can also easily destabilize structure.
    • 54. The most serious infraction of structure is simply a weak or poorly constructed story.
    • 55. In terms of the story core, all problems and questions should be clearly connected and solved by the end of the piece.
    • 56. Effective Pacing
    • 57. Good organization doesn’t ensure flow. Instead, flow is primarily dependent upon good pacing.
    • 58. A story’s pacing and rhythm often determine the audience’s interest and direct viewer’s sense of expectation.
    • 59. Good pacing doesn’t mean consistent pacing. Changing pace is often an effective way to support the action of the story.
    • 60. Infractions come in a number of varieties e.g. a digital story can spend too much time on one part of the narrative, leaving little time for the other parts.
     
    Goal is always effective communication!
  • 61. QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS??
    THE END

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