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EDU2400 Digital Stories Part 3

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  • 1. Digital Storytelling in the Classroom: New Media Pathways to Literacy, Learning and Creativity
    Chapters 5 & 6:
    Thinking about the Story &
    Applying Story Maps
    From: Digital Storytelling in the Classroom by Jason Ohler
    By: Piraveena, Stephanie, Hailey, Adna, Alexis, and Ali
  • 2. THE STORY CORE
    Hero’s Problem or Challenge
    Hero’s Transformation
    Hero’s Resolution
    From Story Core to Story Map
    • After you have come up with an idea and your story core, you can create a story map to outline your story
    VPS: Visual Portrait of a Story
    A VPS is a visual portrait of a story that Ohler uses to map out the story core and all the events that take place
  • 3. BEGINNING
    Information is presented/implied, which grounds the listener in the life of the character and sets the scene from which adventure emerges
    Main character is called to adventure; the ordinary routine of life is interrupted
    If story does not emerge from the events, then it is implied because the opening events contrast sharply with listener’s expectations of normal life
    Quest of some kind is described, implied or begun
    This establishes the beginning of problem which must be solved; it can be a question, obstacle, opportunity, goal, or other challenge that needs to be fully addressed
  • 4. ANNOTATED VISUAL PORTRAIT OF A STORY:
    BEGINNING
    PROBLEM (tension)
    “The call to adventure…”
    Ordinary life
    TRANSFORMATION
    BEGINNING(call to adventure)
  • 8. VPS: The Middle Section
    Drama/Adventures
    PROBLEM (tension)
    SOLUTION
    (resolution)
    • “Like a tension bridge held together by cables that keep it from falling apart.”
     
    • “Like a high-wire that characters are going to need to cross in order to get to the other side…the resolution.”
    • 9. “Slumped rather than straight, suggesting that things might become more challenging before they resolve.”
    • 10. “The middle looks like a circus tent… it’s within this tent that the real drama of the story unfolds.”
  •  The Beginning and the End of the Middle
    At the beginning of the middle the “problem” is presented. This may be an obstacle to overcome, an issue or mystery that needs to be solved or a goal to be achieved.
    At the end of the middle section the “solution” occurs. This may involve the overcoming of the obstacle presented, the solving of an issue or mystery or the achieving of a goal.
    What Makes the Middle Section So Important????
    TENSION AND RESOLUTION
     
    Problems that the protagonist encounters beg for some sort of resolution. This is what emotionally hooks the readers/viewers as they want to know what happens.
    Other Important Details about the Middle…
     
    • It is important not to provide extraneous details, overwhelming special effects etc. that take away from the story and that result in a failure to resolve the problem.
    • 11. In the middle, the main character embarks on a series of adventure which may be physical, mental, emotional or spiritual that relate to solving the problem.
    • 12. During the middle section the protagonist will undergo a “Transformation.”
  • Transformation
    You can’t just have the conflict easily resolved and everyone live happily ever after
    There needs to be some sort of struggle, the “hero” needs to work, to fail to be tested in order to succeed
    He needs to become stronger, smarter, wiser, more mature etc.
    This struggle is called the transformation and is necessary to the resolution of the challenge or conflict
    It doesn’t have to be a “Eureka!” type of moment, can be a gradual accumulation of knowledge and experience that allows the hero to complete the quest
    “old ” attitude
    “new” attitude
  • 13. The “old” version of you faces a problem
    Resists changing
    The situation impedes the necessary changes
    Ex. The hero needs to learn how to handle a sword in order to save the princess, but there is nobody around to teach him
    The “new” version needs to push himself past a certain point in order to transform
    This push and pull between old and new creates the tension-resolution dynamic
    needed to maintain the forward momentum of the story
    The change doesn’t have to come from within the hero, other variables such as fate, luck or hard work can cause enough of a disruption for the transformation to occur
  • 14. ANNOTATED VISUAL PORTRAIT OF A STORY:
    END
    PROBLEM (tension)
    SOLUTION
    (resolution)
    Drama/Adventures
    Closure
    “personal investment in listening has been honoured”
    “The call to adventure…”
    Transformation established
    Ordinary life
    “This includes rediscovering something you already knew but had forgotten or been avoiding”
    TRANSFORMATION
    BEGINNING(call to adventure)
  • 18. Elements of an Ending
    3 Elements or Characteristics of an ending
    Closure:An ending doesn’t leave the listener feeling as if the story teller ran out of material
    Endings should allow listeners to feel as though their personal investment in listening has been honoured.
    Not answering questions is a violation of the unspoken storyteller-story listener covenant
    This doesn’t mean that it can’t be an unhappy ending, but if it is, the storyteller should do it , deliberately with intent and purpose.
    Thus the key here is closure not the answer
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MPKJBX2QoE&feature=related
  • 19. Transformation: A transformation in the story is essential and what is learned from it is also put into play.
    Ideally, you, the listener also feel a sense of change.
    This includes rediscovering something you already knew but had forgotten or been avoiding
    “Showing rather than telling”: the story can move forward with some action or narrative that shows changes have been internalized by the characters.
    Stories can also conclude in an obvious way, by simply stating what has been learned in the form of a moral or personal revelation
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sXcN5H6zdw&feature=related
  • 20. Key Things to Remember
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LKknrXl35E&feature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncOF81xL9zQ – Digital Stories as Artefact
  • 21.
    • Digital stories are different to everyone, and each student makes a special contribution
    • 22. It encourages collaborative learning
    • 23. It exposes them to the views and personal history of their peers
    • 24. The emphasis on critical thinking allows students to understand their personal experiences with relation to society
    Final Thoughts