CSR & HR - Presentation Sophie Mueller

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CSR & HR - Presentation Sophie Mueller

  1. 1. European Commission policy on CSR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: STILL A CHALLENGE FOR HR? 22 October 2013, Brussels
  2. 2. Why CSR? • European citizens feel not informed about what companies do to manage their social and environmental impacts • Influential factor in strengthening the competitiveness and sustainability of European companies • Socially responsible behaviour of companies important to the values of the European Union
  3. 3. THE INTERNATIONAL CSR LANDSCAPE
  4. 4. Internationally recognised CSR guidelines and principles
  5. 5. OUR UNDERSTANDING OF CSR
  6. 6. A modern understanding of CSR  Commission definition: "The responsibility of enterprises for their impacts on society"  Definition consistent with global CSR instruments  Positive and negative impacts  All enterprises have impacts, all have a social responsibility
  7. 7. How should a company meet its social responsibility?  Legal compliance is a pre-requisite  Process of integrating social, environmental, ethical, consumer and human rights concerns into business strategy and operations, in cooperation with stakeholders For more detailed guidance: refer to internationally recognised CSR guidelines and principles
  8. 8. THE COMMISSION'S APPROACH – OUR 2011 – 2014 STRATEGY
  9. 9. What is our starting point? • No prescriptive approach • Encourage the application of good practices and support companies to adhere to international guidelines
  10. 10. What’s the aim?  Maximise creation of shared value, for company and owners/shareholders, and for other stakeholders and society at large  Identify, prevent and mitigate possible adverse impacts
  11. 11. Agenda for action 1. Enhancing visibility (Multistakeholder sector-based platforms, and award scheme for enterprise-stakeholder partnerships) 2. Improve and tracking levels of trust in business (consider measures on greenwashing, and surveys of citizen perceptions) 3. Code of good practice for self- and co-regulation 4. Enhancing market reward for CSR (consumption, investment, public procurement)
  12. 12. Agenda for action (continued) 5. Legislative proposal on company disclosure of social and environmental information 6. CSR in education, training and research 7. Importance of national and sub-national CSR policies 8. Better alignment of European and global approaches on CSR
  13. 13. CSR & HR
  14. 14. Some remarks • When CSR is embedded in mainstream business strategy it becomes a mechanism for unlocking human potential • Employees are a key stakeholder in any CSR programme • HR deals with recruiting people, managing, developing and motivating people – CSR can play a critical role in that
  15. 15. • • • • Human resource professionals have a key role to play to help a company achieve its CSR objectives. Employee involvement is a critical success factor for CSR performance. Human resource managers have the tools and the opportunity to leverage employee commitment to, and engagement in, the firm’s CSR strategy. High performing CSR organizations foster a culture of CSR and fully integrate CSR throughout their operations, rewarding and incentivizing CSR decisions and initiatives. Employees prefer to work for organizations aligned with their values; thus, incorporating CSR into the employee brand can enhance recruitment and retention, particularly in tight labour markets. CSR can be applied to the HR toolkit, resulting in a roadmap or pathway for human resource practitioners to follow who wish to contribute to the achievement of their organization’s sustainability and business aspirations, thereby improving social and environmental conditions locally and globally.
  16. 16. • • • • • • • “The argument for HR people taking the CSR agenda seriously can be summarized as follows: Companies are increasingly required to take account of the impact of their activities on society The credibility of CSR is dependent on delivery, not rhetoric HR is responsible for many of the key systems and processes (e.g. recruitment, training, communications) on which effective delivery depends HR people have relevant knowledge and skills in relation to organizational learning and cultural change Managing trust and risk raises fundamental issues about how people are managed Employees are a key stakeholder in any CSR program.” (CIPD, 2002, p. 15)
  17. 17. • • When CSR is embedded in mainstream business strategy it becomes a mechanism for unlocking human potential. CSR – HR = PR If employees are not engaged, corporate social responsibility becomes an exercise in public relations. The credibility of an organization will become damaged when it becomes evident the company is not “walking the talk” -- Adine Mees and Jamie Bonham, Canadian Business for Social Responsibility
  18. 18. THANK YOU Sophie.Mueller@ec.europa.eu http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/policies/sustainable-business/corporate-socialresponsibility/index_en.htm

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