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S88-Nov2011

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Making ISA-S-88 Control Systems More Affordable

Making ISA-S-88 Control Systems More Affordable

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  • Thank you for attending our presentation today. We have recorded our presentation on USB drives and you are welcome to take one with you at the end of the hour.
  • My name is Randy Otto and I represent ECS Solutions. We are a control systems integrator located in Evansville IN.We have been around for over 30 years now, implementing process control solutions for regional manufacturers. We provide services for any industry, however our three major markets are Foods, Power, and Metals. Through the years we have achieved certifications and integrators status with many control system and HMI platforms, however we are most proud to claim that we are a “certified” member of the Control System Integrators Association.
  • In 2009, ECS won a contract with a major North American Foods manufacturer. Our contract was to provide the controls and instrumentation on a sizeable new batch process for one of their US plants. What I am about to show you is why this project is significant, not only to that particular manufacturer, but to anyone with a batch control process. We will go through an overview of this project, including the size of the project, the challenges we faced, and the key decisions that led to our success. I will also show the key features that allowed this project to receive greater than expected results.
  • The user wanted to consolidate three existing kitchens into one large, “superkitchen”, in an effort to increase efficiencies and capacities. On the surface, our project was not a lot different then many batch control upgrades. We had to replace the existing controls and instrumentation with new controls and instrumentation. However, the area designated for the new kitchen was the same area of the existing three kitchens. During a period where demand was increasing for their product, they could not afford to take anything out of production while the new kitchen was installed. The plan was to phase in a new kitchen and control system over top of the old without interfering with existing production. For controls, this meant a system that would have to tie into an assortment of different controllers (including Allen Bradley and Modicon) and continuously adapt to changes from phasing in new equipment and phasing out old equipment. Not an easy task for a small project, let alone one of this size and magnitude.
  • We began by relocating kitchen 3 and some other equipment to free up some space. This was accomplished over a weekend.
  • We removed some walls and moved some other tanks to clear room for the initial set of cook kettles to be installed.
  • And began the installation of the new kitchen. Remember, this was being accomplished while the existing kitchens continued to run production. Once the initial set of kettles was installed, production trials started on the new equipment…..and the installation continued.
  • One of the old kitchens was then removed to make room for more new equipment. More tanks and kettles were installed and phased into production.
  • Once the new kitchen was installed and running production, the remaining two pre-existing kitchens were removed.
  • ….to provide the final configuration the equipment is in today.
  • The new kitchen was not a small kitchen. To give you an idea of the magnitude, our process involved 70 different tanks and kettles. We had 120 variable frequency drives for motor control of agitators and pumps…
  • …and over 1200 air valves and mix-proof valves…These valves were installed in multiple clusters to provide a network of valves that would allow various configurations…and essentially allow anything to be piped anywhere…Henceforth, the new consolidated kitchen, with super flexibility, became known as the ‘Superkitchen’.
  • …and to add to the complexity, (5) clean-in-place-systems were installed that mix and match any combination of the valves, pumps, and instrumentation to clean portions of the system while other portions remained in production.As I have shown you the equipment involved, you can see this was not a simple kitchen. Now that I have given you a rough idea of the amount of equipment to be controlled, I’ll run through the scope of work for the controls and instrumentation.
  • Our scope of work was like most projects. We had to define the system architecture,
  • provide the hardware designs and drawings,
  • specify the instrumentation
  • …we had to procure the materials including the controllers, variable frequency drives, operator panels, solenoid valves, PC’s and network hardware, and all of the instrumentation.
  • We had to fabricate (8) 2-door Control Panels, (16) motor panels, (13) operator terminal panels, and (50) valve panels.
  • We provided the software development for the controller, the operator interface display graphics and faceplates, and all of the recipes and procedures.Everything I have explained to this point provides a background of the size and scope of the project in an effort to appreciate the challenges we faced. Now to explain the challenges…
  • We faced a lot of challenges along the way, but clearly the most significant was the schedule….we had 10 weeks to pull this off and prepare for production trials. I think anyone here would agree that this is a major feat. Some might think it is impossible. I was there an I still can hardly believe it. Our second challenge was commissioning the initial tanks in (1) week. The panels we fabricated and delivered had to be installed inside of the 10 week period so we could begin commissioning immediately. You can imagine commissioning a system on such a fast pace normally creates a lot of wiring mistakes,…this was no different. We had to physically have our controls engineers standing next to the electrical contractor while they terminated wires so we could test immediately after they landed wires. We couldn’t afford to wait until the next day, every hour was important. Our third challenge was the phased implementation. Once our initial trials were run, we didn’t have time to catch our breath…we had to merge the new controls with the with the controls of the existing kitchens in order to phase them out with new incoming equipment…”While production was maintained”…and “While Construction continued”. We worked 24/7 for the next 10 weeks to phase in the remaining equipment. To address these three challenges, we made several key decisions….
  • Because of the extremely short schedule, time was of the essence. We would normally spend days and weeks, interviewing the right operators, engineers, and managers, to prepare a detailed functional description of the system before we started programming. For this project, this was impossible. No one was available to spend that kind of time putting definition to the system, not from the end user and not from ECS. Because of the lack of definition…we needed a solution that was modular, one that allowed us to develop the detailed functional description as the project progressed. The S88 standard allowed us to do that. One of the most important concepts S88 offered our project was to separate the equipment programming from the process programming…..in other words, S88 allowed us to program “what the equipment was capable of doing” rather than spending time defining “what to do with the equipment.” This was extremely important in allowing us to start programming immediately and to program in an effective way so we did not have to backtrack at some later point in the project.
  • An equally important concept S88 offered was to program the equipment in small building blocks. Once we determined to program the system for what the equipment was capable of, we were able to build small blocks of code to control small field devices. We programmed the blocks such that ….
  • …we could later assemble the blocks however we chose to assemble them, and…
  • … to add any ingredient we wanted to add.….
  • … and at a later time, we could utilize these blocks to build a recipe, once we knew “what the customer wanted to do with the equipment.” S88 provided this path. Our next key decision involved the software development….
  • We chose to use Rockwell’s FactoryTalk Batch to develop recipes and perform the batch management functions. This project was bid to provide a custom software solution and did not spec FactoryTalk Batch or S88. However, with the short delivery schedule, we needed FactoryTalk Batch to reduce development time so we didn’t have to create the batch management and recipe functions from scratch. Even with FactoryTalk Batch, we had a tremendous amount of code to develop in the controller and HMI for the blocks that S88 defines as equipment modules and control modules. We developed some software innovations that provided an extremely modular and flexible solution for the controller and HMI and within those innovations, we created some advanced features and diagnostic tools. This modular approach helped us reduce development time, and the flexibility and diagnostics were critical in the success of commissioning and startup. During the phased implementation, the piping contractor would pipe a series of valves incorrectly and within minutes, we could adjust the controller and HMI configurations instead of spending hours or days reprogramming. To provide an overview of how this looked conceptually….
  • We used FactoryTalk Batch to develop the recipes and procedures and all of the batch management functions. FT Batch provided the “automatic” control of the system. The ControlLogix handled all of the code for the equipment modules and control modules and contained our software innovations…and FactoryTalk View SE provided the operator interface for manual and semi-automatic control.
  • With a short schedule and lack of definition, our engineers decided to bring everything we could to the operator interface….and we brought everything. We developed a typical equipment module faceplate that provided the operator with every piece of information available…and with the right security, gave the operator the ability to make changes to that data. During normal automatic operation, FTBatch controls the process. However, if a non-ideal situation occurs, and they inevitably do, this faceplate gives the operator the information and tools to know ‘exactly’ what is keeping this equipment module from doing its job….tools to deal with the situation quickly and keep the process running. The tabs at the bottom of the faceplate help filter the information.
  • Every equipment module faceplate gives a list of all control modules, complete with status indications of the control modules, that are acquired by that EM. Selecting an individual control module tile pulls up the control module faceplate, provides additional information such as manual controls and the physical plant location of the device. And if the control module is currently acquired by a different equipment module, which we had over 1000 equipment modules, you can immediately pull up the faceplate that has it acquired. The operator can make decisions at that point whether to wait on the other EM or force priority over that EM and take immediate control.
  • The second tab provides access to all control modules that are interlocked. These tiles also provide feedback as to the availability of the interlocked control module. The Detail settings tab provides a means to monitor and make adjustments to settings specific to that particular equipment module, such as spill value, drip duration and maximum operating time. Other tabs provide information on certain “permissives”, “process interlocks”, “safety interlocks”, and “faults”.
  • Just like the production recipes, the automaticclean-in-place procedures were developed using a recipe in FTBatch. And just like the standard equipment modules, the clean-in-place equipment modules allow the operator to clean in a semi-automatic mode. This faceplate is similar to the standard EM faceplate, but has additional information required by a clean-in-place system such as flow rate, temperature, conductivity, and duration. We provided pull down lists to select the source and the return. The ability for “the operator” to quickly control or rerun specific steps allowed the operator to run the Cleaning process instead of clean-in-place technicians and substantially decreased the time required to clean the equipment.
  • A tool we call the “Alert Navigator” provides an “alert” to the operator on the graphic screen, indicating that “operator attention is required”. This may be part of a sequence that requires operator intervention or could be caused by a system failure such as a failed control valve.
  • The operator selects the “alert indicator” and another faceplate lists all available equipment modules for that particular tank and indicates which equipment module needs attention.
  • Selecting the flashing tile pulls up the corresponding equipment module faceplate. From here, the operator can identify and provide the proper attention to the issue. If a control module is causing a problem, the alert navigator will guide the operator to the control module that is causing an issue.
  • The operator can quickly select the flashing tile, pull up the corresponding control module faceplate, and deal with the problem. This alert navigator saves the operator a tremendous amount of time. Instead of calling a maintenance technician and having them sift through thousands of rungs of code to find out what is preventing the step from completing, the answer is at the operators fingertips. The technician only gets called if the operator finds a real hardware problem such as a valve that is an issue and the operator can tell the technician which valve is bad and where it is physically located in the plant. That saves a lot of downtime!
  • Pipe animation shows different colors for different ingredients and liquids. This allows an operator to quickly identify what the system is doing. We also built in a feature that shows residue of the most recent liquid that filled the pipe. This is beneficial if something did not complete properly, such as a cleaning process was interrupted before lines were properly rinsed, the operator can quickly see what state the equipment is in.
  • Objects on the graphic screens indicate if they are opened or closed, running or stopped. We also indicate if the device is Acquired or Interlocked to show if an equipment module is driving that particular device, as opposed to manually operating the devices from the control module faceplate.
  • Electronic work instructions are a standard part of FactoryTalk Batch and allow the operator to interface with a recipe, manually add ingredients as a step in a recipe, and provide feedback that is logged into the Batch records. To simplify things for the operator, we added the ability to receive and interact with work instructions on the graphic screen directly associated with a particular tank. When showing work instructions, the Alert Navigator ALSO flashes, indicating that operator attention is required.
  • The operators were used to running three individual kitchens. The flexibility of a “superkitchen” that allowed anything to go anywhere also provided more opportunities to for the operators to make mistakes. We added a screen that allowed three operators to select exactly which tanks they wanted to use to process their particular campaign of batches. The operator would select the tanks, select the recipe, and enter a number of batches, press “Start” and the system would take care of the rest.
  • The previous features I have shown you are for the benefit of the operator. This particular feature is for the developer and engineer. With the short commissioning time, we built in full simulation into our system. We can run recipes and watch them advance through each step. While on a step, we can watch the valves get acquired and interlocked and see the product flow via the pipe animation. We can see levels, temperatures, and flows rise and fall. With our fully simulated system, we can build new recipes from scratch and watch them run through the equipment from start to finish. We can force unusual conditions and test recoveries. With this level of simulation, we can commission equipment in amazingly short times with relatively few issues. Commissioning becomes what it should be, testing the field devices and wiring, not testing the code. Simulation provides and additional benefit….Operators can be trained on a live system before the equipment is installed, saving even more time in startup. All of the features I have shown you are not all new and amazing. We wanted to show you that we delivered a high feature, high performance system while achieving the challenges.
  • To recap those challenges…..First, we faced an extremely aggressive schedule, to anyone’s standards….10 weeks to design, develop, and deliver a system of this size is an incredibly short time.Second, we had a short startup schedule…commissioning 12 tanks and all the associated valves, pumps, and instrumentation to be able to run production by the end of that week was brutal. Third, we had a very complex phased implementation of the remaining 58 tanks….While Production was Maintained!...And While Construction Continued!
  • To recap the key decisions….We utilized the S88 standard, allowing us to separate the equipment programming from the process programming and to structure our code using modular building blocks that we could later stack into whatever process the end user wanted to define. We used FactoryTalk Batch to reduce development time, provide flexible recipe development, and automatic operation of the equipment. We developed software innovations for the equipment modules and control modules that further reduced development time and provided advanced features and diagnostics. By implementing these key decisions, we achieved some amazing and unexpected results.
  • The original justification for this project came from a reduction in a large contracted staff, an increase in efficiencies, the replacement of obsolete controls, and increased capacities.The original justification was over $6M annually. By using FactoryTalk Batch and the software innovations ECS implemented for the equipment modules and control modules, the results realized significantly exceeded the originally anticipated ROI.
  • The end user realized a savings of $300,000 in reduced development effort. The ability of FactoryTalk Batch to synchronize control between units within a class based recipe even further reduced the required contracted staff. And the advanced features and diagnostics of the software innovations that we delivered significantly reduced downtime and maintenance. The end user realized $1M annually in ADDITIONAL savings over and above the original $6M justification for the project due solely to the software implementation. By providing a cleaning procedure in a class-based recipe that allowed the plant to make small incremental improvements, the plant was able to maximize the effectiveness of the cleaning process and substantially decrease the required cleaning time. The Cleaning process dropped from a 13 hour/week task down to a 5 hour/week task. The labor savings is almost insignificant when compared to the additional capacity generated on the equipment.This additional annual return continues to payback year-after-year-after-year as long as the equipment and control system are in service.
  • With this project, we delivered a high featured system, in less time, at less cost!The customer did not specify the S88 standard or FactoryTalk Batch, however we were able to add FTBatch along with all of its features and still deliver for less overall cost. We demonstrated using the S88 standard and FactoryTalk Batch indeed drive down cost. In the process we developed software innovations, we have since refined into a product called S88 builder, that even further drove down schedule and cost…allowing us to deliver a complex control system in an amazingly short time. What was a surprise to all of us was the ultimate payoff when the end user realized a greater than expected annual return due to the advanced features and advanced diagnostics.If you have a project and need speed to market, If you have a short project schedule,Or you need a flexible solutionIf you cannot afford to lose production while phasing in new equipmentOr you simply want to reduce development time and costsWe have demonstrated the success of usingFactoryTalk Batch and our S88 Builder software innovation as the ultimate solution to deliver a better system, in less time, for less cost.
  • (for actual presentation, not video) Our entire presentation is recorded on these thumb drives. Please take one with you. I would like to thank you for your attendance. I will be glad to answer any questions you might have at this time. Feel free to contact me with any future questions you may have. Thank you for your time.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Making ISA-S-88 Control Systems More AffordableInsert Photo Here Randy Otto ECS Solutions Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 2. Introduction Evansville, IndianaFounded in 1977 Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 3. Overview 2009 •  Overview of the project •  Size and scope •  Challenges •  Key Decisions •  Key Features •  Results Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 4. Overview (consolidate 3 pre-existing kitchens) K3 INGREDIENT K3 COLD HOLD SLURRY KITCHEN 3 TnT CIP TOMATO DUMPERS KITCHEN 1 KITCHEN 2 HYDRAU- FLAKER K1 & K2 INGREDIENT SLURRY Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 5. Overview (relocate kitchen 3) DEMO CAN OPENER MOVE KITCHEN 3 CIP MOVE TnT CIP Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 6. Overview (clear area for initial kettles) MOVE STARCH TO SOUTH DEMO WALLS & PLATFORM MOVE HYDRAUFLAKERS TO TEMPORARY LOCATION Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 7. Overview (installation of initial kettles) NEW CONVEYOR SYSTEM NEW PLATFORM &  INGREDIENT SLURRY KETTLES NEW PLATFORM & KITCHEN KETTLES MOVE TOMATO DUMPERS Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 8. Overview (demolition kitchen 1 / continue installation) DEMO WALL NEW ADDITIONAL CONVEYORS NEW PLATFORM & SAUTE KETTLES NEW PLATFORM & KITCHEN KETTLES Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 9. Overview (demolition kitchens 2 and 3) DEMO KITCHEN 3 & K3 SLURRY MOVE HYDRAUFLAKERS TO PERMANENT LOCATION DEMO K3 COLD HOLD DEMO KITCHEN 2 Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 10. Overview (final configuration) Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 11. Size of New System70 Tanks / Kettles 120 Variable Frequency Drives Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 12. Size of New System 1,200 Valves Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 13. Size of New System 5 Clean-in-Place Systems Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 14. ECS Scope of SupplySystem Architecture Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 15. ECS Scope of Supply Hardware Design Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 16. ECS Scope of SupplyInstrument Specification Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 17. ECS Scope of SupplyControllers Motor Controls Operator Terminals Procure Materials Solenoid Valves Network Hardware /Instrumentation Servers / Computers Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 18. ECS Scope of Supply 16 Motor Panels Panels 8 PLC Panels 50 Valve Panels13 Operator Panels Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 19. ECS Scope of SupplySoftware Development Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 20. Challenges Short Commissioning Short Development Schedule Schedule Hardware Design Procure Materials Panel Fab & Install Production System TrialsArchitecture Software Development (12 tanks) 10 weeks 1 week Phased Implementation While Maintaining Production Phased Startup and Commissioning (Remaining 58 tanks) 10 weeks Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 21. Key Decisions S88 Physical Model Process Cell “SEPARATE” UnitEquipment PhaseEquipment Module Equipment Control Module Programming Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 22. Key Decisions S88 Physical Model Process Cell Unit Valve A Valve B Valve C PumpEquipment PhaseEquipment Module Control Module Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 23. Key Decisions S88 Physical Model Process Cell Unit Valve C Valve A Valve BEquipment Phase PumpEquipment Module Control Module Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 24. Key Decisions S88 Physical Model Process Cell Unit Add Water Valve C Valve A Valve BEquipment Phase PumpEquipment Module Control Module Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 25. Key Decisions S88 Physical Model Process Cell Water Unit Ingr A Ingr B HeatEquipment Phase AgitateEquipment Module Transfer Control Module Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 26. Key Decisions S88 Physical Software Model Development Process Cell Recipes •  FactoryTalk Batch •  Software Innovations FT Batch Unit S88 Area ModelEquipment Phase Equipment Phase Graphics FT View ControlLogixEquipment Module Equipment Module EM Faceplates Control Module Control Module CM Faceplates Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 27. Conceptual Overview FactoryTalk Batch •  Recipes / Procedures •  Automatic Control •  Batch Management ControlLogix PAC •  Equipment Modules •  Control Modules •  Software InnovationsFactoryTalk View SE•  Operator Interface•  Manual / Semi-automatic interface Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 28. Intelligent Equipment Module FaceplatesEquipment Module Faceplate Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 29. Intelligent Equipment Module FaceplatesEquipment Module Faceplate Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 30. Intelligent Equipment Module FaceplatesEquipment Module Faceplate Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 31. Simple Clean-in-Place Clean-in-Place FaceplateCleaningProcedure Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 32. Alert Navigator Alert Navigator Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 33. Alert Navigator Alert Navigator Ingr A Ingr G Ingr M Ingr U Ingr B Ingr H Ingr N Ingr V Ingr C Ingr I Ingr O Ingr W Ingr D Ingr I Ingr P Ingr X Ingr E Ingr K Ingr Q Ingr S Ingr F Ingr L Ingr T Ingr R Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 34. Alert Navigator Alert Navigator Ingr A Ingr G Ingr M Ingr U Ingr B Ingr H Ingr N Ingr V Ingr C Ingr I Ingr O Ingr W Ingr D Ingr I Ingr P Ingr X Ingr E Ingr K Ingr Q Ingr S Ingr F Ingr L Ingr T Ingr R Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 35. Alert Navigator Alert Navigator Ingr A Ingr G Ingr M Ingr U Ingr B Ingr H Ingr N Ingr V Ingr C Ingr I Ingr O Ingr W Ingr D Ingr I Ingr P Ingr X Ingr E Ingr K Ingr Q Ingr S Ingr F Ingr L Ingr T Ingr R Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 36. Pipe Animation Built-in Pipe Animation •  15 Colors •  Shows residue – most recent product Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 37. Device Animation Acquired / Interlocked Status •  Acquired / Interlock status displayed throughout Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 38. Electronic Work Instructions Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 39. Production Scheduler Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 40. Fully Simulated System Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 41. Recap Challenges Short •  (10) weeks for developmentSchedule Short •  (1) week commissioning for initial 12 tanksStartupPhased •  Phased implementation during production Install Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 42. Recap Key Decisions ISA-S88 •  “Separate” Equipment from Process Programming Standard •  Modular, building blocks •  Recipe Development / Automatic Operation FTBatch •  Performance Optimization Software •  Equipment Module / Control Module DevpInnovations •  Advanced Features / Advanced Diagnostics Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 43. Results Original JustificationReduction in large contracted staff Increase in efficiencies Replacement ofobsolete controls Increase in capacity Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 44. Results Unexpected Return from Software $20M Reduced $18MDevelopment $16M $14M $12M FT Batch $10Mand Software $8M Innovations $6M $4M $2M Cleaning 2010 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2011Process time reduction Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 45. Better, Quicker, for Less S88 Physical Model Speed to Market Process Cell Short Project Unit ScheduleEquipment Phase Flexible Solution Maintain ProductionEquipment Module Levels Save Development Control Module Costs / Time Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 46. QuestionsRandy J. OttoVice PresidentRandy.Otto@ECSSolutions.com812-431-7824812-479-5170 x503 Copyright © 2011 ECS Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.