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Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence
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Expanding cooperative housing in lawrence

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Expanding Cooperative Housing in Lawrence …

Expanding Cooperative Housing in Lawrence
Jason Hering, President of Oread Neighborhood Association

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  • 1. Expanding Cooperative Housing in Lawrence A discussion on the history and potentialexpansion of the cooperative housing system in Lawrence, Kansas
  • 2. Cooperative Houses and a Need for Community
  • 3. First Half of the 20th century we hadthe WWI, the Great Depression, WWII
  • 4. Community as support structure
  • 5. Need for CommunityGeneral Social Survey, funded by the National ScienceFoundation in 2006 found that.-A quarter of Americans say they have no one with whomthey can discuss personal troubles, more than double thenumber who were similarly isolated in 1985.-The number of people who said they counted a neighboras a confidant dropped by more than half, from about 19percent to about 8 percent.
  • 6. Average House Size in the US
  • 7. Lonely NationThe comprehensive new study paints a soberingpicture of an increasingly fragmented America,where intimate social ties—once seen as anintegral part of daily life and associated with ahost of psychological and civic benefits—areshrinking or nonexistent. In bad times, far morepeople appear to suffer alone.
  • 8. Now and ThenIn the first part of the21st century:Iraq and Afganistan andthe Great Recession
  • 9. We Need Community Now MoreThan Ever.Not to mention... Peakoil and climate change
  • 10. Lonely NationNow more than everpeople will be facingthese ideas alone.
  • 11. ● History of the Co-ops and the threads that connect● University of Kansas Student Housing Association (UKSHA) as it stands now and recent history● Expansion Ideas
  • 12. Co-op History in LawrenceMaking Do & Getting Through: KU Co-ops,Halls and Houses 1919-1966McElhenie, Fred. Published by the Historic Mount Oread Fund. University of Kansas StudentDepartment of Student Housing, 2006. www.kubookstore.com
  • 13. Co-op Beginnings● Lakota Co-op (1919- ● Accommodated 45-50 girls ● Cooperative House Fund saved 1925) - 1122, 1127 Ohio by 10 sororities● Wita Wenton Co-op ● "good homes at reasonable costs (1919-1926) 1208 might be furnished for girls who must live economically while in Mississippi school."● Wankanta Co-op (1919- ● "members who act as chaperone, 1926) - 1231 Louisiana business manager, and cooks earning a share of their expenses● Picture of early by their work" student room from book
  • 14. "
  • 15. ~
  • 16. Changing Groups at 1614"Jayhawk Co-op was disbanded March "From 1956-1961, it was named13, 1943. Kaw Koettes moved over to Hilden Gibson Co-op. Few recordsoccupy the house." exists for the period 1944-1961. As"The members were split up and far as can be discerned, no organizedwent to either John Moore Co-op or group has lived there until recently."Rock Chalk Co-op... World War IIexacted a toll on the co-ops."Ex-members moved back in thefollowing semester.Became a womens group in 1951-1955 and was known as Rochdale Co-op Annex
  • 17. Rochdale Principles 3. Member Economic Participation : Members equitably● Set of ideals established by the contribute the capital of their cooperative. That capital is common property of the cooperative and members usually receive limited compensation. Surplus economy (i.e. profits) Rochdale Society of Equitable are managed by the members to develop the cooperative, Pioneers in 1844 and adopted by support other organizations, or returned to the members. the International Cooperative 4. Autonomy: The Rochdale Principles state that cooperatives must be autonomous and independent. If they Alliance (ILC) enter into partnerships with other organization it must be on terms that ensure democratic control by their members. For1. Voluntary and Open Membership : Cooperative Societies instance, if a cooperative enters an economic partnership withmust have open and voluntary membership. The Rochdale another organization, that organization does not gain controlPrinciples established important anti-discrimination policies over decision making, regardless of the sum they haveand a system of motivations and rewards to expand contributed. Decisions are always made by members.membership. 5. Education, Training and Information: Cooperatives must2. Democratic Member Control : The Rochdale Principles provide education and training to their members. Additionally,mandate that cooperatives must have democratic member cooperatives provide information and education to the publiccontrol. This gives members the right to participate in the about the nature of co-operation.decision making processes of their cooperative. One member= one vote. 6. Cooperation among Cooperatives: Cooperatives are autonomous organizations, but they work together to facilitate communication across cooperatives and strengthen the cooperative movement. 7. Concern for the Community: Cooperatives must be responsible partners for their communities. Decisions must benefit the larger community.http://cultivate.coop/wiki/Rochdale_Principles
  • 18. Tie-In-- Rochdale Principles created acoherent set of values and principles Instrumental in thesearound which multiple organizations developments wasformulated a vision for the future ofstudent housing co-ops. Luther Buchele--These organization included UKSHA(more on that in a second), the CLCC(later to become NASCO), the ICC,and others
  • 19. Luther Buchele----Kansas Native Regarded as "the father of student--Enrolled at KU in 1939 and joined housing cooperative housingthe Jayhawk Co-op in 1940 movements" because the--Helped organize the University of cooperatives he built served asKansas Student Housing Association models for those at otherin 1941 and six new co-ops before universities. Retired from the ICC in1951 1985.--Helped organize the Central Leagueof Campus Cooperatives and theNorth American Student CooperativeLeague in late 40s--Began work as executive secretaryfor the Inter- Cooperative Council inAnn Arbor, Michigan in 1951
  • 20. University of Kansas Student HousingAssociation (UKSHA)"A letter from Luther Buchele dated -- In mid-50s, several leadingMarch 27, 1941, indicates that Hilden members left or passed away and asGibson, associate professor of political the co-ops were losing members andscience, assisted Jayhawk Co-op in shutting down, the organization soldbecoming incorporated as a nonprofitorganization. It became known as the all properties and put the money intoUniversity of Kansas Student Housing a savings accountAssociation." This was found in 1969 by J. Keith--Also helped in formation: Miller with a goal of creatingHilden Gibson- KU Assoc. Prof qualitative experimentation toJohn Moore - Head of KU YMCA Chapter develop pragmatic social practicesGeorge Docking - Sr. Exec at 1st National with community living situations,Bank and later became governor of KS backed by data found in real-life experiments (based on Walden Two by B.F. Skinner).
  • 21. Restart of UKSHA ThroughExperimentation-(1406 Tennessee)-Originally two houses served as overflow houses for fraternities-- Buildings were attached roughly when they were turned into a singlenursing home. Due to poor practices, the nursing home was shut down andput onto the market for cheap-- Keith Miller, professor of human development and family life at KU, foundthe UKSHA savings account and had a plan. Inspired by Walden Two, he aimedto develop an egalitarian group living environment for students using behavioranalysis. The result was the CIA (Campus Improvement Association) House at1406 Tennessee Street, opening in the fall of 1969. The house became acenter for activism, but while enjoying some success, responsibilities wereneglected and the co-op began to fall apart.
  • 22. UKSHA Now---3 Co-op Houses---1 Paid employee-After closing for a summer to reorganize, the house reopened as theSunflower House in the spring of 1972. The new work sharing system and thenew environment were successful in providing a stable atmosphere and thehouse has flourished ever since. Now, UKSHA has begun a new period of expansion by repurchasing the oldJayhawk Co-op at 1614 Kentucky street, which re-opened its doors in 1998and in October of 2005 Ad Astra house opened at 1033 Kentucky.-Houses owned by NASCO Properties and leased by UKSHA,which retains local control
  • 23. NASCO (North American Studentsfor Cooperation)Basically a Co-op for Co-opsIronically, NASCO was the very organization that membersof UKSHA helped form came to the rescue of theLawrence Co-op housing systemAgreement made in 2009 to become a NASCO Properties(NP) member Sell properties to NP Use NP and UKSHA funds to renovate
  • 24. Ad Astra Co-op1033 Kentucky StreetHouse was bought for $1 and moved down the hill fromOhio streetOpened in the Fall of 2005- 9 Bedrooms- 3 Bathrooms
  • 25. Olive House (Jayhawk/1614) Co-op--1614 Kentucky StreetFormerly 20 memberswith 2 house parents$17/month room/boardNow:9 Bedrooms$325/month room/board
  • 26. Sunflower House Co-op1406 Tennessee Street- 33 Bedrooms- 5 Bathrooms
  • 27. Post RenovationTotal Sunflower House members In the following months, the groupstayed very low (10-15) for the year (and the UKSHA Board along withafter renovation advice from NP staffperson Daniel ...) dealt with many policy changes,UKSHA Board and NP came up with changes to the labor and food"re-seeding" idea of having several systems, re-creation of the lease andveteran members of the smaller co- leasing terms, and eventually a re-ops (along with one Haskell student) interviewing process for all formerto move into Sunflower to attempt to members.improve desirability of house inexchange for free rent for up to two Process also known as amonths. "colonization" and was perceived as unfair.6? people volunteered and moved inwith lofty goals The house reached the full capacity of 33 ? months later and in Aug we saw every member sign a year-long lease
  • 28. What are the Goals forExpansion?● Meeting unmet needs ○ Single-parent/small family co-op apartments ○ Pet friendly house ○ Co-op business incubator house● Meeting increased demand ○ All three houses turned away applicants last year● Creating more democratically controlled housing options that empower members to be their own landlord● Getting more people to experience cooperative living!● Increase ability to switch houses with another co-oper ○ More houses allows for switching between houses that have different cultures while allowing members to stay within the co-op system
  • 29. "If you want peace, start a co-op." Toyohiko Kagawa
  • 30. Potential Properties
  • 31. 1011 and 1017 Indiana--Hopkins Hall- 1011 1017 IndianaIndiana (1942-1955)--In discussions withlandlord to turn into aco-op house
  • 32. Cosmic Beauty School(formerly... Furniture store)
  • 33. 1127 Ohio---Formerly one of thefirst quasi co-op housesin Lawrence-- Lakota Co-op in 1919-- 12-14 women and achaperone

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