Culturally Responsive - Positive
Behavioral Interventions and
Supports:
A commitment to equity in school
cultures
January ...
Dora J. Dome Biography

Dora J. Dome has practiced Education Law for over 17 years, primarily in the areas of
student issu...
1/8/14

Culturally Responsive - Positive
Behavioral Interventions and
Supports:
A commitment to equity in school cultures
...
1/8/14

© 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 4

	
  

What Do you Make of the Data?
Why are African American Students
disciplined at a ...
1/8/14

Asking the Right
Questions
Thinking Historically,
Acting Systemically

What are the long-lasting cultural
assumpti...
1/8/14

Elements	
  of	
  CR	
  -­‐	
  PBIS	
  

Social	
  Competence	
  &	
  
Academic	
  Achievement	
  

Cultural Equit...
1/8/14

How do we know when we’re
making progress?
•  ShiX	
  from	
  teaching	
  desired	
  behaviors	
  to	
  creaDng	
 ...
1/8/14

…to this
The	
  moral	
  purpose	
  of	
  the	
  systemic	
  change	
  effort	
  
via	
  CRPBIS	
  is	
  for	
  for...
Dora dome crpbis
Dora dome crpbis
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Dora dome crpbis

310

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
310
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
20
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Dora dome crpbis"

  1. 1. Culturally Responsive - Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: A commitment to equity in school cultures January 16, 2014 8:30AM – 10:00AM 2014 ACSA Every Child Counts Symposium Monterey, CA Presented by: Nancy Dome, Ed.D and Dora J. Dome, Esq.
  2. 2. Dora J. Dome Biography Dora J. Dome has practiced Education Law for over 17 years, primarily in the areas of student issues and special education. She currently provides legal representation to school districts on student issues, and has renewed her emphasis on developing and conducting professional development trainings for district staff that focus on Bullying, Equity and Legal Compliance in a proactive effort to build staff capacity to address the changing needs of their students. Ms. Dome’s work with Bullying focuses on helping school districts create the necessary infrastructure to identify and address bullying in schools and to provide staff with effective strategies to respond to various forms of bullying and harassment. Her Equity trainings examine diversity and equity issues facing school districts such as examining stereotypes that impact attitudes and behavior of staff and students, identifying the harmful effects of stereotypes within the school setting, and coaching staff to develop skills to identify, interrupt and prevent discriminatory behavior. Ms. Dome’s legal compliance trainings provide up-to-date information and guidance on how to ’stay legal’ in the areas of special education, student discipline and Section 504. Admitted to the Hawaii State Bar in 1996, Ms. Dome served as a special education consultant and trainer for the Hawaii State Department of Education and Hawaii State Department of Health for five years. Ms. Dome was admitted to the California Bar in 2003. She worked with the education law firm of Dannis Woliver Kelley, (fka Miller Brown and Dannis) for eight years. Ms. Dome has studied in the areas of Race and Ethnicity, Critical Legal Studies and Critical Race Theory and has been certified as a Cultural Diversity Trainer by the National Coalition Building Institute (aka NCBI). She has developed and conducted trainings for numerous school districts and school boards in the areas of student diversity and equity, student and special education discipline, harassment/discrimination, bullying, special education, No Child Left Behind, alternative assessments for African American students, Section 504, and student records. Ms. Dome also regularly presents at association conferences such as ACSA, CSBA and CASCWA. She also participated on the Gay & Lesbian Athletics Foundations (aka GLAF) Keynote Panel on “Race and Racism in LGBT Athletics” and presented at the NCAA Black Coaches Association Annual Conference on “Homophobia in Sports.” She graduated from University of Hawaii, Richardson School of Law (J.D.) and from University of California, Los Angeles (B.A.). Ms. Dome is an Adjunct Professor at Mills College and a Lecturer at the University of California at Berkeley, teaching Education Law and Policy in the administrative credential programs for soon to be administrators.
  3. 3. 1/8/14 Culturally Responsive - Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: A commitment to equity in school cultures January 16, 2014 8:30AM – 10:00AM 2014 ACSA Every Child Counts Symposium Presented  by:    Nancy  A.  Dome,  Ed.D.     Dora  J.  Dome,  Esq   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 1   What is School-wide Positive Behavior Support (PBIS)? A systems approach for establishing the social culture and behavioral supports needed for a school to be an effective learning environment for all students. © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 2   What Does Culturally Responsive (CR) Add to the definition of PBIS? A systems approach to address enduring educational equity issues, such as the racialization of discipline and outcome disparities, and establishing the social culture and behavioral supports needed for a school to be safe, inclusive, and an effective learning environment for all students. © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 3 © 2014 DORA DOME LAW 1  
  4. 4. 1/8/14 © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 4   What Do you Make of the Data? Why are African American Students disciplined at a disproportionate rate? What beliefs do we hold about African American children that allow this disproportionality to continue? © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 5   Why CR? One  cannot  assume  that  interven0ons   intended  to  improve  behavior  will  be   effec0ve  to  the  same  degree  for  all   groups.   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 6 © 2014 DORA DOME LAW 2  
  5. 5. 1/8/14 Asking the Right Questions Thinking Historically, Acting Systemically What are the long-lasting cultural assumptions in the US education system that systematically shape school climate, rituals, and routines? How do we re-frame questions to understand the impact of school culture on disproportionality in discipline? What practices are needed to acknowledge cultural differences among people, histories, groups, and how they facilitate learning? © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 7   Understanding School Culture Core  Values   Heroes  and  Leaders   These  are  the  values  arDculated   and  understood  by  staff,   students,  and  parents   These  are  the  individuals   showcased  throughout  the   school   Rewards  &   Reinforcements   These  are  the  ways  behaviors   (good  &  bad)  are  reinforced.   Culture  Network   These  are  the  stories  told   around  the  school   ArDfacts   Rituals  &  Ceremonies   These  are  the  objects,  arDfacts,   costumes  and  other  physical   evidence  of  the  school  culture   These  are  the  daily  events   taking  place  in  the  school   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 8 Asking the Right Questions Thinking Systemically, Acting Personally   What are my school’s cultural practices related to student behavior and discipline? How does my school’s culture impact the disproportionality in our discipline data? What practices can our school undertake to effectively address disproportionality in discipline? © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 9 © 2014 DORA DOME LAW 3  
  6. 6. 1/8/14 Elements  of  CR  -­‐  PBIS   Social  Competence  &   Academic  Achievement   Cultural Equity OUTCOMES   SupporDng   Staff   Behavior   Cultural Knowledge and SelfAwareness SYSTEMS DATA Cultural Validity SupporDng   Decision-­‐ Making   PRACTICES Cultural   Relevance  and   ValidaDon   SupporDng  Student  Behavior   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 10   How do we integrate CR into our practice? •  Collaborate  with  families  and  community  members  in  teaching   and  reinforcing  school-­‐wide  behavioral  expectaDons.   •  Monitor  disproporDonality  between  dominant  and  non-­‐dominant   groups  by  collecDng  and  reviewing  disaggregated  student   disciplinary  data.   •  Provide  professional  development  aimed  at  increasing  awareness   of  differences  between  a  teacher’s  own  and  a  non-­‐dominant   student’s  cultural  paWerns  of  communicaDon  styles,  roles  of   authority,  etc.  that  improve  interpretaDon  of  problem  behaviors.   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 11 PBIS Component CR-PBIS DATA •  Understand the cultural practices of your school. •  Disaggregate data to highlight disproportionality in practice. SYSTEMS (Define and teach positive social expectations) •  Understand the cultural norms held by teachers, students, and parents. •  Involve the community in establishing social expectations. PRACTICES (supporting student behavior) •  Culturally responsive intervention, teaching & learning •  Inclusive and equitable learning community OUTCOMES (supporting social competence, academic achievement)   •  Communication with students, parents, and community to connect positive outcomes in schools to overall well-being throughout society. © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 12 © 2014 DORA DOME LAW 4  
  7. 7. 1/8/14 How do we know when we’re making progress? •  ShiX  from  teaching  desired  behaviors  to  creaDng   opportuniDes  to  learn.     •  ShiX  from  understanding  culture  as  a  variable  to  exploring  the   cultures  in  schools  as  contextual  mediators.     •  Expansion  of  viewing  PBIS  desired  outcomes  from  reducDons   in  referrals  to  encompassing  societal  interacDons  resulDng  in   greater  well-­‐being  for  all  students.   •  ShiX  from  cultural  assimilaDon  to  student,  family,  and   community  empowerment.   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 13   Action Plan Recognize It. •  Develop clear definitions of disproportionality. •  Disaggregate data to highlight disproportionality in practice. •  Conduct a School Climate Survey to understand the cultural perceptions regarding discipline that exist among staff, students, and parents. Interrupt It. •  Analyze disciplinary practices that result in predictable disproportionality. •  Involve the community in establishing social expectations. •  Balance zero tolerance policies and consideration of students’ intentions for misbehavior. •  Establish protocols for ongoing self-reflection to unmask unconscious racial and cultural bias. Repair It. •  Establish PBIS team that reflects district diversity (race, ethnicity, teachers, admins, special ed., families). •  Develop culturally responsive instructional and classroom management strategies and train teachers to use them. •  Seek alternative disciplinary approaches and procedures. •  Establish a learning community to connect positive outcomes in schools to overall well-being throughout society. •  Apprise the extent intervention works for all groups.   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 14 The Shift from this… Educators  most  o;en  assume  that  schools  work   and  that  students,  parents  and  community  need   to  change  to  conform  to  this  already  effec0ve  and   equitable  system.  —  Tara  J.  Yosso   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 15 © 2014 DORA DOME LAW 5  
  8. 8. 1/8/14 …to this The  moral  purpose  of  the  systemic  change  effort   via  CRPBIS  is  for  forming  safe,  posi0ve,   suppor0ve,  inclusive  school  cultures  for  ALL.  —   Equity  Alliance   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 16   THANK YOU! Dr.  Nancy  Dome   Pacific  EducaDonal  Group   nancy@pacificeducaDonalgroup.com   858.334.5260     Website:  hWp://pacificeducaDonalgroup.com     Dora  Dome  Law   610  16th  Street,  Suite  305   Oakland,  California  94612   510.464.DOME  (3663)  office   510.301.6667  cellular   510.291.9599  fax   ddome@doradomelaw.com  e-­‐mail   www.doradomelaw.com  web   © 2014 DORA DOME LAW p. 17 © 2014 DORA DOME LAW 6  

×