Blood brothers for Edexcel

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Blood brothers for Edexcel

  1. 1. Moderators rep explore character in 3 specific scenes, explore language in detail, no long cultural social intro, allow ‘up to’ 4 hours, justify teacher marks with annotations,
  2. 2. Mrs Johnston Act 1 • Mrs Johnstone’s life/background up to the start of the narrative (‘Marilyn Monroe 1’), pp.5–7 • Mrs Johnstone tells Mrs Lyons she’s having another baby, p.8 • Her reaction to finding creditors removing goods from the house (‘Living on the Never Never’), p.14 • Mrs Lyons ‘buys off’ Mrs Johnstone, pp.18–19 • Mrs Johnstone’s attitude to other ‘rough’ families, p.20 • Eddie tells Mrs J his family are moving away, pp.39–40 • Her feelings about moving to the country, p.44 Act 2 • Mrs J ‘hustles’ Mickey to the bus stop, pp.48–9 • Mickey and Eddie go to the cinema, pp.57–9 • Mrs Lyons visits Mrs J and threatens her, pp.59–60 • Mickey tells Mrs J that Linda’s pregnant and they are getting married, p.67 • Mrs J’s singing of ‘Marilyn Monroe 3’ (is she part of, or observing, the action?), pp.74–5 and ‘A Light Romance’, pp.77–8 • The council chamber (‘Tell Me It’s Not True’), pp.81–2 Mrs Lyons Act 1 • Mrs Lyons asks Mrs Johnstone to give her one of the twins, pp.10–13 • Mrs Lyons ‘buys off’ Mrs Johnstone, pp.18–19 • She tries to control who Edward is friends with, pp.28–9 • She panics when she thinks Edward has gone missing, p.35 Act 2 • Mrs Lyons teaches ‘Edward’ to ballroom-dance, p.47 • She sees Eddie’s locket, pp.52–3 • She threatens Mrs Johnstone, pp.59–60 • She shows Mickey Eddie and Linda together, p.79 http://web.brimsham.com/page_viewer.asp?page=Blood+Brothers&pid=409
  3. 3. Youtube Clips Part 1 Beginning Part 2 P12 Mothers prep for false preg. Part 3 P21 Mickey + Edward meet Part 4 P32 Mickey says the F word Part 5 P40 M + E say goodbye Part 6 (A2) P46 New house Part 7 P55 M + E compare each other Part 8 P63 Just 17,18 Part 9 P71 Grow up Eddie Part 10 P78 Eddie and Linda romance P12 end of ‘My Child’ song P21 Mickey told off for playing at posh end P31 ‘Cross your fingers’ kids play P40 Eddy says goodbye to Mrs J P45 J’s move house P54 M + L trying to get it on P63 Just 15 P71 I’ve got lots of money P77 The girl inside Linda (drugs) P83 Superstition or class (End)
  4. 4. Sound Characterisation - The Inspector In An Inspector Calls the main character is Inspector Goole. He is a mysterious character who comes to ask about a girls death. The Inspector arrives when Mr Birling is talking to Eric and Gerald about business and the country and how everybody has ‘to look after himself’ and not worry about everybody else. Goole also sounds like ghoul which is a ghost. At the end of the play he disappears like a ghost. The Inspector is described in the play as an older man ‘man in his fifties’ it also quotes that ‘he creates an impression of massiveness, solidity and purposefulness.’ This shows that he is an important character. The Inspector pretends to be a policeman and sometimes he speaks like a policeman ‘It’s my duty to ask questions’ but he does not always speak like a policeman, ‘There are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths’. Mrs Birling does not trust him and gets very angry with him. he has Eva Smiths diary which helps him ask the questions. The Inspector explains that Eva Smith/Daisy Renton killed herself with ‘disinfectant’ because of the way people had treated her getting her fired or making her pregnent. Firstly he questions Mr Birling about firing Eva from his factory because she wanted more money and went on strike. Mr Birling did not feel responsible for her death in a quote he says ‘I can’t accept any responsibility’. The Inspector tells him he has to. The Inspector then moves on to Sheila, who got her sacked from ‘Milwards’ because Sheila thought Eva was laughing at her. Unlike Mr Birling the Inspector makes her feel guilty about what she did. The Inspector is the voice of authority getting the other characters to think about what they have done. He knows the history of Eva Smith and the Birlings involvement in it, even though she died only hours ago. The next person he speaks to is Gerald who had an affair with Daisy and let her stay in a friends house. He saved her from ‘Alderman Megarty’ who was trying to pick her up in a bar. Gerald tells the Inspector that he felt sorry for her. It says in the text ‘I was sorry for her.’ The Inspector is not so tough on Gerald because Gerald is more honest. The Inspector then interviews Mrs Birling. In the play she is a ‘cold woman’ and she is a snob. She is rude to the Inspector and does not want to speak to him as she thinks she is to important. When he asks her questions she says in the play ‘what business is it of yours?’ and says the girl was to blame for killing herself ‘had only herself to blame.’ She is always on about responsibility. The Inspector challenges Mrs Birling, ‘Remember what you did Mrs Birling.’ The last person the Inspector talks to is Eric the son of Mr and Mrs Birling who met Daisy in a bar and went back to her flat where he raped her. The way the Inspector asks eric questions is not as aggressive as the questions he asks Mrs Birling. Eric is more sorry for what he has done because he tried to help her by stealing money from his dad. His final speech is like a politician. This is when Priestly uses the Inspector to give his message. He leaves the family with a message. A quotation that shows this is ‘We are responsible for each other’ and warns them of the ‘fire and blood and anguish’ this shows what they will get if they do not listen to what he has said to them. The Inspector is obviously in a great hurry at the end of the play it says in the text ‘I haven't much time.’ He leaves the other characters standing or sitting in silence because they are shocked. At the end of the play The Inspector has managed to change the way Eric and Sheila think but not Mr and Mrs Birling who are still selfish and worried about themselves. The Inspector is an important character as he tries to teach people a lesson about how we should behave. We must consider other people we meet and not treat them badly and be selfish. As an inspector he inspects the way the family have behaved to Eva. After he leaves like a ghost the Birlings find out a real inspector is soon arriving. Commentary The candidate has shown sound understanding of the character of Inspector Goole and selected textual details that are relevant. Although the essay follows a chronological account of the Inspector’s encounters with other characters, there are valid comments made on what impact he has on particular characters. The essay concludes with a neat summary of how the Inspector has managed to change Eric and Sheila, but not Mr and Mrs Birling, and why he is an important character. AO1 : A mark of 10 in the middle of Band 3 is appropriate. QWC is appropriate to the given Band.
  5. 5. Thorough and sustained Characterisation ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J.B.Priestley is set in 1912 and focuses around the Birling family. It is based in the fictional industrial city of Brumley. Mr Birling is a wealthy and successful business man, who has made a name for himself in the local community. His wife is also a prominent figure, who is a ‘prominent member – of the Brumley Women’s Charity Organization.’ Suggesting she is a respected woman who has a caring side, however the audience later find out that her position is to make her look good and have control within the local community. In the stage directions, Mrs Birling is initially described as a ‘rather cold woman and her husband’s social superior’ and Priestley conveys her as an unsympathetic character and out of touch with reality. She is portrayed as a snob and even corrects her husband when he complements the cook ‘(reproachfully) Arthur, you’re not supposed to say such things.’ Her attitude to hearing the news of the death was that, because Eva/daisy was not from their class, she should not deserve help, ‘A girl in her position.’ The irony used by Priestley to illustrate how Mrs Birling is influenced by social status is conveyed by her refusing to help Daisy Renton as she ‘didn’t like her manner.’ A charity should be caring for everyone, not judge people. Her lack of understanding is also shown towards her family, she still addresses her daughter as a ‘child’ and refuses to accept that Eric is a heavy drinker ‘no of course not. He’s only a boy.’ When the truth is revealed she cannot believe it and is ‘staggered’ asking Gerald ‘you know him, Gerald – and you’re a man – you must know it isn’t true.’ She tries to control her children by telling them to ‘be quiet.’ The overall impression you get of Mrs Birling is of a domineering woman, who does not like to be dominated or challenged by the Inspector. She continually tries to stand up to him, refusing to answer questions or even look at the photograph, ‘I don’t see any particular reason why I should.’ She tries to control the Inspector and bring his investigation to an end ‘I think we’ve just about come to an end of this wretched business.’ Even though she is the wife and socially subservient to her husband during this time period, she comes across as the more controlling character. Mrs Birling was the last person to see Eva Smith alive: Eva went in desperation to the charitable committee that she chaired, having nowhere else to turn. Mrs Birling admits that she ‘prejudiced’ the committee to turn down her application for help, leaving Eva Smith no real option but to commit suicide. Mrs Birling feels no guilt for what she did, telling the Inspector, ‘In the circumstances I think I was justified.’ Yet she cannot be held solely responsible for Eva’s death, because of the whole ‘chain of events’ that led to her meeting with Eva. As the Inspector forcefully tells the family just before he leaves ‘Each of you helped kill her.’ Mrs Birling herself reminds Mr Birling of his role in the tragedy: ‘Please remember that before you start accusing me of anything again that it wasn’t I who had her turned out of her employment – which probably began it.’ She refuses to see how her actions had anything to do with Eva’s death as ‘she had only herself to blame.’ She also suggests that it is the father of the child that is responsible ‘Go look for the father of the child. It’s his responsibility.’ Throughout the whole play she remains untouched by the Inspector’s questioning. It is only when she realises Eric was the father of the baby and that her actions have caused the death of her grandchild that she begins to show any signs of distress ‘But surely… I mean… it’s ridiculous…’ and she becomes ‘agitated’. Every time Mrs Birling is challenged by the Inspector she reacts in a very defensive manner, blaming everyone except herself. When it is mentioned that Eva was pregnant, she claims that the father ‘ should be made an example of…he ought to be dealt with very severely’ and she defensively adds that ‘It wasn’t I who had her turned out of her employment.’ Mr and Mrs Birling usually maintained a united front, however she must feel under a lot of pressure to speak to her husband so bitterly. Mrs Birling is right when she accuses her husband of starting the whole ‘sorry business’ as the sacking of Eva was the first step on the road to her death. When he first fired her, for asking for a modest rise, Eva, according to the Inspector, ‘was feeling desperate.’ She had little money, no work and few friends; had she kept her job, all would have been well. Mr Birling, though, like his wife, feels no remorse and states ‘I was quite justified.' In Act 3, after the Inspector has left, she returns to her domineering self and is proud that she ‘was the only one of you who didn’t give in to him’ straight away she takes the control and her husband agrees with her ‘You’re absolutely right, my dear.’ Her reaction following Gerald’s news that the Inspector did not exist is one of triumph ‘Didn’t I tell you… I couldn’t imagine a real police Inspector talking like that’ immediately she forgets the death of Daisy and is happy to go back to the way things were before. She even thinks the whole affair is a joke ‘in the morning they’ll be as amused as we are.’ Mrs Birling tries to remain untouched by the tragedy that occurs within the play. She wants to maintain the respectable and wealthy woman in society image, who like her husband is more concerned with how it will affect them, not how it has affected others, despite the Inspector’s comments that ‘we are all responsible’ for each other, Mrs Birling remains unaffected at the end of the play. Commentary The student has produced a secure and confidently written essay. The writing illustrates a thorough knowledge of the entire play and the student has made reference to the characters from all 3 Acts. Mention is also made to stage directions to show an awareness of writer’s craft. Although the textual references made throughout the essay support the perceptive points being made, more succinct textual referencing would improve the response . AO1 : A mark of 18 in the middle of Band 5 is appropriate. QWC is appropriate to the given Band.
  6. 6. Lesson 1
  7. 7. DO IT NOW… Write down 3 superstitions you know of Example – Don’t walk under a ladder
  8. 8. Introducing the play LO: 1 – To understand layers of meaning in the title 2 – To understand the learning objectives Layers of meaning – if we look under the surface, what do we associate with these words? Blood Brothers
  9. 9. LO: 1 – To understand layers of meaning in the title
  10. 10. What happens when we put the words together?
  11. 11. What do we understand from the image?
  12. 12. LO: 1 – To understand layers of meaning in the title
  13. 13. We will be studying a play by Willy Russell called Blood Brothers We will be looking at Plot Characters Setting Themes Writer In your planners, write down the name of the play and the elements we will be exploring. Homework – include all the above elements and create a fact file on the play.
  14. 14. The Aos: Respond to texts critically and imaginatively; select and evaluate relevant textual detail to illustrate and support interpretations Use the dictionaries and the thesauri to prepare a presentation on your given word from above
  15. 15. LO: 1 – To understand layers of meaning in the title
  16. 16. Lesson 2
  17. 17. DO IT NOW… List 5 superstitions - What types of people might believe in superstition? - Why might they believe in them? - Which of the two mothers do you think will be superstitious?
  18. 18. LO: to understand how Russell uses song and the narrator to shape our response
  19. 19. Reserve a page in your books to collect information on the two mothers. As you learn something new, record it. Record page numbers where you picked up info from.
  20. 20. Copy the question into your books: TASK Explore the ways in which an important character is developed in the drama Use evidence to support your answer. Stick in the mark scheme
  21. 21. Explore the ‘ways’… Remembering that Blood Brothers is a play, what does it mean by ‘ways’?
  22. 22. Dramatic Devices Motif - any recurring element in a story that has symbolic significance (Marilyn Monroe, guns, dancing...) Prologue – the introduction to a play (sets the scene) Narrator – tells the story and often comments on characters and events, knows how it will end Songs – often reflect a character’s thoughts – which character sings? Stage directions – setting, where a character is, what they are doing Dialogue – what they say Monologue – when a character talks to himself (reveals their thoughts) Contrasts – opposites Parallels – characters, events are similar Juxtaposition – placing of scenes next to each other (look for ones for effect- change from one house to the next...) Setting – the class divide Pace – the speed things happen (the play quickens near the end as if speeding through the story) Use of rhyme – in songs, prologue, the narrator – used for effect Language – look for metaphors etc.
  23. 23. Read to page 12 My Child song. Pairs/Groups 1 Look at the first song Mrs J sings How does this song shape our response to her? 2 Describe the relationship between the mothers at this point Why do the mothers share the song? 3 What is the role of the narrator? How does Russell use the narrator to present the mothers to the audience in the opening?
  24. 24. Independent Choose a mother and write a paragraph from paired discussion LO: to understand how Russell uses song and the narrator to shape our response
  25. 25. Lesson 3 Photocopy model PEE
  26. 26. DO IT NOW… What words/ideas do you associate with ‘evaluate’ and ‘tragedy’? evaluate tragedy
  27. 27. LO: to know how to use inference to evaluate our evidence
  28. 28. • She’s got a lot on her plate • She’s going to do something wicked • From Narrator we learn ‘so cruel… stone in place of her • From stage directions we heart’ learn ‘back to the • Wonder if she realises because she is preoccupied. audience’ Furthermore, the narrator has presented this information • She’s preoccupied with as rhetorical question which makes the reader suspicious something, attention that he isn’t stating facts. Finally, he asks us to ‘judge for elsewhere and misses yourselves’ and the audience might understand/be important events hooked by the enigma; thinking that she may not be as wicked as we are led to believe 1 - What band are these two students working at? 2 - What was the question that generated these answers?
  29. 29. TASK Explore the ways in which an important character is developed in the drama Use evidence to support your answer. What impression do we get of Mrs Johnston at this point in the play? Point: Give your opinion (Answer the question in one sentence) Evidence: Use words and short phrases to support your opinion + identify devices Explain/Evaluate: Explain how your evidence supports your point • She’s got a lot on her plate • From stage directions we learn ‘back to the audience’ • She’s preoccupied with something, attention elsewhere and misses important events *Enigma – mysterious/difficult to understand • She’s going to do something wicked • From Narrator we learn ‘so cruel… stone in place of her heart’ • Wonder if she realises because she is preoccupied. Furthermore, the narrator has presented this information as rhetorical question which makes the reader suspicious that he isn’t stating facts. Finally, he asks us to ‘judge for yourselves’ and the audience might understand/be hooked by the *enigma; thinking that she may not be as wicked as we are led to believe
  30. 30. Motif - any recurring element in a story that has symbolic significance (Marilyn Monroe, guns, dancing...) Prologue – the introduction to a play (sets the scene) Narrator – tells the story and often comments on characters and events, knows how it will end Songs – often reflect a character’s thoughts – which character sings? Stage directions – setting, where a character is, what they are doing Dialogue – what they say Monologue – when a character talks to himself (reveals their thoughts) Contrasts – opposites Parallels – characters, events are similar Juxtaposition – placing of scenes next to each other (look for ones for effect- change from one house to the next...) Setting – the class divide Pace – the speed things happen (the play quickens near the end as if speeding through the story) Use of rhyme – in songs, prologue, the narrator – used for effect Language – look for metaphors etc.
  31. 31. Read play to pg 19 up to Narrator’s song Shoes upon the Table How do we feel about Mrs Johnston when she explains the missing twin to her family? P: State your opinion – How do we feel about her? Ev: Support with relevant evidence (device and quote) Ex: Evaluate your evidence – Why do we feel this way about her now? What motivates Mrs Lyons to sack the mother? What is she thinking but what does she say? P: State your opinion - What is motivating her? Ev: Support with relevant evidence (device and quote) Ex: Evaluate the evidence – How do we feel about her actions? How does Mrs Lyons manipulate Mrs Johnston into not telling anyone what has happened? P: State your opinion – How does she manipulate Mrs J. Ev: Support with relevant evidence (device and quote) Ex: Evaluate the evidence – How is this an effective way to manipulate Mrs J.
  32. 32. In what ways are the mothers’ lives shaped by events outside their control?
  33. 33. Lesson 4
  34. 34. Add 3 words, to describe each of the mothers, to the tables in your books. And descriptions they share? Mrs Johnston Both Mrs Lyons Prepare to support with evidence from the play
  35. 35. LO: To write PEE paragraphs, that meet the assessment objectives, to explore the mothers’ reactions to the others’ son. Prediction – In pairs, discuss: How will Mrs Lyons react to Mickey? How will Mrs Johnston react to Eddie?
  36. 36. When reading P19 – 34: Record quotes from the meeting between Mrs L and M And, from the meeting between Mrs J and E To hit ‘Band 5 – Perceptive…’ you will need to show you are!
  37. 37. P 26-27 - PEE – How does Mrs J react to meeting Eddie? P: Mrs Johnston seems shocked and then scared when she finds out Mickey and Eddie have been playing together Ev: The writer exaggerates her shock by Mickey’s dialogue; he innocently introduces Eddie as ‘my brother’ Ex: The irony is that, although Mickey doesn’t know it, they are brothers and Mrs Johnston might have feared for a moment that the secret was out. EV: When she says ‘Does your mother know..’, Ex: She is showing she understands Mrs Lyons would not be happy; the threat of upsetting her raises the fear of superstition and the pact they made when she swore on the bible.
  38. 38. 1 - Use your own evidence (and/or evidence from P 2829) to explore how Mrs Lyons reacts when she meets Mickey (PEE) 2 – On P34, through the use of narrator and song, what does the writer suggest about Mrs Lyons’ state of mind; She’s well educated so why would she be affected by superstition?
  39. 39. LO: To write PEE paragraphs, that meet the assessment objectives, to explore the mothers’ reactions to the others’ son. H/W - Watch Youtube! Blood Brothers Part 1 to Part 10
  40. 40. Lesson 5 Photocopy word bank
  41. 41. DO IT NOW… Put into order, from ‘strongly agree’ to ‘strongly disagree’ Blood Brothers is about: • How hard life was in 1980s Liverpool • The contrasts between a working-class and a rich woman • How the class system affects people’s life chances • How superstition governs our lives • Raising children • The role of women in society
  42. 42. LO: To understand how the writer creates characters to reflect his own ideas
  43. 43. How many of these words can you use in a single, accurate sentence about the mothers in Blood Brothers? Common bond Vicious Distraught Secret Weakness Burden Tragedy Love of children Beyond reason Grief Class Strength Crave Disappointmen t Makes mistakes Madness Pain Status Balance Resilient Fear Desperate Equaliser Sanity Superstition Equality Education Ignorance Jealousy Protecting Corrupting Grinding poverty Wealth Opportunity Contrasts Guilt Truth Betrayal Trapped Honesty Optimistic Inevitable
  44. 44. Take notes on the mothers when reading P34 – 45 How does the writer contrast the experiences of the two mothers? • What are the parallels that happen in this section? • How do they happen differently? • What is the writer saying about the effects of class/superstitious belief? • • The policeman’s attitude towards the two families The mothers’ reactions to their new homes.
  45. 45. Now, make a point about the writer’s ideas using words from table. Back them up with evidence and explain your evidence. Common bond Vicious Distraught Secret Weakness Burden Tragedy Love of children Beyond reason Grief Class Strength Crave Disappointme nt Makes mistakes Madness Pain Status Balance Resilient Fear Desperate Equaliser Sanity Superstition Equality Education Ignorance Jealousy Protecting Corrupting Grinding poverty Wealth Opportunity Contrasts Guilt Truth Betrayal Trapped Honesty Optimistic Inevitable
  46. 46. LO: To understand how the writer creates characters to reflect his own ideas How many of the 10 Youtube clips have you watched so far?
  47. 47. Lesson 5
  48. 48. DO IT NOW… Write one short sentence for each of the 5 key points of the narrative structure 1 – Equilibrium (what life is like at the opening of the play) 2 – Development (what we learn about characters/setting) 3 – Complication(s) (tension/problems that build up) 4 – Climax (the height of tension) 5 – New equilibrium (what life is like at the end of the play) You may have to predict if you haven’t finished watching.
  49. 49. LO: To understand how the structure of the play shapes our response to the mothers
  50. 50. When reading P45-67, take notes on the relationships Mrs J and Mrs L have with their own sons.
  51. 51. In pairs, give a rating of 1 to 10 where 10 is high and explain at which point in the play you are linking it to: Mrs Lyons is a victim Mrs Johnston is a victim Mrs Lyons is jealous Mrs Johnston is jealous Mrs Lyons behaves appallingly Mrs Johnston behaves appallingly Mrs Lyons is the cause of conflict Mrs Johnston is the cause of conflict Mrs Lyons is brave Mrs Johnston is brave
  52. 52. With evidence, bullet point/mind map the changing impressions of ONE of the mothers throughout the play. How do the audience react at different points? 1 – What is happening at that point? 2 – What is the impression of the mother? 3 – How do the audience react (thoughts/feelings)?
  53. 53. LO: To understand how the structure of the play shapes our response to the mothers
  54. 54. Lesson 6
  55. 55. DO IT NOW… List 3 things, for each mother, that get ‘taken away’. How do they react in each circumstance?
  56. 56. LO: To understand the writer’s intentions at the end of the play
  57. 57. When reading P68 – end, record what roles the mothers play in the conclusion of the play
  58. 58. The ingredients for the end of the play are A narrator A question A mother (only one) A song An old movie 1 - What was the writer’s intention(s)? 2 - What is your personal response to the narrator’s question?
  59. 59. LO: To understand the writer’s intentions at the end of the play
  60. 60. Lesson 7 Photocopy model answer
  61. 61. DO IT NOW… Skim read this model answer… Same question, different novel Characterisation ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J.B.Priestley is set in 1912 and focuses around the Birling family. It is based in the fictional industrial city of Brumley. Mr Birling is a wealthy and successful business man, who has made a name for himself in the local community. His wife is also a prominent figure, who is a ‘prominent member – of the Brumley Women’s Charity Organization.’ Suggesting she is a respected woman who has a caring side, however the audience later find out that her position is to make her look good and have control within the local community. In the stage directions, Mrs Birling is initially described as a ‘rather cold woman and her husband’s social superior’ and Priestley conveys her as an unsympathetic character and out of touch with reality. She is portrayed as a snob and even corrects her husband when he complements the cook ‘(reproachfully) Arthur, you’re not supposed to say such things.’ Her attitude to hearing the news of the death was that, because Eva/daisy was not from their class, she should not deserve help, ‘A girl in her position.’ The irony used by Priestley to illustrate how Mrs Birling is influenced by social status is conveyed by her refusing to help Daisy Renton as she ‘didn’t like her manner.’ A charity should be caring for everyone, not judge people. Her lack of understanding is also shown towards her family, she still addresses her daughter as a ‘child’ and refuses to accept that Eric is a heavy drinker ‘no of course not. He’s only a boy.’ When the truth is revealed she cannot believe it and is ‘staggered’ asking Gerald ‘you know him, Gerald – and you’re a man – you must know it isn’t true.’ She tries to control her children by telling them to ‘be quiet.’ The overall impression you get of Mrs Birling is of a domineering woman, who does not like to be dominated or challenged by the Inspector. She continually tries to stand up to him, refusing to answer questions or even look at the photograph, ‘I don’t see any particular reason why I should.’ She tries to control the Inspector and bring his investigation to an end ‘I think we’ve just about come to an end of this wretched business.’ Even though she is the wife and socially subservient to her husband during this time period, she comes across as the more controlling character. Mrs Birling was the last person to see Eva Smith alive: Eva went in desperation to the charitable committee that she chaired, having nowhere else to turn. Mrs Birling admits that she ‘prejudiced’ the committee to turn down her application for help, leaving Eva Smith no real option but to commit suicide. Mrs Birling feels no guilt for what she did, telling the Inspector, ‘In the circumstances I think I was justified.’ Yet she cannot be held solely responsible for Eva’s death, because of the whole ‘chain of events’ that led to her meeting with Eva. As the Inspector forcefully tells the family just before he leaves ‘Each of you helped kill her.’ Mrs Birling herself reminds Mr Birling of his role in the tragedy: ‘Please remember that before you start accusing me of anything again that it wasn’t I who had her turned out of her employment – which probably began it.’ She refuses to see how her actions had anything to do with Eva’s death as ‘she had only herself to blame.’ She also suggests that it is the father of the child that is responsible ‘Go look for the father of the child. It’s his responsibility.’ Throughout the whole play she remains untouched by the Inspector’s questioning. It is only when she realises Eric was the father of the baby and that her actions have caused the death of her grandchild that she begins to show any signs of distress ‘But surely… I mean… it’s ridiculous…’ and she becomes ‘agitated’. Every time Mrs Birling is challenged by the Inspector she reacts in a very defensive manner, blaming everyone except herself. When it is mentioned that Eva was pregnant, she claims that the father ‘ should be made an example of…he ought to be dealt with very severely’ and she defensively adds that ‘It wasn’t I who had her turned out of her employment.’ Mr and Mrs Birling usually maintained a united front, however she must feel under a lot of pressure to speak to her husband so bitterly. Mrs Birling is right when she accuses her husband of starting the whole ‘sorry business’ as the sacking of Eva was the first step on the road to her death. When he first fired her, for asking for a modest rise, Eva, according to the Inspector, ‘was feeling desperate.’ She had little money, no work and few friends; had she kept her job, all would have been well. Mr Birling, though, like his wife, feels no remorse and states ‘I was quite justified.' In Act 3, after the Inspector has left, she returns to her domineering self and is proud that she ‘was the only one of you who didn’t give in to him’ straight away she takes the control and her husband agrees with her ‘You’re absolutely right, my dear.’ Her reaction following Gerald’s news that the Inspector did not exist is one of triumph ‘Didn’t I tell you… I couldn’t imagine a real police Inspector talking like that’ immediately she forgets the death of Daisy and is happy to go back to the way things were before. She even thinks the whole affair is a joke ‘in the morning they’ll be as amused as we are.’ Mrs Birling tries to remain untouched by the tragedy that occurs within the play. She wants to maintain the respectable and wealthy woman in society image, who like her husband is more concerned with how it will affect them, not how it has affected others, despite the Inspector’s comments that ‘we are all responsible’ for each other, Mrs Birling remains unaffected at the end of the play. Commentary The student has produced a secure and confidently written essay. The writing illustrates a thorough knowledge of the entire play and the student has made reference to the characters from all 3 Acts. Mention is also made to stage directions to show an awareness of writer’s craft. Although the textual references made throughout the essay support the perceptive points being made, more succinct textual referencing would improve the response . AO1 : A mark of 18 in the middle of Band 5 is appropriate. QWC is appropriate to the given Band.
  62. 62. LO: To understand how to structure my answer Find evidence to justify the model answer being Band 4
  63. 63. Using 3 highlighters, identify where the student 1. Makes a point 2. Uses evidence and/or identifies a device 3. Analyses the evidence
  64. 64. How does this student structure his answer? Write one or two bullet points to explain what he does in each paragraph
  65. 65. Look at the notes you have in your book from the last 6 lessons. Using bullet points/a spider diagram, plan an answer to the task for Blood Brothers: TASK Explore the ways in which an important character is developed in the drama. Use evidence to support your answer.
  66. 66. LO: To understand how to structure my answer
  67. 67. Lesson 8 Photocopy model answer
  68. 68. DO IT NOW… Read and grade this student opening. (Compare it to the model you were given last lesson) Blood Brothers is a musical about twins who were separated at birth. One stays with his birth mother and struggles in a working class family. The other is given to a rich woman and he has the privileges of a wealthy upbringing. The twins dies at the end when they find out they were separated at birth. This makes a superstition made up by the rich mother, Mrs Lyons, come true. I will be writing about the ways Mrs Johnston is presented to the audience. Willy Russell introduces the character of Mrs Johnstone in the production note at the start of the play. Although she is not described, her house . . . This creates the impression that . . and suggests . . . When
  69. 69. LO: To understand how to write a strong opening
  70. 70. Move this opening – from mediocre to marvellous… Blood Brothers is a musical about twins who were separated at birth. One stays with his birth mother and struggles in a working class family. The other is given to a rich woman and he has the privileges of a wealthy upbringing. The twins dies at the end when they find out they were separated at birth. This makes a superstition made up by the rich mother, Mrs Lyons, come true. I will be writing about the ways Mrs Johnston/Lyons is presented to the audience. Willy Russell introduces the character of Mrs Johnston/Lyons in the production note at the start of the play. Although she is not described, her house . . . This creates the impression that . . and suggests . . . When
  71. 71. LO: To understand how to write a strong opening
  72. 72. Lesson 9
  73. 73. DO IT NOW… Check the content of your opening. Have you used PEE? • Made some points? • Used detailed textual evidence? • Identified effective playwright’s devices? • Thoroughly evaluated textual evidence and devices?
  74. 74. LO: To develop my response using the assessment criteria TASK Explore the ways in which an important character is developed in the drama. Use evidence to support your answer.

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