E3 alliance food for thought the attendance challenge 7.17.12

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  • The Central Texas Attendance Challenge: Leading the State in Chronic Absences

    Learn how you can get involved in a Fall Attendance Campaign targeting Central Texas middle and high school students

    For students to learn, we first have to get them to school. Unfortunately, school attendance is a major issue in Central Texas, especially in high school. On average, high school students are missing more than two weeks of school, and seniors miss nearly three weeks in our area! Even worse, Central Texas students are absent more than the Texas average! In this Food For Thought we will address issues with attendance at all grade levels and across different student populations.
    We’ll share alarming data on student outcomes in Central Texas associated with poor attendance and the impact of absences on Central Texas school funding. We’ll also preview a Fall Attendance Challenge Campaign set to kick-off this fall.
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E3 alliance food for thought the attendance challenge 7.17.12

  1. 1. E3 Alliance Food for Thought:The Central Texas Attendance Challenge July 17, 2012
  2. 2. WELCOME! #E3allianceFFT facebook.com/E3Alliance.org
  3. 3. What we’ll talk about today• Alarming data and research about student absences in Central Texas• Share attendance improvement key learnings from Central Texas school districts• Hear what students say about chronic absences• Announce a cutting-edge attendance campaign• Get your feedback and answer your questions!
  4. 4. Data Analysis, Focus Groups,Collaborative Design and Logic Modeling Supported by:
  5. 5. Amy Wiseman, Ph.D., E3 Alliance Sr. Research AssociateWHAT DOES THE DATA TELL USABOUT ABSENCES IN OUR REGION?
  6. 6. Overview• Absences: Who, what, where, when and how many• Academic outcomes that correlate with poor attendance• What we can do about it
  7. 7. What do we Mean by Absences?• Student not at school when attendance taken• Does not matter if excused or unexcused – School loses funding for that student that day• Exceptions: – At school board sanctioned activity – At Doctor’s appointment with note – About 10 additional reasons• Chronic absenteeism: miss 10% or more days Source: Texas Education Code © 2012 E3 Alliance
  8. 8. ? Absences in Central Texas per YearSource: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center; 2010-2011 school year. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  9. 9. 2.4 Million Absences in Central Texas per YearSource: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center; 2010-2011 school year. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  10. 10. Half of Central Texas Students Miss Six orMore Class Days per Year Percentage of Students 5 6 or Fewer or More Missed Days Missed Days Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  11. 11. But Account for 85% of all Absences Percentage of Students Percentage of Absences 85% 5 6 of Absences or Fewer or More Missed Days Missed Days 15% Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  12. 12. The Fewest Absences are in Grades 3 to 5 Absences in Central Texas 2009-10 14Average Days Absent 12 10 8 6 Central Texas Texas 4 2 0 KG 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Grade Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  13. 13. Central Texas has More Absences than Texas on Average Absences in 2009-10 14Average Days Absent 12 10 8 6 Central Texas Texas 4 2 0 KG 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Grade Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  14. 14. High School Students Miss More than Two Weeks Days Absent in Central Texas in 2009-10 15Average Days Absent 10 11.3 5 6.6 7.4 0 Elementary School Middle School High School Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  15. 15. The Jump in Absences Happens Between 8th and 9th Grade Absences in Central Texas, 2009-2010 14 14Average Days Absent 12 3 Days More 10 11 11 10 8 8 8 6 7 4 2 0 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Grade Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  16. 16. Areas of AustinISD with theMost MiddleSchool AbsencesPrimarily East ofI35 © 2012 E3 Alliance Source: Children’s Optimal Health
  17. 17. ChronicAbsenteeism inHigh School SpreadAcross Much ofDistrict © 2012 E3 Alliance Source: Children’s Optimal Health
  18. 18. Student with Lowest Income Miss Most Days Absences Central Texas High Schools, 2009-10 18 16 Average Days Absent 14 15 12 10 11 8 9 6 4 2 0 Non-low Income Reduced Price Lunch Free Lunch Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  19. 19. Asian Students Miss Fewest Days of School Absences Central Texas High Schools, 2009-10 18 16Average Days Absent 14 12 13 14 10 8 9 6 4 6 2 0 Asian Black Hispanic White Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  20. 20. Poorest Students Have Six Additional Absences on Average Absences Central Texas High Schools, 2009-10 18 16Average Days Absent 14 16 16 15 12 10 12 11 11 8 10 10 8 6 7 4 5 6 2 0 Non-Low Income Reduced Price Lunch Free Lunch Asian Black Hispanic White Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  21. 21. WHAT OUTCOMES CORRELATEWITH POOR ATTENDANCE? © 2012 E3 Alliance
  22. 22. Grade 9 Retention is Dramatic 2010-11 Central Texas Students 30,000 9th Grade Bubble 25,000Student Enrollment 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 - PK KG Gr1 Gr2 Gr3 Gr4 Gr5 Gr6 Gr7 Gr8 Gr9 Gr10 Gr11 Gr12 Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  23. 23. Grade 9 Retention is Dramatic 2010-11 Central Texas Students 30,000 Retained Students 25,000Student Enrollment 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 - PK KG Gr1 Gr2 Gr3 Gr4 Gr5 Gr6 Gr7 Gr8 Gr9 Gr10 Gr11 Gr12 Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  24. 24. Retained Students had Four Times MoreAbsences Absences for First Time 9th Graders 25 24Average Days Absent 20 15 10 5 6 0 Retained in 9th Promoted to 10th Status in Next School Year Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center; First time 9th graders in 2006-7 © 2012 E3 Alliance
  25. 25. Only 17% of Retained Freshmen PassedTAKS Math TAKS Math Passing Rate 100%Percentage Passing TAKS 80% 60% 57-point difference 74% 40% 20% 17% 0% Retained in 9th Promoted to 10th Status in Next School Year Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center; First time 9th graders in 2006-7 © 2012 E3 Alliance
  26. 26. Students Retained in 9th Grade 10X MoreLikely to Drop Out Percentage of Cohort that Dropped OutPercentage of 9th Grade Cohort 20% 18% 16% 18.3% 14% 10X 12% 10% Difference 8% 6% 4% 1.7% 2% 0% Retained in 9th Promoted to 10th Status in Next School Year Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center; First time 9th graders in 2006-7 © 2012 E3 Alliance
  27. 27. 10% of First Time Freshmen are Retained 2007-8 Student status Retained in 9th 10% Promoted to 10th 90% Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  28. 28. The 10% Retained 9th Graders Account forHalf of Dropouts 2007-8 Student status Dropouts by retention status Retained in 9th 10% Retained Promoted in 9th to 10th 49% 51% Promoted to 10th 90% Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center. © 2012 E3 Alliance
  29. 29. Absences and 9th Grade Retention Correspond to Dropping Out Absences During Grade 9 35 33Average Days Absent 30 25 20 22 15 Not dropout 10 14 Dropout 5 6 0 Retained in 9th Promoted to 10th Status in Next School Year Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT Education Research Center; First time 9th graders in 2006-7 © 2012 E3 Alliance
  30. 30. 3 DAYS =$34 MILLION
  31. 31. WHAT CAN WE DO TO INCREASEATTENDANCE?
  32. 32. National Literature Review Shows Patternsbut Little Evidence • School based, clinic/community based and court based interventions somewhat effective – But do not differ in overall effectiveness • Student based behavioral strategies effective – Contracting, incentives, social skills training – Even more effective with parent training • School based attendance groups also effective • Mentoring and family therapy not very effective Source: Maynard et al. (2011) Meta-analysis of interventions to increase school attendance © 2012 E3 Alliance
  33. 33. Need to Know the ‘Why’ on Absences• Broad categories of absences (Balfanz & Byrnes, 2012) – Can’t – illness or other responsibilities – Don’t – school refusers often due to bullying – Won’t – skipping• Need to know the ‘Why’ in Central Texas – Working on getting absence reason codes from partner school districts © 2012 E3 Alliance
  34. 34. Future Research and Analysis• Reason Code analysis – Specific reason code frequency and pattern – Mapped to programs or interventions we control• Regional mapping of hotspots by Children’s Optimal Health• Longitudinal Tracking of absences• Relationship between student and teacher absenteeism• Working with partners to obtain funding © 2012 E3 Alliance
  35. 35. Launching Attendance Campaign Based on Data• Worst attendance in High School• Jump in absences between 8th and 9th grade• No gender differences in attendance• Targeting all children in 7th through 10th grades – Begins before jump in absences and continues through High School when easier to influence © 2012 E3 Alliance
  36. 36. CONVERSATION AND QUESTIONS
  37. 37. Rick L’Amie, Director of Communications, E3 AllianceIMPROVING STUDENT ATTENDANCE:WHAT CAN WE DO? © 2012 E3 Alliance
  38. 38. Background• Central Texas superintendents chose increased attendance as #1 way community and funders could assist districts: 1. “Triple Bottom Line” benefit: • Students can learn when in class • Teachers have more time to teach • Increased revenue to districts 2. Unlike teacher quality or curriculum, communities can directly contribute to student and district success• E3 Alliance spearheading regional approach to increase attendance © 2012 E3 Alliance
  39. 39. Vicious or Virtuous Cycle? Poor Low income Student Academic Shorter lifespanAbsences Achievement Unhealthy behavior © 2012 E3 Alliance
  40. 40. FOCUSING ON ATTENDANCE:KEY LEARNINGS
  41. 41. Inventory of Local Districts (ongoing)• Leander: Hope Committee – 5 consecutive days absent at any grade triggers response by district “Hope Committee” – Adults problem solve with student to stay in school• Austin: Multi-faceted investigation – Working through ACCESS project – Elementary: Families move & don’t re-enroll – Secondary: Students work to support families & what that actually means! © 2012 E3 Alliance
  42. 42. Pflugerville Attendance Effort• Started in Fall 2011; informed by H-E-B ISD program• Central message & outreach: Attendance: It Counts! – Posters + magnets + messages on campus & district mail – Tied-in funding message: 1% gain gets us over $1M!• Two full-time attendance outreach coordinators – Identify students, notify parents, home visits, family interventions, truancy court – On site @ each MS & HS campus 1 day/week• Consolidated 3 truancy courts to 1 (Judge Bass)• Major take-aways: − Follow-through creates community buzz − Relationships are crucial © 2012 E3 Alliance
  43. 43. Pflugerville Attendance Effort• Started in Fall 2011; informed by H-E-B ISD program• Central message & outreach: Attendance: It Counts! – Posters + magnets + messages on campus & district mail – Tied-in funding message: 1% gain gets us over $1M!• Two full-time attendance outreach coordinators – Identify students, notify parents, home visits, family interventions, truancy court – On site @ each MS & HS campus 1 day/week• Consolidated 3 truancy courts to 1 (Judge Bass)• Major take-aways: − Follow-through creates community buzz − Relationships are crucial © 2012 E3 Alliance
  44. 44. District Attendance Survey• Approximately 2/3 of respondents have done some kind of attendance campaign in the last six years• The main messages of attendance campaigns: – Student Success is Directly Related to Student Attendance – District Funding is Directly Related to Student Attendance• Campaigns included: – Parent communications, campus data collection, community “sweeps” for missing students, home visits, hiring of attendance specialists, partnerships with courts, robocalls, etc.
  45. 45. Outcome: Most respondents felt that theircampaign worked, but they do not have the data to support it
  46. 46. Regional Attendance Insights• Austin ISD – 6 days > mobility• Leander ISD – 10 days = dropouts• Hays CISD – Reporting out absence data to campuses• Del Valle ISD – Teacher absences = student absences © 2012 E3 Alliance
  47. 47. CONVERSATION AND QUESTIONS
  48. 48. WHAT DO STUDENTS THINK?
  49. 49. Student Focus Groups• E3 Alliance conducted student focus groups in Pflugerville middle and high school AVID classes and with rural and urban CIS high school students• Asked about: 1. attendance awareness & attitudes 2. media/entertainment attitudes & opinions © 2012 E3 Alliance
  50. 50. Student Focus Groups• CIS High School Students – Think “skipping” is big problem • Drags down class; material has to be repeated • Being in class creates responsible job habits • Need education to get a job – Why do kids miss school? • Bad influences, hang with a bad crowd • No positive pressure at home to attend • Classes too long, boring • Have to work • Care for family • Transportation not the cause © 2012 E3 Alliance
  51. 51. Student Focus Groups• CIS High School Students – Think a campaign might help increase attendance • Has to be relevant; not stupid • Robocalls might work – Celebrities/singers – hip hop – Not athletes • Incentives would work – Concerts – Food • Peer pressure would work • Posters & contests wouldn’t work © 2012 E3 Alliance
  52. 52. Student Focus Groups• Pflugerville AVID High School Students – Aware that chronic absences are a problem • Schools don’t get paid if kids go missing • That means extra curricular, specialty courses might get cut – Attending school is important • Learn, get an education • Make more money; be successful • Won’t be able to go to college if you skip school and drop out © 2012 E3 Alliance
  53. 53. Student Focus Groups• Pflugerville AVID High School Students – What would work to increase attendance? • Day care on campus • Announcements • Music/rap contests • Group discussions • Incentives: food, music • Celebrity calls probably wouldn’t work © 2012 E3 Alliance
  54. 54. Student Focus Groups• Pflugerville AVID Middle School Students – Aware that chronic attendance is a problem – Causes include • Bullying • Good excuse to turn in late assignments • Care for sick family members • Have to work • Peer pressure – More open to traditional school outreach © 2012 E3 Alliance
  55. 55. WHAT’S THE PLAN?
  56. 56. A Two-Pronged Approach 1 • TBD based on reason codes, Changes in school and district Lit reviews, local data: systems incentives, engaged teaching,School, hired attendance staff, etc.SystemsChanges 2 Healthcare • TBD based on reason codes, resources & access Access to partners for students Leverage RWJF grant 3 • Target “low hanging fruit” Broad awareness & • Thru business & partners education outreach • Print media, op edsCommunity • 3 Days = $34M!! Outreach 4 Targeted attendance • Target 7th-10th graders & parents campaign to • Relevant, targeted messages adolescents & • Radio, billboards, social media parents • Tied to events, robocalls © 2012 E3 Alliance
  57. 57. A 7-week challenge to improve attendance rates and motivatestudents …using a mix of sizzle and substance
  58. 58. Targeted Attendance Campaign• Partnerhips – Incite “social impact marketing” unit of Emmis Communications • KLBJ AM/FM, BOB FM, “La Z” 107.1, 101X, KGSR, Comedy – Get Schooled • National not for profit with successful track record – E3 Alliance and Member school districts • AISD, Bastrop, Del Valle, Hays, Leander, Pflugerville, Round Rock, San Marcos
  59. 59. Incite Targeted Attendance Campaign• Audiences – Students in 7-10 grades – Parents of at-risk students – Educators (School leadership, teachers, guidance counselors, etc.) – Community at-large (businesses, government entities, influencers, etc.)
  60. 60. Targeted Attendance CampaignGoals – Elevate awareness about the importance of attendance among participating middle and high school students, teachers and parents – Improve attendance and inspire student engagement in the participating middle and high schools – Connect with new and existing community based partnerships aimed at boosting attendance across the Central Texas community
  61. 61. So how does it work?SIZZLE
  62. 62. Activations and Attendance = Winner• Wake Up Calls• Nominate an Inspiring Teacher• On the Hunt• iPlay
  63. 63. Activations and Attendance = Winner• Students earn points each time they participate in an activation• Motivated by incentives, internal activities• “Winning” school will be determined based on engagement points and attendance gains – Regional – National
  64. 64. Fall 2011 Attendance Challenge17 states represented88 schools participating90,000 students involved
  65. 65. Attendance Challenge Timeline• Phase One: July - August – Coordinate with districts and campuses – Incite to coordinate media buys/sponsor – Facilitate broad awareness outreach partnerships• Phase Two: August - October – Aug 27 – Create BUZZ: Wake up calls launch, early promotion• Phase Three: Attendance Challenge – Oct. 1 to Dec. 7 • Attendance Challenge • Radio outreach and promotions
  66. 66. Attendance Challenge Timeline• Phase Four: December- January – December • Calculate scores – December - January • Regional winner and events • National winner and “prize”
  67. 67. CONVERSATION AND QUESTIONS
  68. 68. What’s Next?• Campaign is just the beginning• More research & analysis needed• Collaboration around best practices in schools, justice and health infrastructure Need community & corporate support behind campaign & media outreach• Ultimate goals: Improved student performance Increased financial support to schools
  69. 69. The Next Food For Thought: Wed. Sept. 19THIRD GRADE READING: PUTTINGIT ALL TOGETHER FOR SUCCESS
  70. 70. E3alliance.org #E3allianceFFT facebook.com/E3Alliance.org

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