CTX Economy

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  • SD Starts Off
  • Source: TEA, TxDOT, TNRIS?
  • Source: E3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at UT ERC?
  • Dropouts from 2011 will cost $18B. http://www.all4ed.org/files/Texas_hs.pdf
  • Hannah does “get” this slide. This slide needs a DATE!! And what the source is!Emigration is 84.6% of Immigration.
  • ACS Survey too???
  • Source:ACSHS grads include GED, Some college includes AA degrees, College Grads includes bacc and post-bacc.
  • http://www.texasahead.org/economy/forecasts/fcst0910/fiscalSummary.html -- Projections
  • Is the source the TWC – is this correct?Office and Administrative SupportSales and Related Food Preparation and Serving RelatedEducation, Training and Library Occupations
  • http://www.texasindustryprofiles.com/apps/swap/asp/naicIndex.asp
  • http://www.texasindustryprofiles.com/apps/swap/asp/socTable.asp20 out of 43 are in the STEM fields(employment for these occupations is expected to increase 23%)Projected employment demands through 2018 due to industry growth or employee turnover from 2008 to 2018
  • http://www.everychanceeverytexan.org/texasjobs/
  • These were takes from the 8 County Profile created from Socrates (2/15/12) cmb
  • CTX Economy

    1. 1. 2012 Central Texas Profile Made possible through the investment of: www.e3alliance.org
    2. 2. CENTRAL TEXAS FACTS &FIGURES
    3. 3. E3 Alliance Regional Scope of Work © E3 Alliance, 2012
    4. 4. All Schools in Central Texas © E3 Alliance, 2012
    5. 5. Central Texas Schools and Student Enrollment, 2011-2012 Schools Students 35 Independent School Districts 443 299,738 15 Charter Organizations 37 6,978 Total = 480 306,716Source: © E3 Alliance, 2012
    6. 6. Economics: Texas Highlights • The 129,000 high school dropouts from the Class of 2011 will cost the Texas economy $18 Billion in lost wages over their lifetimes* • If half of these students had graduated, they would provide Texas $61 million in increased annual state tax revenue* • If Texas’ high schools were to graduate all students ready for college, the state would likely save as much as $462 million in college remediation costs and lost earnings***Source: Alliance for Excellent Education (Alliance), “The High Cost of High School Dropouts,” 2011**Source: Alliance, “Saving Now and Saving Later,” 2011 © E3 Alliance, 2012
    7. 7. Migration into Texas • The population of Texas is over 25 million – 85% of population growth is due to new births – 15% of population growth is due to immigration • 74% of immigration comes from U.S.A. Texas Population Domestic Increase (2009 to 2010) International 0 150,000 300,000 450,000 600,000 750,000Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2010 © E3 Alliance, 2012
    8. 8. Texas Immigration vs. Emigration Texas Immigration vs. Emigration 600,000 Number of People Moving 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 ??? 0 Other State Other Country Immigrants EmigrantsSource: © E3 Alliance, 2012
    9. 9. Central Texans Have Higher Levels of Education than the State Average Educational Attainment for Adult Population (18 years and older), 2010 Texas Central Texas Less than Less than High College High School, 1 Graduate, School, 1 College 3% 23% 9% Graduate, 35% High School Graduate, High 20% Some School College, 3 Graduate, Some 1% 26% College, 3 2%Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2010 © E3 Alliance, 2012
    10. 10. More Adults Have “Some” College, but Degree Attainment Has Fallen Educational Attainment for Adult Population, Central Texas 2003 2010 Less than Less than High High School, 13 School, 1 College College % 6% Graduate, Graduate, 37% 35% High High School School Graduate, Graduate, 20% 19% Some Some College, 2 College, 3 8% 2%Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2010 © E3 Alliance, 2012
    11. 11. CENTRAL TEXAS ECONOMY
    12. 12. Unemployment Rate 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 2001 Jun 2001 Sep 2001 Dec 2002 Mar 2002 Jun 2002 Sep 2002 Dec 2003 Mar 2003 Jun 2003 Sep 2003 Dec 2004 Mar 2004 Jun 2004 Sep CTX Unemp. Rate 2004 Dec 2005 Mar 2005 Jun 2005 Sep 2005 Dec 2006 Mar 2006 JunSource: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Texas Ahead website, 2011 2006 Sep 2006 Dec TX Unemp. Rate 2007 Mar 2007 Jun 2007 Sep 2007 Dec 2008 Mar 2008 Jun 2008 Sep 2008 Dec 2009 Mar US Unemp. Rate 2009 Jun 2009 Sep Compared to Texas and the US 2009 Dec 2010 Mar 2010 Jun 2010 Sep Central Texas Unemployment Rate Compared to Texas and the US, 2001-2011 2010 Dec 2011 Mar Central Texas Fairs Well in Unemployment 2011 Jun© E3 Alliance, 2012
    13. 13. Unemployment Rates Decline with Educational Attainment 16 US Unemployment Rate by Educational Attainment 14 12 Unemployment Rate 10 8 6 4 2 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Less than High School Degree High School Degree Some College or Associates Degree Bachelors Degree or higherSource: U.S. Department of Labor © E3 Alliance, 2012
    14. 14. Texas Below the National Average for Unemployment at All Levels of Education 16% Unemployment Rate for Persons Age 25 and Older, 2010 14% 14.9% Unemployment Rate 12% 10% 10.6% 10.3% 9.1% 8% 8.4% 7.4% 6% 4% 4.7% 4.1% 2% 0% Less than High High School Some College or Bachelors degree School graduate graduate Associates degree or higher US TexasSource: US Department of Labor and Census Bureau © E3 Alliance, 2012
    15. 15. CENTRAL TEXASWORKFORCE
    16. 16. Job Growth is Highest in the Professional, Business & Other Services Industry1st Quarter 2010-11 Employment Growth by Industry, 10% 7.8% Percentage Change 8% in Employment 6% 5.1% 5.0% 4.8% 4.3% 4% 3.3% 2.6% 2% 0.3% 0.0% 0% -2% -1.2% -1.6%Source: Texas Workforce Commission, Country Narrative Profile, February 2012 © E3 Alliance, 2012
    17. 17. More Jobs Are Found In the Education & Health Services Industry Percentage Employed by Industry, 2011 1st Quarter Information, 3% Natural Resources & Mining, 1% Other Services, 4% Construction, 5% Financial Activities Group, 6% Education & Health Svcs., 23% Manufacturing, 6% Public Administration, 7% Trade, Transport. & Utilities, 19% Leisure & Hospitality Group, 11% Prof., Business & Other Svcs., 15%Source: Texas Workforce Commission, Country Narrative Profile, February 2012 © E3 Alliance, 2012
    18. 18. The Majority of Employed Workers are in Low-Wage Occupations Austin-Round Rock Employment Statistics by Occupation Group, 2010 160,000 $120,000 140,000 Number Employed $100,000 120,000 Average Wage $80,000 100,000 80,000 $60,000 60,000 $40,000 40,000 $20,000 20,000 - $- Occupational GroupSource: Texas Workforce Commission © E3 Alliance, 2012
    19. 19. Job Growth Will Occur in the Medical, Energy & Computer Fields Statewide Projected Job Growth, by Cluster, 2008-2018 Biotechnology and Life Sciences Energy Information and Computer Aerospace and Defense Petroleum and Chemical ProductsAdvanced Technologies and Manufacturing 0% 5% 10% 15% 20%Source: Texas Workforce Commission © E3 Alliance, 2012
    20. 20. Top 43 Targeted Occupations Texas • Projected employment demands through 2018 rely on bachelor degree attainment and STEM education. Educational Number of Typical Salary STEM Requirements Targeted Range Occupation Occupations Work Experience in a 3 $32,000 - $57,000 1 Related Occupation On-The-Job Training 6 $33,000 - $67,000 0 Associates Degree or 6 $40,000 - $64,000 3 Vocational Certificate Bachelor Degree 28 $48,000 - $94,000 16 or HigherSource: Texas Workforce Commission © E3 Alliance, 2012
    21. 21. The Fastest Growing Careers Requiring 2-Year Degrees are in the Medical FieldsSource: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Every Chance Every Texas website, 2011 © E3 Alliance, 2012
    22. 22. Top 10 Manufactures for Central Texas Vrc IndustriesSource: Texas Workforce Commission, County Narrative Profile, February 2012 © E3 Alliance, 2012
    23. 23. The conclusions of this research do not necessarily reflect the opinions or official position of the Texas Education Agency, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, or the State of Texas. www.e3alliance.org/moreinfo

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