1A Decision/Action Model for Soccer – Pt 10The strategic game of interaction and isolation[JRBoyd briefings-abridged for s...
2“Very nice but, where do we begin?”[e) slide 13]Human Nature [e) slide 14]Goal Survive, survive on own terms, or improve...
3“Why should we use these?” [e) slide 35]Physical represents the world of matter-energy-information all of us are a part ...
4“Upon folding these ideas into ourinteractions/isolation theme we can say:”[e) slide 36]Physical isolation occurs when w...
5“Which leads to” [c) slide 134]StrategyPenetrate adversary’s moral-mental-physical being to dissolve his moral fiber,diso...
6“While in opposite fashion we can say:”[e) slide 37]Physical interaction occurs when we freely exchange energy-matter-in...
7“Insight” [f) slide 11]“Interactions, as shown, represent a many-sided implicitcross-referencing process of projection, e...
8“Which carries us to the question?”[e) slide 46]“How do we fold adversaries back inside themselves, morally-mentally-phys...
9“Illumination”[e) slide 47]“Physically we can isolate adversaries by severing their communications withthe outside world ...
10“Expected payoff”[e) slide 48]“Disintegration and collapse, unless adversaries change their behavior patterns toconform ...
11“Illumination (continued)” [e) slide 49]“Physically we interact by opening-up and maintaining many channels ofcommunicat...
12“Expected payoff” [e) slide 50]“Vitality and growth, with the opportunity to shape and adapt to unfoldingevents thereby ...
13“Pulling all of this together we have in a nutshell” [e) slide 51]“The art of success Shape or influence the moral-ment...
14“Raises question?” [f) slide 17]“How do we set-up and take advantage of the many-sided implicitcross-referencing process...
15“Message” [f) slide 18]“Expose individuals, with different skills and abilities, against a variety ofsituations—whereby ...
16“New conception” [c) slide 7]Action Exploit operations and weapons [physical-mental-moral options] that: Generate a ra...
17“Simply stated” [e) slide 29]“As human beings, we cannot exist without an external or surroundingenvironment from which ...
18“Such a simple statement reveals that:” [e) slide 30]“The theme associated with D & C, P O C, C & C is one of interactio...
19SummaryThe physical-mental-moral factors model is well known in areas of conflict. Sinceit is based from a human perspec...
20SummaryJR Boyd on the need for multiple modelsJohn Boyd on doctrine: “That’s the kind of stuff you gotta do. You got to...
21SummaryAn example of a physical-mental-moral model in action. U.S. Marines – Recruit Depot – San Diego – Confidence Cou...
22SummaryReminder; this model works in an age/context appropriate fashion. If thechildren’s ambition is simply fun for fun...
23Summary – a la Boyd“Key Statements” [g) slide 1]“Without our genetic heritage, cultural traditions, and previous experie...
24Summary – a la Boyd“The OODA “Loop” Sketch” [g) slide 3]“Insights:Note how orientation shapes observation, shapes decisi...
25Selected referencesBoyd briefings and slide showsa) BOYD, J. 1987, Abstract, A Discourse on Winning and Losing(http://po...
26Selected references9. CARR, C. 2000, The Book of War, Sun-Tzu, The Art of Warfare & Karl von Clausewitz, On War (New Yor...
27Selected references26. KORMELINK, H. & SEEVERENS, T. 1997, Developing Soccer Players, The Dutch Way (Leeuwarden, Netherl...
28Selected references44. THORPE, R. BUNKER, D. ALMOND, L. 1986, Rethinking Games Teaching, (Loughborough University:www.tg...
29Selected references58. WEIN, H. 2004, Developing Game Intelligence in Soccer (Spring City, Pa: Reedswain).59. WENGER, E....
30Thank You“I’ll live or die by my own ideas.” Johan CruyffPresentation created June, 2013 by Larry Paul, Peoria Arizona.A...
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Strategic game of interaction and isolation, A Decision/Action model for Soccer- Pt.10

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A Decision/Action Model for Soccer – Pt 10. The strategic game of interaction and isolation - [JRBoyd briefings-abridged for soccer].

“A game in which we must be able to diminish adversary’s ability to communicate or interact with his environment while sustaining or improving ours.”

“How do we do this this? Three ways come to mind; physical, mental and moral."

“According to Von Clausewitz… any conflict calls into play physical, mental, and moral factors. The problem then consists in maintaining reflection or theory at the center of these three tendencies as if suspended among three attracting forces or magnets.” Grehaigne, Richard & Griffin - Teaching and Learning Team Sports and Games.

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  1. 1. 1A Decision/Action Model for Soccer – Pt 10The strategic game of interaction and isolation[JRBoyd briefings-abridged for soccer]“How do we do this this? Three ways come to mind; physical, mentaland moral.” [e) slide 34]“According to Von Clausewitz… any conflict calls into play physical,mental, and moral factors. The problem then consists in maintainingreflection or theory at the center of these three tendencies as ifsuspended among three attracting forces or magnets.” Grehaigne [20]“A game in which we must be able to diminish adversary’s ability tocommunicate or interact with his environment while sustaining orimproving ours.” [e) slide 33]
  2. 2. 2“Very nice but, where do we begin?”[e) slide 13]Human Nature [e) slide 14]Goal Survive, survive on own terms, or improve our capacity for independent action. Diminish adversary’s capacity for independent action, or deny him the opportunityto survive on his on terms, or make it impossible for him to survive at all.Raises the question? [e) slide 15] In a most fundamental way how do we realize this goal or make it more difficultfor others to realize this goal?Implication [c) slide 10] Life is conflict, survival, and conquest.The competition for limited resources tosatisfy these desires may force one to:
  3. 3. 3“Why should we use these?” [e) slide 35]Physical represents the world of matter-energy-information all of us are a part of, live in,and feed upon. [e) slide 35] [In soccer, technical skills are a part of the physical factors. Coaching soccer;“Conditioning is soccer training, soccer training is conditioning.” [48]]Mental represents the emotional/intellectual activity we generate to adjust to, or copewith, that physical world. [e) slide 35] [In soccer the primary mental factor is the ability to quickly read situations anddecide on a course of action. Johan Cruyff; “The only special thing I have isinsight: I see things a fraction earlier…” [5]]Moral represents the cultural codes of conduct or standards of behavior that constrain,as well as sustain and focus, our emotional/intellectual responses. [e) slide 35] [In soccer the moral factor is the level and adaptability of individual and collectivecharacter. Rinus Michels; “This is the guideline for the youth education system,the style of play, and the code of conduct, and needs to be monitored throughthe years.” [37]]
  4. 4. 4“Upon folding these ideas into ourinteractions/isolation theme we can say:”[e) slide 36]Physical isolation occurs when we fail to gain support in the form of matter-energy-informationfrom others outside ourselves. [e) slide 36] [In soccer physical isolation involves degrading or eliminating the available physical,technical and informational options. Simply put, being outplayed on the pitch.]Mental isolation occurs when we fail to discern, perceive, or make sense out of what’s goingaround ourselves. [e) slide 36] [In soccer mental isolation involves misleading, degrading or derailing the decision-making process. Simply put, being outplayed between the ears.]Moral isolation Occurs when we fail to abide by codes of conduct or standards of behavior in amanner deemed acceptable or essential by others outside ourselves. [e) slide 36] [In soccer moral isolation involves degrading or eliminating esprit de corps, trust andcommitment to the mission. Simply put, being outplayed through desire, team spiritand positive team interactions.]
  5. 5. 5“Which leads to” [c) slide 134]StrategyPenetrate adversary’s moral-mental-physical being to dissolve his moral fiber,disorient his mental images, disrupt his operations, and overload his systemas well as subvert, shatter, seize, or otherwise subdue those moral-mentalphysical bastions, connections, or activities that he depends upon—in order todestroy internal harmony, produce paralysis, and collapse adversary’s will toresist. [c) slide 134] [In soccer the destructive focus must be multi-leveled. However, since soccer is acontest of opposing wills moral isolation is a primary goal. This can be done by outworking/playing the opponents, the physical side i.e. the Berti Vogts method; outthinking them, the mental side i.e. Cruyff’s way; having greater moral resolve i.e.Ferguson; or a combination i.e. Michels and “Total Football.”]
  6. 6. 6“While in opposite fashion we can say:”[e) slide 37]Physical interaction occurs when we freely exchange energy-matter-information with othersoutside ourselves. [e) slide 37] [All energy-matter-information is focused on schwerpunkt. Schwerpunkt shapesevery physical interaction while every physical interaction shapes future conditionsand situations of the unfolding schwerpunkt. See Pt.2 Teambuilding]Mental interaction occurs when we generate images or impressions that match-up with theevents or happenings that unfold around ourselves. [e) slide 37] [This involves a common vocabulary, mutual trust, shared and distributedorientations between players. Implicit and explicit interactions must stand up to realenvironmental challenges.]Moral interaction occurs when we live by the codes of conduct or standards of behavior thatwe profess, and others expect us, to uphold. [e) slide 37] [Sticking to your part of the bargain while others do the same.]
  7. 7. 7“Insight” [f) slide 11]“Interactions, as shown, represent a many-sided implicitcross-referencing process of projection, empathy, correlation, andrejection.” [f) slide 11]“Message” [f) slide 15]“Referring back to our previous discussion, we can say: orientation is aninteractive process of many-sided implicit cross-referencingprojections, empathies, correlations, and rejections that is shaped byand shapes the interplay of genetic heritage, cultural tradition, previousexperiences, and unfolding circumstances.” [f) slide 15] [The combination of genetic heritage, cultural tradition and previous experienceagainst a background of unfolding circumstances creates complex system interactions.This requires the attentive, open system perspective as opposed to assertive, closedsystem point of view. By seeing interactions as “a many-sided implicit cross-referencing process of projection, empathy, correlation, and rejection” we have aprocess model that results in high speed, negative feedback loops. A path to survivaland growth.]
  8. 8. 8“Which carries us to the question?”[e) slide 46]“How do we fold adversaries back inside themselves, morally-mentally-physically… without suffering the same fate ourselves?or put another wayHow do we physically isolate our adversaries yet interact with others outsideourselves?How do we mentally isolate our adversaries yet keep in touch henceinteract, with unfolding events.How do we morally isolate our adversaries yet maintain the trust/confidenceof others and thereby interact with them?” [e) slide 46] [See A Decision/Action Model for Soccer – Pt 7, Feedback in soccer, A cyberneticapproach in this series. Any single path, run out to its logical conclusion leads to adead end. We continually deal with all three factors at all times. Separation into neatand clean categories isn’t going to happen.]
  9. 9. 9“Illumination”[e) slide 47]“Physically we can isolate adversaries by severing their communications withthe outside world as well as by severing their internal communications to oneanother… To cut them off from one another we should penetrate their systemby being unpredictable, otherwise they can counter our efforts.Mentally we can isolate our adversaries by presenting them with ambiguous,deceptive, or novel situations, as well as by operating at a tempo or rhythmthey can neither make out nor keep up with. Operating inside their O-O-D-Aloops will accomplish this just by disorienting or twisting their mental images sothey can neither appreciate nor cope with what’s really going on.Morally adversaries isolate themselves when they visibly improve their wellbeing to the detriment of others… by violating codes of conduct or behaviorpatterns that they profess to uphold or others expect them to uphold.” [e) slide 47] [You can recognize moral failure when players hide, quit, cheat or place blame onothers. This behavior in a team is like a cancer. It can quickly infect others anddevelop into “many non-cooperative centers of gravity” i.e. every man for himself. [c]Cohesion breaks down and the mission gets lost in uncoordinated individual actions.]
  10. 10. 10“Expected payoff”[e) slide 48]“Disintegration and collapse, unless adversaries change their behavior patterns toconform to what is deemed acceptable by others outside themselves.” [e) slide 48] [Change, which requires leadership, is necessary and difficult to do under pressure. It’srisky and requires moral courage, sufficient physical capacity and the mental where-with-all to make the most of what’s on hand.]
  11. 11. 11“Illumination (continued)” [e) slide 49]“Physically we interact by opening-up and maintaining many channels ofcommunication with the outside world, hence with others out there, that wedepend upon for sustenance, nourishment, or support. [e) slide 49] [See A Decision/Action Model for Soccer – Pt 5, Adaptive Leadership, OrganicCommand & Control and Distributed Situational Awareness in soccer in this series.]Mentally we interact by selecting information from a variety of sources orchannels in order to generate mental images or impressions that match-up withthe world of events or happenings that we are trying to understand and copewith. [e) slide 49] [See A Decision/Action Model for Soccer – Pt 4, Using heuristics as coaching pointsand Pt 8, Individual decision making in this series.]Morally we interact with others by avoiding mismatches between what we saywe are, what we are, and the world we have to deal with, as well as by abidingby those cultural codes or standards that we are expected to uphold.” [e) slide 49] [See A Decision/Action Model for Soccer – Pt 2, Teambuilding, Necessary elements forteam cohesive action in this series.]
  12. 12. 12“Expected payoff” [e) slide 50]“Vitality and growth, with the opportunity to shape and adapt to unfoldingevents thereby influence the ideas and actions of others.” [Interactions are “an interactive process of many-sided implicit cross-referencingprojections, empathies, correlations, and rejections.” They are simultaneouslyincoming and outgoing, friendly and hostile, clear and ambiguous, critical andtrivial messages received and transmitted over visual, auditory and tactilechannels that contain various degrees and levels of background noise. Whoeverorients quickest and begins to act becomes the leader of the moment. Theiraction will have shaped events into a new direction. Others will follow thistemporary leader pushing events even further from the status quo. Players andcoaches with good fingerspitzengefühl have an advantage. Their experiencehelps them to predict who is likely to influence the tempo and direction ofevents. They can either join in a collaborative effort, continuing to follow thecourse of events, or take preemptive action and assume leadership and apossible change in direction.]
  13. 13. 13“Pulling all of this together we have in a nutshell” [e) slide 51]“The art of success Shape or influence the moral-mental-physical atmosphere that we are a partof, live in, and feed upon so that we not only magnify our inner spirit andstrength, but also influence potential adversaries and current adversaries…yet be able toMorally-mentally-physically isolate our adversaries from their allies and outsidesupport as well as isolate them from one another, in order to: magnify theirinternal friction, produce paralysis, bring about their collapse; and/or bring abouta change… so that they can no longer inhibit our vitality and growth.” [e) slide 51]
  14. 14. 14“Raises question?” [f) slide 17]“How do we set-up and take advantage of the many-sided implicitcross-referencing process of projection, empathy, and correlation,rejection that make appropriate orientation possible?” [f) slide 17] [Striking the balance between teaching, learning, education andindoctrination in the context of soccer. Rinus Michels; “it is important toemploy the teambuilding process as young as possible, even with theyoungest age group category. Team building is a step-by-step educationalmechanism. It occurs in the young age groups with many simple guidelinessuch as looking for open space, trying to win the ball back as soon as it islost and making the field as big as possible.” [37] Note the reference to theteambuilding process at the youngest ages. This calls into question a rigiduse of Piaget’s Stages of Development model. The “simple guidelines” arecoaching heuristics found in Part 4.]
  15. 15. 15“Message” [f) slide 18]“Expose individuals, with different skills and abilities, against a variety ofsituations—whereby each individual can observe and orient himselfsimultaneously to the others and to the variety of changing situations.WhyIn such an environment, a harmony, or focus and direction, in operations iscreated by the bonds of implicit communications and trust that evolve as aconsequence of the similar mental images or impressions each individualcreates and commits to memory by repeatedly sharing the same variety ofexperiences in the same ways.Beneficial payoffA command and control system, whose secret lies in what’s unstated or notcommunicated to one another (in an explicit sense)—in order to exploit lower-level initiative yet realize higher-level intent, thereby diminish friction andcompress time, hence gain both quickness and security.” [f) slide 18]
  16. 16. 16“New conception” [c) slide 7]Action Exploit operations and weapons [physical-mental-moral options] that: Generate a rapidly changing environment (quick/clear observations, orientationand decisions, fast-tempo, fast transient maneuvers, quick kill) Inhibit an adversary’s capacity to adapt to such an environment (cloud or distorthis observations, orientation, and decisions and impede his actions)Idea Simultaneously compress own time and stretch-out adversary time togenerate a favorable mismatch in time/ability to shape and adapt tochange.Goal Collapse adversary’s system into confusion and disorder causing him toover and under react to activity that appears simultaneously menacing aswell as ambiguous, chaotic, or misleading. [c) slide 7]
  17. 17. 17“Simply stated” [e) slide 29]“As human beings, we cannot exist without an external or surroundingenvironment from which we can draw sustenance, nourishment, orsupport.In other wordsInteraction permits vitality and growth while isolation leads to decay anddisintegration.” [e) slide 29] [“Soccer players” do not exist outside of soccer or a soccer like activity. An elevenyear old boy wearing a Man U shirt at school is a student, not a center back. Ifhe’s jogging around a field he’s an athlete, a jogger. Likewise a “soccer coach”doesn’t exist outside the activity of coaching. Their level of interaction (qualityand quantity) within an activity constrains or enables the level of growth;sustained isolation leads to “decay and disintegration.” This is an example ofperipheral participation, a fundamental part of learning models, Part 9. At thesame time the identity of “soccer player/coach” is open to the positive andnegative influences of other domains. Being aware and taking advantage of theseother domains is a key to aiding positive growth and development. They open thedoor to cross-training specific problems for individuals and strengthening theiridentity.]
  18. 18. 18“Such a simple statement reveals that:” [e) slide 30]“The theme associated with D & C, P O C, C & C is one of interaction and isolation ‘Organic Design for Command and Control’ (C&C) emphasizes interaction. ‘Patterns of Conflict’ (POC) emphasize isolation. ‘Destruction and Creation’ (D&C) is balanced between interaction and isolation.”[e) slide 30][Some basic implications throughout these documents are: 1) run every idea out to it’s logical conclusion. This helps to frame its limits and avoid gettingcaught in a dead end or a positive feedback loop. The only difference between being in agroove and stuck in a rut is time. 2) always consider and value the opposing point of view. Every thing has some value. Adetail of an opposing idea maybe the one that can turn your bad idea into a good one. Don’tthrow the baby out with the bath water. 3) do it faster than the opponent. They’re doing the same thing. First one who acts wins. “Agood plan violently executed now is better then a great plan executed next week” GeorgePatton. 4) as important as minding your own process is, you’ll also need to disrupt or destroy youropponents. Getting him to work slower is just as effective as trying to out race him. Bottomline, the strategic game involves competing wills for limited resources. The game is played byhumans in the real world.]
  19. 19. 19SummaryThe physical-mental-moral factors model is well known in areas of conflict. Sinceit is based from a human perspective his it helps to account for Clauswitzianfriction, the difference between theory and practice. Soccer is not immune tothe implications and can benefit from its application.Adopting the physical-mental-moral model as a part of your perspective helpsyou to step beyond assertive teaching and fully utilize the learning models. Itkeeps people first in the people-ideas-technology hierarchy.Why is adopting different models important? At least two reasons. First, there isno single model currently available for anything beyond short term problems. Atsome level, point or time, they’re all wrong. Second the future is uncertain andas you go up each level it approaches at an increasingly faster speed. Unseenminor events can have a tremendous effect that your current model can’thandle. Bateson’s “difference that makes a difference” gets smaller and smaller.
  20. 20. 20SummaryJR Boyd on the need for multiple modelsJohn Boyd on doctrine: “That’s the kind of stuff you gotta do. You got to challenge all assumptions. It’s like,you know, we have doctrine. The Air Force has a doctrine, the Armys got a doctrine,Navy’s got a doctrine, everybody’s got a doctrine. You read my work, doctrine doesn’tappear in there even once. You can’t find it. You know why I don’t have it in there?Because it’s doctrine on day one, every day after it becomes dogma, that’s why.And so what I tell people, I understand that you’re gonna have to write doctrine…even after you write it assume it’s not right. And then not only that look at a wholebunch of other doctrines; German doctrine, other kind of doctrines, learn those too.And then you got a bunch of doctrines. The reason why you want to learn them all,then your not captured by any one. Now you can list stuff out of here, stuff out ofthere, stuff out of there… and you can do better then anybody else.Cause if you got one doctrine you’re a dinosaur, period.” Link to video; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heWpHSOMAmY .
  21. 21. 21SummaryAn example of a physical-mental-moral model in action. U.S. Marines – Recruit Depot – San Diego – Confidence Course. [Building upresistance to isolation, one half of the strategic game.]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbIbzN3cbKM United States Marine Corps Drill Instructor Creed: "These recruits are entrusted to my care. I will train them to the best ofmy ability. I will develop them into smartly disciplined, physically fit,basically trained marines, thoroughly indoctrinated in love of the Corpsand country. I will demand of them and demonstrate by my ownexample, the highest standards of personal conduct, morality andprofessional skill." [36] [Legitimate peripheral participation in a learningcommunity. The apprenticeship model for an extreme environment, war.] Asymmetric Warfare Adaptive Leader Program. [Building up interaction skills, theother half of the strategic game.] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFKb_AjGBB0 “With standards based training after the soldiers do the same scenario over, and over andover again, basically, the soldiers at a certain point they stop learning and they simplyperform to the standards that they believe their key leaders want to see them accomplish.Where in scenario based training you are basically preparing the soldier, or the team forthe unknown by changing variables, changing stressors… no one’s going to react to thesame scenario.” [In short, people handle these scenario’s in different ways. Having insightinto what makes them tic, or tic’s them off is vital for survival and growth.]
  22. 22. 22SummaryReminder; this model works in an age/context appropriate fashion. If thechildren’s ambition is simply fun for funs sake the model can and should reflectthat. Learning still takes place. However, those who want more should expect,and be asked to give more physically, mentally and morally. For them,expectations and standards are higher. Rinus Michels; “This places higher demands on the mentality of the players duringtraining sessions. High demands are also placed on the coach in relation to hispractical and theoretical knowledge and his personality qualities. This concernsall… coaches. Because the coach is responsible for the team’s performance hewill demand even more discipline than before, both during and outside thetraining sessions. These are essential prerequisites to increase the abovementioned soccer tools, including an iron match mentality. In such a climate thetalented player has to ripen, step by step. In our welfare state such a rock hardmental burden is not easy to deal with.” [37]
  23. 23. 23Summary – a la Boyd“Key Statements” [g) slide 1]“Without our genetic heritage, cultural traditions, and previous experiences, we do notpossess an implicit repertoire of psychophysical skills shaped by environments and changesthat have been previously experienced.Without analyses and synthesis across a variety of domains or across a variety ofcompeting/independent channels of information, we cannot evolve new repertoires to dealwith unfamiliar phenomena or unforeseen change.Without a many-sided, implicit cross-referencing process of projection, empathy,correlation, and rejection (across these many different domains or channels of information),we cannot even do analysis and synthesis.Without OODA loops, we can neither sense, hence observe, thereby collect a variety ofinformation for the above processes, nor decide as well as implement actions in accord withthese processes.Or put another way:Without OODA loops embracing all of the above and without the ability to get inside otherOODA loops (or other environments), we will find it impossible to comprehend, shape,adapt to and in turn be shaped by an unfolding evolving reality that is uncertain, everchanging, and unpredictable.” [g) slide 1]
  24. 24. 24Summary – a la Boyd“The OODA “Loop” Sketch” [g) slide 3]“Insights:Note how orientation shapes observation, shapes decision, shapes action, and in turn isshaped by the feedback and other phenomena coming into our sensing or observingwindow.Also note how the entire “loop” (not just orientation) is an ongoing many-sided implicitcross-referencing process of projection, empathy, correlation, and rejection.” [g) slide 3]
  25. 25. 25Selected referencesBoyd briefings and slide showsa) BOYD, J. 1987, Abstract, A Discourse on Winning and Losing(http://pogoarchives.org/m/dni/john_boyd_compendium/abstract-19870000.pdf).b) BOYD, J. 1976, Destruction and Creation(http://pogoarchives.org/m/dni/john_boyd_compendium/destruction_and_creation.pdf)c) BOYD, J. 2007, Patterns of Conflict (http://www.dnipogo.org/boyd/patterns_ppt.pdf)d) BOYD, J. Source Lists for Patterns of Conflict(http://pogoarchives.org/m/dni/john_boyd_compendium/Patterns_of_Conflict_Sources.pdf)e) BOYD, J. 2006, The Strategic Game of ? and ? (http://www.dnipogo.org/boyd/strategic_game.pdf)f) BOYD, J. 2005, Organic Design for Command and Control (http://www.dnipogo.org/boyd/organic_design.pdf).g) BOYD, J. 2010, The Essence of Winning and Losing(http://pogoarchives.org/m/dni/john_boyd_compendium/essence_of_winning_losing.pdf).Books and articles1. ARTMAN, H. GARBIS, C. 1998, Situation Awareness as Distributed Cognition (Proceedings of ECCE’98, Limerick).2. ARTMAN, H. 1999, Co-operation Within and Between Hierarchial Units in Dynamic Decision Making (Ergonomics, Vol.42, No. 11, 1404-14-17).3. ARTMAN, H. 2000, Team Situation Assessment and Information Distribution (Ergonomics, Vol. 43, No. 8, 1111-1128).4. BAARS, B. FRANKLIN, S. 2007, An architectural model of conscious brain functions: Global Workspace Theory and IDA(Elsevier, Neural Networks 20, 955-961).5. BAREND, F. & VAN DORP, H. 1999, Ajax, Barcelona, Cruyff, The ABC of an Obstinate Maestro (London: Bloomsbury).6. BERTALANFFY, L. 1969, General System Theory, Foundations, Development, Applications (New York: George Braziller,Inc).7. BONGAARDT, R. 1996, Shifting Focus, The Bernstein Tradition in Movement Science (Amsterdam: Druk 80).8. BREHMER, B. 2009, The Dynamic OODA Loop: Amalgamating Boyds OODA Loop and the Cybernetic Approach toCommand and Control (Department of War Sciences, Swedish National Defense College, 1-14).
  26. 26. 26Selected references9. CARR, C. 2000, The Book of War, Sun-Tzu, The Art of Warfare & Karl von Clausewitz, On War (New York: TheModern Library).10. CARTIER, J. RUDOLPH, J. STEWART, J. 2001, The Nature and Structure of Scientific Models (Working paper,Wisconsin Center for Education Research, School of Education).11. CHOW, J. et al. 2007 The Role of Nonlinear Pedagogy in Physical Education (Review of Educational Research 2007,Vol. 77, No. 3, 251-278).12. CONKLIN, J. 2005, Wicked Problems & Social Complexity (http://cognexus.org/wpf/wickedproblems.pdf).13. CRENSHAW, D. 2008, The Myth of Multitasking, How “Doing it all” Gets Nothing Done (San Francisco: WileyImprint).14. DAVIDS, K., BUTTON, C. & BENNETT, S. 2008, Dynamics of Skill Acquisition, A Constraints-Led Approach(Champaign, Il: Human Kinetics).15. DYSON, B. GRIFFIN, L. HASTIE, P. 2004, Sport Education, Tactical Games, and Cooperative Learning: Theoreticaland Pedagogical Considerations (SIRE/Quest, 2004, 56, 226-240).16. FORD, P. WARD, P. HODGES, N. WILLIAMS, A. 2009, The Role of Deliberate Practice and Play in CareerProgression in Sport: The Early Engagement Hypothesis (High Ability Studies, Vol. 20, No. 1, 65-75).17. FRANKLIN, S. 1997, Artificial Minds (London, England: Bradford Book).18. FRIGG, R. HARTMANN, S. 1999, Scientific Models (The Philosophy of Science, An Encyclopedia, Vol.2 N-Z, 740-749).19. GOFFMAN, E. 1959, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life (New York: Anchor Books).20. GREHAIGNE, J-F. RICHARD, J-F. GRIFFIN, L. 2005, Teaching and Learning, Team Games and Sports (London:Routledge).21. GROSSMAN, D. 2004, On Combat, The Psychology and Physiology of Deadly Conflict in War and in Peace (WarriorScience Publications).22. HAMMOND, G. 2001, The Mind of War, John Boyd and American Security (Washington D.C: Smithsonian InstitionPress).23. HARRISON, W. 2010, Soccer Awareness, Developing the Thinking Player (Spring City, Pa: Reedswain).24. HYBALLA, P. & TE POEL, H. 2011, Dutch Soccer Secrets (Maidenhead, England: Meyer & Meyer Sport).25. HUGHES, C. 1973, Tactics and Teamwork (Yorkshire, England: EP Group).
  27. 27. 27Selected references26. KORMELINK, H. & SEEVERENS, T. 1997, Developing Soccer Players, The Dutch Way (Leeuwarden, Netherlands:Uitgeverij Eisma bv).27. KORMELINK, H. & SEEVERENS, T. 1997, The Coaching Philosophy of Louis van Gaal and the Ajax Coaches(Leeuwarden, Netherlands: Uitgeverij Eisma bv).28. KORMELINK, H. & SEEVERENS, T. 1997, Team Building (Leeuwarden, Netherlands: Uitgeverij Eisma bv).29. LAVE, J. & WENGER, E. 1991, Situated Learning, Legitimate Peripheral Practice (New York: CambridgeUniversity Press).30. MADL, T. BAARS, B. FRANKLIN, S. 2011, The Timing of the Cognitive Cycle (Open Access, Plosone).31. MARINE CORPS, U.S. 1997, MCDP 1, Warfighting (http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/service_pubs/mcdp1.pdf).32. MARINE Corps, U.S. 1997, MCDP 1-1, Strategy (http://navsci.berkeley.edu/ma20/MCDP%20Books/MCDP%201-1,Strategy.pdf).33. MARINE CORPS, U.S. 1997, MCDP 1-3, Tactics34. (http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/doctrine/genesis_and_evolution/source_materials/MCDP-1-3_tactics.pdf).35. MARINE CORPS, U.S. 1996, MCDP 6, Command and Control(http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/service_pubs/mcdp6.pdf).36. MARINEPARENTS, June 2013, Drill Instructor Creed (http://www.recruitparents.com/bootcamp/dicreed.asp.)37. MICHELS, R. 2001, Teambuilding, The Road to Success (Spring City, Pa: Reedswain).38. OSINGA, F. 2007, Science, Strategy and War, The Strategic Theory of John Boyd (New York: Routledge).39. PAGET, M. 2004, The Unity of Mistakes (Philadelphia, Pa: Temple University Press).40. RAO, V. 2011, Tempo, Timing, Tactics and Strategy in Narrative-Driven Decision-Making (Ribbonfarm Inc).41. RICHARDS, C. 2004, Certain to Win, The Strategy of John Boyd, Applied to Business (Xlibris Corporation).42. STANTON, N. et al. 2006, Distributed situation awareness in dynamic systems: theoretical development andapplication of an ergonomics methodology (Ergonomics, Vol.49, Nos. 12-13, 1288-1311).43. SUTTON-SMITH, B. 1997, The Ambiguity of Play (Cambridge, Ma: Harvard University Press).
  28. 28. 28Selected references44. THORPE, R. BUNKER, D. ALMOND, L. 1986, Rethinking Games Teaching, (Loughborough University:www.tgfu.org)45. VANDERGRIFF, D. 2006, Raising the Bar: Creating and Nurturing Adaptability to Deal with the Changing Face ofWar (Washington, D.C., Center for Defense Information Press).46. VANDERGRIFF, D. 2008, Building Adaptive Leaders: The Army can Adapt its Institution (pt.1)(www.smallwarsjournal.com).47. VANDERGRIFF, D. 2010, When do We Teach the Basics? (ndupress.ndu.edu, Issue 58, Third Quarter 69-74)48. VAN LINGEN, B. 1997, Coaching Soccer, The Official Coaching Book of the Dutch Soccer Association (SpringCity, Pa: Reedswain).49. VERHEIJEN, R. 1998, Conditioning for Soccer (Spring City, Pa: Reedswain).50. VICKERS, J. 2007, Perception, Cognition, and Decision Training, The Quiet Eye in Action (Champaign, Il: HumanKinetics).51. WALKER, G. STANTON, N. JENKINS, D. & YOUNG, M. 2010, A Human Factors Approach to Analysing MilitaryCommand and Control (http://www.dodccrp.org/events/11th_ICCRTS/html/papers/022.pdf).52. WASS DE CZEGE, H. 2011, Operational Art: Continually Making Two Kinds of Choices In Harmony WhileLearning and Adapting (Army Magazine, 46-56).53. WEICK, K. 1993, The Collapse of Sensemaking in Organizations: The Mann Gulch Disaster (AdministrativeScience Quarterly, 38, 628-652).54. WEICK, K. SUTCLIFFE, K. 2005, Organizing and the Process of Sensemaking (Organizational Science, Vol. 16,No. 4, 409-421).55. WEICK, K. 2007, The Generative Properties of Richness (Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 50, No. 1, 14-19).56. WEICK, K. SUTCLIFFE, K. 2007, Managing the Unexpected, Resilient Performance in an Age of Uncertainty, (SanFrancisco, Ca: John Wiley & Sons, Inc).57. WEIN, H. 2000, Developing Youth Soccer Players, Coach Better with the Soccer Development Model(Champaign, Il: Human Kinetics).
  29. 29. 29Selected references58. WEIN, H. 2004, Developing Game Intelligence in Soccer (Spring City, Pa: Reedswain).59. WENGER, E. 1998, Communities of Practice, Learning, Meaning, and Identity (New York: Cambridge UniversityPress).60. WINNER, D. 2000, Brilliant Orange, The Neurotic Genius of Dutch Football (London: Bloomsbury).61. WORTHINGTON, E. 1974, Learning and Teaching Soccer Skills (North Hollywood, Ca: Hal Leighton Printing).
  30. 30. 30Thank You“I’ll live or die by my own ideas.” Johan CruyffPresentation created June, 2013 by Larry Paul, Peoria Arizona.All references are available as stated.All content is the responsibility of the author.For further information, questions or to inquire how to arrange a consultation on this topicyou can contact me at larry4v4@hotmail.com, subject line; decision/action model.The content taken from Boyd’s briefings are direct quotes. I included the brief and slidenumber for each. The reorganization is my effort to make his work relevant and accessibleto the soccer community. The quotes by soccer people like Michels and Cruyff fall right inline with Boyd’s work. Same line of thought, different domains.As one of the leading figures in understanding and dealing with conflict his briefs containpriceless information for coaches and players. His work was based in real world problemsand reflects it. It does not reflect the business interests of any logo or brand.John Boyd (military strategist)http://www.ask.com/wiki/John_Boyd_(military_strategist)?o=2800&qsrc=999

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