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2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
2 programming_assessmentreporting
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2 programming_assessmentreporting

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comp prog

comp prog

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  • 1. Programming the course,Assessment and Reporting
  • 2. Programming the Course
  • 3. Introduction Since all students involved in this course are experienced teachers, I’ll not waste any time on the nuts and bolts of programming a course The following slides offer some tips and observations that may be useful
  • 4. Programming the Course Based on my experience most schools have taken a fairly straight forward approach to programming the course Since IPT is a HSC subject, teachers tend to take the view that the most important thing to do is to make sure that all of the course content is covered in class
  • 5. Programming the Course Given the litigious nature of students in recent years, most teachers err on the side of self preservation The content and requirements of the course are given priority over and above techniques for teaching it. This is entirely understandable (a shame … but understandable)
  • 6. Programming the Course Keep in mind that there is also a substantial amount of content to cover, particularly in Year 11 which is only 3 terms and tends to suffer a lot of interruptions As well, there is an emphasis on project work that, depending on how it is done, will decrease the amount of available teaching time
  • 7. Programming the Course Running a computer facility is also a time intensive activity Especially as we are often dealing with ‘hostile’ clients Thinking - “No doubt someone has done something innovative and interesting in terms of programming the course”…
  • 8. Programming Solutions
  • 9. CSTA The simplest and easiest solution is to join the Computing Studies Teachers Association (CSTA) Once a member, you can obtain ready made teaching and learning programs for various IT-based courses There may be an additional cost for obtaining the program Many schools have adopted this approach This buys you a lot of time
  • 10. CSTA The CSTA programme includes:  A timeline  References  A format that includes:  Students learn about  Students learn to  Related outcomes  Some strategies and activities  An assessment schedule  Suggested Projects Everything you would ever need to satisfy the administrative requirements for the course
  • 11. CSTA There are  Preliminary and  HSC programs for both IPT and SDD A worthwhile investment!
  • 12. Make your own program If you don’t like the CSTA offering and if you have the time, you can create you own program The Board of Studies has an IPT support document available for download that provides examples of units of work Sample programs are included with these notes (InfoProTech High and Heinemann) Or you could modify the CSTA program to suit your students’ needs
  • 13. Make your own program Due to the structure of the preliminary syllabus and the content there is really not a lot of scope to vary the sequencing of the topics from that in the syllabus There is a little more choice in the HSC year. However all it really boils down to is the order in which each topic is taught and which Options to do
  • 14. Make your own program In the Stage 5 IST course, which is not externally examined, there is a lot of scope to adopt a thematic approach and choose content from a range of topics A similar approach could be adopted for the IPT HSC course However, you’d have to track the syllabus fairly closely to ensure that all the required content was covered, which is your main concern teaching any HSC subject
  • 15. Notification
  • 16. Course Outlines I imagine that at most schools, a standard practice is the publication of course outlines for senior students (similar to the outline published for students enrolled at a university course) These are usually issued to students at the start of Year 11 and Year 12 along with a copy of the syllabus and an assessment schedule An example of an IPT course outline is included for download with these notes
  • 17. Assessment & Reporting
  • 18. In this section we look at… The structure of the assessment Notification Reporting Record keeping
  • 19. Assessment structure Reference p62 to 66 of the syllabus. While it is true that assessment:  Provides an indication of students learning, and  Is a means of evaluating and improving teaching and learning programs, the main reason we assess students is because the BOS needs an assessment mark for the HSC. This HSC assessment mark is based on the HSC course only
  • 20. Assessment structure It is also worthwhile remembering that assessment can be use as an indicator as to whether a student is applying him/herself with “diligence and sustained effort”. This is particularly important in the Year 11 Preliminary course, as a student can be determined unsatisfactory and prevented from progressing to the HSC course, if appropriate.
  • 21. Assessment Structure A number and variety of different tasks should be set This ensures that the final grade submitted to the BOS gives a true reflection of a student’s overall ability Because final HSC assessment is based on the HSC course only, there are often overlaps in Preliminary and HSC course contents e.g. project work
  • 22. Assessment Structure Examples of tasks include:  Portfolios  Oral presentations  Self and peer evaluations  Pen and paper tests  Practical tests  Projects  Observation  Debates  Probably others…
  • 23. Requirements for internalassessment Page 64 of the syllabus The practices detailed therein are very important and probably well known by most teachers The requirement to give students “adequate written notice” varies between schools Some schools provide written notification at the start of the school year as well as a separate written notification 2 weeks prior to the task date An example of a task notification is available for downloading
  • 24. What does the BOS require forthe HSC ? An assessment mark for each student based on the following weightings  Project Work 20%  Info Systems and Databases 20%  Communication Systems 20%  Option Strands 40%
  • 25. Assessment Task Notification Notification at the start of the school year is usually in the form of a schedule that indicates:  The date and time of the task  The type of task  The weightings allocated to the various components
  • 26. Assessment Task Notification Two weeks before any task is due, written notification is distributed to students detailing:  The date, time and type of task  The outcomes to be examined  Procedure to adopt in case of sickness and misadventure
  • 27. Assessment Task NotificationStudents receive a published set of assessment guidelines which detail rules such as Procedures for ‘misadventure’ e.g. a medical certificate is virtually the only reason for an extension All tasks must be submitted, even late ones (they get zero BUT avoid being recorded as non-attempts which could lead to failure) Penalties for plagiarism
  • 28. Year 11 Assessment The assessment schedule for Year 11 usually consists of: 2 projects (15% and 25%) Half yearly exam (25%)* Yearly exam (35%)* A half yearly exam is optional for Preliminary courses as many faculties don’t consider enough theory to examine has been covered by the early part of term 2 and time is too tight in Year 11 to spend on the exam process
  • 29. Year 12 Assessment 3 projects (60% in total) Half yearly exam (15%) Trial HSC exam (25%) This appears heavy in project work but the projects contain substantial theory components
  • 30. Reporting
  • 31. Reporting and Outcomes As stated in lecture 1, we use outcomes-based reporting for juniors (via the ‘Denbigh’ reporting system) but good old marks and positions for seniors Outcomes based reporting is used by many schools for seniors:  Rather then collect data about each outcome many schools adopt the approach of collecting data for groups of outcomes  The student reports indicate whether a student is performing strongly or weakly at various grouped outcomes
  • 32. Preliminary Reporting - UsingOutcomesThis is how the outcomes in the Year 11 course could be grouped: P1.1, P1.2, P2.1, P2.2 (Info processes and technology theory) P3.1, P4.1 (Social & ethical) P5.1 (Using software) P6.1, P6.2, P7.1, P7.2 (Project Work) See the following example
  • 33. InfoProTech High School IPT Preliminary Half Yearly Report 2012Student: //// IPT Theory Strong Social & Ethical Issues Strong Using Software WeakTony is making good progress in this subject but must spend more time practising the use of software, especially ‘ Janison’ .
  • 34. Reporting Notice, that not all of the outcome statements from the ‘using outcomes’ slide were used in the report example. This is because students have usually not completed any project work by the time the year 11 half yearly reports are due.
  • 35. HSC Reporting - UsingOutcomesThis is how we could group outcomes for the HSC course: H1.1, H1.2, H2.1, H2.2 (Info Processes and Technology theory) H3.1, H3.2, H4.1 (Social & Ethical) H5.1, H5.1, H6.1, H6.1, H7.1, H7.2 (Project Management)
  • 36. Outcomes and assessment The outcome-based reporting process drives a lot of how the assessment would be carried out Because the outcomes are grouped for reports, the assessment tasks are designed to take into account the various groups of outcomese.g. For the year 11 yearly exam  Part A – examines info processes and technology theory  Part B – examines social & ethical issues  etc
  • 37. Record keeping All data on assessment tasks is best recorded in a spreadsheet or a specialised package such as Motorised Markbook (used at HS at faculty and teacher markbook levels) We use the commercial relational database system ‘Denbigh’ (based on FileMaker Pro) for outcome-based reports, student welfare, sport selections, student info, etc
  • 38. end

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