Per.fin.7.03 p ptcidentity theft ppt (fefe)

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  • 1. Mystery of TheStolen IdentityTake Charge of Your Finances Identity Theft
  • 2. 1.3.1.G1Identity Solve the Mystery Theft “Unlucky” Lucy is one of the many victims of identity theft What is identity theft? © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 2 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 3. 1.3.1.G1Identity Theft Identity Theft IDENTITY THEFT occurs when someone wrongfully acquires and uses a consumer’s personal identification, credit, or account information The FTC is a government agency that focuses on consumer protection © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 3 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 4. 1.3.1.G1Identity Identity Theft Theft Statistics Take a guess! According to the Federal According to the U.S.Trade Commission, how many Department of Commerce,identity theft complaints were what percentage of identity theft victims in 2008 were filed in 2008? under the age of 20? 313, 982 identity theft 7% of identity theft victims complaints were under 20 years of age © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 4 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 5. 1.3.1.G1Identity Theft Identity Theft Victims may have to spend time and money trying to fix the problems that are caused by thieves • 10% of identity theft victims during 2005 reported personal expenses of more than $1200 • 11% of victims in 2005 reported that it took 3 or more months to resolve the problems associated with identity theft after they discovered that their information was being misused © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 5 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 6. 1.3.1.G1Identity Personal Theft Information Identity thieves try to obtain personal Personal information from Informationvictims in order to steal their identities. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 6 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 7. 1.3.1.G1Identity Personal Information Theft Search your purses, wallets, and backpacks. What are you carrying with you right now that reveals your personal information? Drivers License Social Security Card Checkbook Insurance CardsCredit and Debit Cards © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 7 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 8. 1.3.1.G1Identity Personal Information Theft What daily activities require an individual to share personal information? • Making purchases with a check, credit or debit card • Applying for a credit card or loan • Online or telephone shopping • Paying bills through the mail or online • Going to the doctor © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 8 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 9. 1.3.1.G1Identity Solve the Mystery Theft Listen carefully and take very accurate notes to help Lucy find the person who stole her identity © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 9 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 10. 1.3.1.G1 Identity Theft How Do They Do It? The inspector has identified 4 suspects in Lucy’s case. How does the inspector believe the suspects stole Lucy’s identity? Mu stard Mrs. W l onel gh L uC o ched throu il cy’s Search hite ed throu a Lucy’s di gh Sear ing m m f e s s o r P l une scarded m outgo a il Pro Mrs. Searched Lucy’s onli ite Peacock banking webs Guessed Lu cy’s PIN n America,b © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 10 Funded by a grant from Take Charge um Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona er
  • 11. 1.3.1.G1 Identity Theft How Do They Do It?• Thieves obtain personal information through a variety of methods: – Stealing - Information is taken from a purse or wallet, personnel records from a workplace, tax information, bank or credit card statements, or pre-approved credit card offers from the mail. – Diverting Mail - Thieves can complete a change of address form and have the victim’s bills and statements mailed to a different location. – “Dumpster Diving” - Personal information is discarded and thieves remove it from the trash. – Skimming - Thieves attach a device to card processors to steal credit and debit card information © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 11 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 12. 1.3.1.G1 Identity Theft How Do They Do It?• Methods continued... – Phishing - Thieves use a form of electronic communication (usually email) to pretend to be a company or depository institution in order to get the victim to give up their personal information. – Pretexting - Thieves use false pretenses to obtain your personal information from financial institutions, telephone companies, and other sources.  – Spyware - Software installed on the victim’s computer, without their knowledge or consent, that monitors internet use, sends pop up ads, re-directs the computer to other sites, and tracks key strokes. – Hacking - Information is stolen by breaking into a computer system. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 12 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 13. 1.3.1.G1Identity What Identity Thieves Theft Do With Information What has the identity thief done with Lucy’s personal information so far? The thief has been using Lucy’s credit card to make their own purchases © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 13 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 14. 1.3.1.G1Identity What Identity Thieves Theft Do With Information What can identity thieves do if they obtain personal information?• Apply for a new driver’s license• Open new bank accounts• Apply for credit cards or store credit accounts• Obtain cash with bank cards• Get a job• Rent an apartment• Take out student loans• File for bankruptcy © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 14 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 15. 1.3.1.G1 PreventingIdentity Theft Identity Theft Many actions can be taken to help minimize the risk of identity theft What could Lucy have done to help prevent her identity from being stolen? • Mail her documents from a secure post office location • Use a PIN number that is not easy to guess • Shred documents that contain personal information • Make sure to log out of any online banking sites • Never give personal information out over the phone or email © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 15 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 16. 1.3.1.G1 Preventing Identity Theft Identity Theft Wallets and Purses•Only carry what is necessary- do NOT carry social security cards,passports, or birth certificates•Do not hang purses from a chair in a public place•Use purses that close securely © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 16 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 17. 1.3.1.G1 Preventing Identity Theft Identity Theft Credit and Debit Cards•Close unwanted accounts in writing and by phone and cut up the card•Memorize the PIN number and do not use easily accessible numbers(date of birth, address, etc.)•Sign back of cards with signature &“Please see ID”•Do not give out account numbers unless making a transaction that isinitiated by the consumer rather than responding to telephone or e-mail solicitations•Check statements regularly for any errors or signs of fraudulent use © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 17 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 18. 1.3.1.G1 Preventing Identity Theft Identity Theft Credit Card Offers•Shred credit card offers and applications. *a cross-cut shredder is safestbecause it is more difficult to reassemble•Cut up or shred pre-approved credit card offers that are not used•“Opt-out” of pre-screened credit offers for five years atwww.optoutprescreen.com © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 18 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 19. 1.3.1.G1 Preventing Identity Theft Identity Theft Mail•Shred all credit card offers, bills, statements, and anything else thatcontains personal information•Deposit outgoing mail in secure post office collection boxes•Contact the post office and request a vacation hold when unable topick up mail•Do not leave mail in an unsecured mailbox overnight or for a longperiod of time © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 19 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 20. 1.3.1.G1 PreventingIdentity Theft Identity Theft Email•Keep your username and password protected•Use a password that is a combination of words, numbers, andsymbols and cannot be easily found (do not use names, birthdays,addresses, etc.)•Verify the source of an email asking for personal information bycalling the company to confirm the email is from them © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 20 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 21. 1.3.1.G1 PreventingIdentity Theft Identity Theft Telephone•Verify the source of any phone call asking for personal informationby calling the company to confirm the phone call is from them andnot a potential identity thief using their name. Use the phone numberlisted on your account statement or in the telephone book. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 21 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 22. 1.3.1.G1 PreventingIdentity Theft Identity Theft Computer Security•Use anti-virus and anti-spyware software and update them regularly•Do not click on links found in pop-up ads•Only download software from trusted websites•Set web browser security to medium-high or high•Keep operating system and web browser software updated•Do not give out any personal information unless making a purchase•Choose security questions with answers only you would know © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 22 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 23. 1.3.1.G1 PreventingIdentity Theft Identity Theft Computer Security- Continued•Watch for clues that might indicate a computer is infected withspyware. such as a stream of pop-up ads, random error messages, andsluggish performance when opening programs or saving files.•If it is suspected that a computer is infected with spyware,immediately stop shopping, banking or doing any other online activitythat involves user names, passwords, or other sensitive information.Then, confirm that the security software is active and current and runit to scan the computer for viruses and spyware, deleting anything theprogram identifies as a problem. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 23 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 24. 1.3.1.G1 PreventingIdentity Theft Identity Theft Social Networks, Blogs, & Chat Rooms•Consider joining only sites that limit access to posts to a definedgroup of users. Make sure you know how the site access works beforejoining. Don’t join sites that allow anyone to view postings.•Never post your full name, Social Security Number, bank or creditcard information, address, or phone number.•Avoiding posting information that could be used to indentify youoffline such as school, work, or other locations where you spend time. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 24 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 25. 1.3.1.G1 Preventing Identity Theft Identity Theft Social Networks, Blogs, & Chat Rooms- Continued•Use privacy settings to restrict who can access personal sites•Remember that once information is posted online, it cannot be takenback. Even if information is deleted, older versions may still exist onother peoples computers and be circulated online•Only post information that you are comfortable with anyone viewing © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 25 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 26. 1.3.1.G1 Preventing Identity Theft Identity Theft Internet Purchases•Look for “https” or a picture of a lock after the URL or in the bottomright hand corner indicating the site is secure “https” s = secure•Do not give any personal information on a site if it is not secure•Enter the website address yourself rather than following a link from anemail or internet advertisement•Use a credit card instead of a debit card when making online purchases © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 26 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 27. 1.3.1.G1 PreventingIdentity Theft Identity Theft Social Security Number•Memorize Social Security number•Keep Social Security card in a safe place (do not carry it in wallet)•Only give a Social Security number when absolutely necessary- askwhy a Social Security number is needed and how the information willbe protected•Do not print a social security number on check blanks © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 27 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 28. 1.3.1.G1 Preventing Identity Theft Identity Theft Credit Reports•Check credit reports with each of the three reporting agencies at leastonce a year•Consumers receive one free credit report from each of the reportingagencies every year, so ordering one credit report from one agency everyfour months will keep consumers up to date and constantly alerted totheir credit report status•Immediately dispute any wrong information © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 28 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 29. 1.3.1.G1 Identity 3 Credit Theft Reporting AgenciesExperian Equifax Trans UnionPO Box 2104 PO Box 105873 PO Box 390Allen, TX 75013-2104 Atlanta, GA 30348 Springfield, PA 19064-0390Report Order: Report Order: Report Order:1-888-397-3742 1-800-685-1111 1-800-888-4213Fraud Hotline: Fraud Hotline: Fraud Hotline:1-888-397-3745 1-800-525-6285 1-800-6807289www.experian.com www.equifax.com www.tuc.com To order a credit report from any of the three reporting agencies, use the following website: www.annualcreditreport.com © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 29 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 30. 1.3.1.G1Identity Preventing Theft Identity Theft Key Guidelines• Protect your Social Security number by only giving it out when absolutely necessary• Keep usernames and passwords safe- use a combination of letters, numbers, and symbols that are not easily identified• Select security check questions with answers only you would know• Dont give out personal information over the phone, through the mail, or on the Internet unless youve initiated the contact and are sure you know who youre dealing with © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 30 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 31. 1.3.1.G1 Identity Preventing Theft Identity Theft Key Guidelines• Check credit reports at least once per year• Shred all documents that contain personal information• Be careful using the Internet. Only give out personal information when making a purchase on a secure website• Search your name occasionally to see if any unusual information appears• Be observant and follow your instincts © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 31 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 32. 1.3.1.G1 RecognizingIdentity Theft Identity Theft How did Lucy find out that her identity had been stolen? Her credit card was denied in a store Could Lucy have recognized the identity theft earlier? If so, how? She could have checked her online banking more often and then she would have recognized the extra charges on her credit card © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 32 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 33. 1.3.1.G1Identity Recognizing Theft Identity Theft Early detection is key! Watch for the following signs• New accounts or charges you • Being denied credit when didn’t make there is no reason to be• Calls from collection • Missing bills or mailed agencies statements• Incorrect information on your credit report © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 33 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 34. 1.3.1.G1Identity What To Do If Theft Identity Theft Happens What steps did Lucy take when she discovered her identity had been stolen? She filed a report with the local police What should have Lucy done when she discovered the identity theft? © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 34 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 35. 1.3.1.G1Identity What To Do If Theft Identity Theft Happens © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 35 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 36. 1.3.1.G1Identity What To Do If Theft Identity Theft Happens © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 36 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 37. 1.3.1.G1Identity Deter, Detect, Defend- Theft Avoid Identity theft Hear stories from real-life identity theft victims on the FTC’s “Deter, Detect, Defend- Avoid Identity Theft” video http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/idtheft/video/avoid-identity-the © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 37 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 38. 1.3.1.G1Identity Personal Theft Liability Since Lucy discovered the theft very quickly, she will only be liable for $50.00 in charges on her credit card!• Credit Cards – Truth in Lending Act limits liability for unauthorized charges to $50.00 per card – A letter must be received by the creditor within 60 days of the first bill containing the error – The dispute must be resolved within 90 days of the creditor receiving the letter © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 38 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 39. 1.3.1.G1Identity Personal Liability Theft• ATM and Debit Cards – The Electronic Funds Transfer Act provides protection – The amount a person is liable for depends upon how quickly the loss is reported • Within two days: maximum $50.00 • Within sixty days: maximum $500.00 • After sixty days a person may be liable for everything © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 39 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 40. 1.3.1.G1Identity Personal Liability Theft• Checks – Contact the financial institution and stop payment – Most states hold the financial institution responsible for losses of a forged check © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 40 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 41. 1.3.1.G1 Identity TheftIdentity Theft Protection• Offered by banks and other companies• Services – Closely monitor accounts and personal information – Alert consumer when there is a change – Help resolve any problems if identity theft does occur © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 41 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 42. 1.3.1.G1 Identity TheftIdentity Theft Protection• Cost – $5.00 to $35.00 per month – Depends on amount of services provided• Can NOT eliminate identity theft but can help prevent it © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 42 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 43. 1.3.1.G1 Identity TheftIdentity Theft Protection What are the pros and cons of identity theft protection? Pros ConsConvenient CostSaves consumer time because Most of the services offered canthey don’t have to monitor be completed by the consumertheir own accounts and credit for no costreports © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 43 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 44. 1.3.1.G1 Identity TheftIdentity Theft Insurance © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 44 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 45. 1.3.1.G1 “Solve the Mystery”Identity Theft Activity• Directions – Divide into 4 groups – Each group will take turns verbally answering a question about identity theft – If the question is answered correctly, the group will receive a clue that will help reveal Lucy’s identity thief – If the question is answered incorrectly, play will move on to the next group and the group that answered incorrectly will not receive a clue – Play will continue until all 12 clues have been won- each group will have at least 3 chances to receive a clue © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 45 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 46. 1.3.1.G1 Identity Theft Who Did It? Who is Lucy’s identity thief? Mu s t a r dail Mrs. W hiteCol o n e l y’s outgoing m Searched Lucy’s di scarded uc y mail in thSe ar ched L conservator e kitchen in the Mrs. Peac m f e s s o r P l une ock Pro onli Guessed Lucy’s PIN Searched Lucy’s brary number in the hall banking w ebsite in the li Make your guess! © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 46 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 47. 1.3.1.G1Identity Solve the Theft Mystery Find out who the true identity thief is! © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised May 2010– Consumer Protection Unit – Identity Theft – Slide 47 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona