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Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning
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Highlights From Future of Education - mSchool + DreamBox Learning

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In the edWeb.net Blended Learning community’s latest webinar, Elliot Sanchez joined Dr. Tim Hudson, Senior Director of Curriculum Design for DreamBox Learning, Inc., and discussed the future of math …

In the edWeb.net Blended Learning community’s latest webinar, Elliot Sanchez joined Dr. Tim Hudson, Senior Director of Curriculum Design for DreamBox Learning, Inc., and discussed the future of math education. Elliot, Founder & CEO of mSchool, and one of the 2014 Forbes 30 Under 30, is a leading education innovator with 14 state-funded classrooms that successfully leverage blended learning. Elliot and Tim discussed mSchool’s approach and successes, blended learning, formative assessment, meeting the diverse needs of all students, Common Core State Standards, and digital learning technologies. They provided a recap of insights from the January 22, 2014 The Future of Math Education: A Panel Discussion of Promising Practices webinar, with a focus on blended learning. That panel included NCSM President Valerie Mills, renowned math educator; author Dr. Cathy Fosnot, and past NCTM and AMTE President Dr. Francis (Skip) Fennell. Everyone interested in the success of all students in learning mathematics—educators, parents, and community members— can appreciate the valuable insights and approach to innovation from these education thought leaders.

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  • Topic 1: This is an opportunity to look at assessment differently: how and what we assess need to be examined. Bottom line assessment needs to be continuous and inform teaching. Leren: teaching and learning cannot be separated.
  • Topic 1: Dynamic versus static assessment: emphasis needs to be on capturing the mathematizing, ie. the structuring, the modeling, the strategies…
  • Topic 1: A framework that is dynamic
  • Effective use of formative assessment strategies depends on well defined goals - So, frame your goals in a way that they not are focused strictly on doing problems, …….you will have a hard time employing formative assessment strategies and capitalizing on potential learning gains. Consider these two examples:
  • Three tools in the toolkit, 1. Tool 1 – is organized with the cross grade trajectories clearly labeled 2. Tool 2 – connects the practices to specific content!
  • Topic 2
  • Transcript

    • 1. making communities into classrooms Elliot Sanchez, CEO & Founder Elliot@mSchools.org
    • 2. a program to bring the best of blended learning to students in communities and schools
    • 3. Elliot Sanchez, CEO  Taught middle school math at Booker T. Washington Alternative Middle  Managed math programs for 700,000 students in Louisiana  Lead Alternative and CTE Portfolio for New Orleans’ Recovery School District  2014 Forbes “30 Under 30”  Teach for America National Social Innovation Award
    • 4. 2 x -4=5
    • 5. Forget MATH
    • 6. Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study
    • 7. Low income = almost Slovakia
    • 8. Goal: Students perform at or above grade level in math by eighth grade Target: 68% of 8th graders earn Basic or above on LEAP by 2012 5,000 Baseline 4,500 HSRP 4,000 MSP 3,500 ENFA 8 TAP 3,000 HPSI 2,500 Ed Pipeline LSSI 2,000 HPHP 1,500 21st CCLC 1,000 CPMS Trailblazers RTI MS 500 0 2009-2010 2010-2011 Current 62% School Year Superintendent’s Delivery Unit | Student-Centered Process Reform 2011-2012 MS JAG Connections pg. 13
    • 9. Goal: Students perform at or above grade level in math by eighth grade Target: 68% of 8th graders earn Basic or above on LEAP by 2012 5,000 Baseline 4,500 HSRP 4,000 MSP 3,500 ENFA 8 TAP 3,000 HPSI 2,500 Ed Pipeline LSSI 2,000 HPHP 1,500 21st CCLC 1,000 CPMS Trailblazers RTI MS 500 0 2009-2010 2010-2011 Current 62% School Year Superintendent’s Delivery Unit | Student-Centered Process Reform 2011-2012 MS JAG Connections pg. 13
    • 10. Goal: Students perform at or above grade level in math by eighth grade Target: 68% of 8th graders earn Basic or above on LEAP by 2012 5,000 Baseline 4,500 HSRP 4,000 MSP 3,500 ENFA 8 TAP 3,000 HPSI 2,500 Ed Pipeline LSSI 2,000 HPHP 1,500 21st CCLC 1,000 CPMS Trailblazers RTI MS 500 0 2009-2010 2010-2011 Current 62% School Year Superintendent’s Delivery Unit | Student-Centered Process Reform 2011-2012 MS JAG Connections pg. 13
    • 11. Q * R = Learning
    • 12. 10 * 1 = 10 Q * R = Learning
    • 13. 10 * 1 = 10 Q * R = Learning 5 * 5 = 25
    • 14. Goal: Students perform at or above grade level in math by eighth grade Target: 68% of 8th graders earn Basic or above on LEAP by 2012 5,000 Baseline 4,500 HSRP 4,000 MSP 3,500 ENFA 8 TAP 3,000 HPSI 2,500 Ed Pipeline LSSI 2,000 HPHP 1,500 21st CCLC 1,000 CPMS Trailblazers RTI MS 500 0 2009-2010 2010-2011 Current 62% School Year Superintendent’s Delivery Unit | Student-Centered Process Reform 2011-2012 MS JAG Connections pg. 13
    • 15. Slow, Complex Setup Grade Level Grouping One Size Fits All
    • 16. Grade Level Grouping One Size Fits All
    • 17. One Size Fits All
    • 18. Pilot Student Results 2012 Mathematics (baseline) 2013 Mathematics (after mSchool) Scale score change mSchool student average 325.5 333.3 7.8 Control group average 315.4 297.2 -18.2 Observed difference 10.1 36.1 26 Supplemental use saw an average of 2.9 years of learning in 1 year Observed difference (Scale Score) 26 Standard Deviation 50 Effect size (OD/SD) Student data 2011/12 and 2012/13 Integrated Louisiana Assessment of Educational Progress 0.52 Years of additional gain (0.52/0.27), Nationally normed1 1.9 mSchool Scale Score Avg. Effect (26.0) State-administered NCLB accountability testing “The iLEAP tests were scaled so as to appear similar (in appearance) with the LEAP and GEE scaled score system, that is with a median of approximately 300 and a standard deviation of approximately 50. The lowest obtainable scaled score (LOSS) is 100, and the highest obtainable scaled score (HOSS) is 500 for all iLEAP test forms.” LA Dept of Ed
    • 19. National Recognition
    • 20. Expansion Student Enrollments 400 200 0 Q1 2013 Q1 2014
    • 21. making communities into classrooms
    • 22. Highlights from the Future of Math Education: A Panel Discussion of Promising Practices
    • 23. Distinguished Panel • Francis 'Skip' Fennell, professor of education, McDaniel College, past NCTM, AMTE president • Cathy Fosnot, professor emeritus of childhood education, City College of New York, Founding Director of Math in the City • Valerie L. Mills, president, National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics; supervisor and mathematics education consultant, Oakland Schools, Michigan Moderator • Tim Hudson, Sr. Director of Curriculum Design, DreamBox Learning
    • 24. Topics • Formative Assessment • Success for All Students with Common Core & Learning Resources • Selecting & Implementing Digital Learning Resources
    • 25. Formative Assessment • How do we ensure it’s not just “another thing” to do? • How do we ensure it's an integral component of learning rather than as another approach to assessment?
    • 26. Jennifer James, Anthropologist “Tapestry is that body of assumptions, beliefs, customs, and practices that we accept as foundational. They define who we are. In this time of great change, the tapestry is being torn rapidly and everywhere, and we begin to fall apart, becoming anxious and losing belief in who we are. We look backward. We become pessimistic about the present and the future because we can’t envision a new tapestry.”
    • 27. Formative Assessment • Needs to foresee where and how one can anticipate that which is just coming into view in the distance (Streefland 1985). • Needs to capture genuine mathematizing: children’s strategies, their ways of modeling realistic problems, and their understanding of key mathematical ideas. (Fosnot and Dolk 2001; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen 1996).
    • 28. The Landscape of Learning
    • 29. Embedded Formative Assessment Three key elements: 1. elicit evidence about learning to close the gap between current and desired performance, 2. adjust the learning experience to close the performance gap with useful feedback, and 3. involve students in the assessment learning process Adapted from Margaret Heritage, 2008
    • 30. Formative Assessment and Productive Goals Goals and lessons need to… • focus on the mathematics concepts and practices (not on doing particular math problems) • be specific enough that you can effectively gather and use information about student thinking • be understood to sit within a trajectory of goals and lessons that span days, weeks, and/or years
    • 31. Complete problems #3 -18 Revise directions to focus students on mathematical goals that describe important concepts as well as skills. Example 1.
    • 32. Look closely at this problem set to identify the solutions that will be positive and those that will be negative without fully simplifying each task. Describe the important features of an expression that help you make this decision. Revise instructional goals and directions to focus students on important mathematical concepts and relationships as well as skills. Example 1.
    • 33. Two-pen assessment 4 x 25 = 16 x 25 = 40 x 25 = 10 x 100 = 27 ÷ 3 = 10 x 13 = 2 x 13 = 12 x 13 = 3 x 9 = 3 x 90 = 12 x 9 = 12 x 12 = 6 x 18 = 6 x 24 =
    • 34. Fennell, Kobett, and Wray, 2013
    • 35. Success for ALL Students In the Common Core era… • How can educators wisely choose and create resources? • What can be learned from past initiatives about standards and resource implementation?
    • 36. Understanding • • • • • • 4.NBT Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers. Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic. 4.NF Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering. Build fractions from unit fractions by applying and extending previous understandings of operations on whole numbers. Understand decimal notation for fractions and compare decimal fractions. 4.MD Geometric measurement: understand concepts of angle and measure angles.
    • 37. Representation 3.NF.2 – Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line diagram. 4.NBT.5 – Multiply a whole number…Illustrate and explain…by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models. 5.MD.4 – Measure volumes by counting unit cubes, using cubic cm, cubic in, cubic ft, and improvised units. 6.RP.3 – Use ratio and rate reasoning…by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double line diagrams or equations.
    • 38. Here’s the Point Conceptual understanding is NOT an option, It’s an expectation. (AND, it’s about time!)
    • 39. CCSS Curriculum Materials Analysis Tools Financial support for this project was provided by • Brookhill Foundation (Kathy Stumpf) • Texas Instruments (through CCSSO) Development team lead by William S. Bush (chair), University of Louisville, KY The toolkit can be downloaded from the NCSM website at: http://www.mathedleadership.org/ccss/materials.html
    • 40. CCSS Curriculum Materials Analysis Tools • • • • • • • Overview User’s Guide Tool 1: Content Analysis Tool 2: Mathematical Practices Analysis Tool 3: Overarching Considerations • Equity • Assessment • Technology Professional Development Facilitator Guide PowerPoint Slides
    • 41. Fosnot • Takes the Standards of Practice seriously • Provides professional development within…teachers learn as they use the materials • Not just a bunch of activities but crafted sequences to support progressive development: learning trajectories (landscapes)
    • 42. Digital Learning • How can technology meet the needs of every child? • How can educators wisely select and implement digital learning resources and technologies? • When does learning benefit from the inclusion of digital instructional resources and when might it undermine learning? • What do teachers and administrators need to learn about effectively facilitating learning using digital learning resources and what will it take for educators to develop this expertise?
    • 43. Student Voice
    • 44. Fullan: Alive in the Swamp “Technology–enabled innovations have a different problem, mainly pedagogy and outcomes. Many of the innovations, particularly those that provide online content and learning materials, use basic pedagogy – most often in the form of introducing concepts by video instruction and following up with a series of progression exercises and tests. Other digital innovations are simply tools that allow teachers to do the same age-old practices but in a digital format.” (p. 25) Fullan & Donnelly, Alive in the Swamp: Assessing Digital Innovations in Education, © July 2013, www.nesta.org/uk
    • 45. @fnoschese
    • 46. How do educators evaluate digital learning resources? Ten Design Considerations 1. Topics are developed with multiple representations (graphs, tables, and equations) and students are asked to use multiple representations in sense making. 2. Students are engaged in constructing mathematical understanding through substantive tasks that maintain a high level of cognitive demand. 3. Mathematical discourse is valued. a. Some tasks require written responses. b. Electronic forums and the like promote interaction between peers and instructor. c. Teacher-student and student-student conversations within the confines of the physical classroom.
    • 47. How do educators evaluate digital learning resources? (Continued) 4. Online tools and resources support the learning environment. (i.e., Online calculators, graphing tools, journals, hotlinks, etc.) 5. Mathematical content is delivered or available in a variety of formats (i.e., Teacher lecture, demonstrations and applets, games, audio, cooperative problem solving, etc.) 6. Mathematical experiences are provided to build conceptual understanding in conjunction with procedural fluency. 7. Online tutors are available, accessible, and mathematically competent. 8. Program takes advantage of technology (animation, color, movement, links). 9. Program offers suggestions to the teacher for monitoring student learning, adjusting instruction, and providing possible interventions. 10. Program offers supplemental activities (online and offline) to the teacher that support students in developing mathematical reasoning.
    • 48. SAMR Model by Dr. Ruben R. Puentedura, www.hippasus.com/rrweblog
    • 49. Q&A
    • 50. DreamBox Combines Three Essential Elements to Accelerate Student Learning
    • 51. DreamBox Lessons & Virtual Manipulatives Intelligently adapt & individualize to: • Students’ own intuitive strategies • Kinds of mistakes • Efficiency of strategy • Scaffolding needed • Response time
    • 52. Robust Reporting
    • 53. Strong Support for Differentiation
    • 54. DreamBox supports small group and whole class instructional resources • • • • Interactive white-board teacher lessons www.dreambox.com/teachertools Tutorials for virtual manipulatives Concept video introductions
    • 55. Free School-wide Trial! www.dreambox.com/freetrial
    • 56. Thank you!

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