The Future of Personalized Learning in Elementary Schools
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The Future of Personalized Learning in Elementary Schools

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Personalized learning is the “Absolute Priority 1” of the new Race to the Top—District competition, and the latest Speak Up National Research Project reports that 74 percent of administrators ...

Personalized learning is the “Absolute Priority 1” of the new Race to the Top—District competition, and the latest Speak Up National Research Project reports that 74 percent of administrators believe that digital content increases student engagement and 50 percent find that it helps to personalize instruction.

Attend this web seminar to learn what the Speak Up National Research Project and Project Tomorrow discovered about what students, teachers, parents and administrators see as the future of personalized learning, how new technologies and digital content are transforming learning in elementary schools, and how these factors affect the decisions administrators need to make today.

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  • You can use this as an intro slide, if you’d like. You can add the relevant information and a photo. To add your photo, click on the photo icon within the box that says “Click to add text. (lower left-hand corner).
  • This is your intro slide. Add the relevant information. To add your photo, click on the photo icon within the box that says Click to add text. (The photo icon is the lower left icon.) If you have trouble adding your photo, we’ll be happy to do it for you prior to the rehearsal.
  • The Steering Committee has spent most of its time and energy in the first two stages so that we know our Strategic Plan is aiming in the right direction for the next five years. The draft Strategic Plan you are receiving expresses our priorities in terms of achievements, and explains the needed assessment evidence that will be collected to determine success. These two steps had to be completed prior to developing the specifics of a detailed Strategic Plan.
  • At dreambox we have designed our program to allow How do we improve learning and teaching through the personalization of strategies, tools, and supports for students?Many of you are familiar with “Formative Assessment”. DreamBox has designed our program around the idea of “Formative Instruction”—every lesson within our program utilizes virtual manipulatives that allow students to show their thinking—through rich, interactive and open ended problem solving lessons—and allows DreamBox to capture every decision a student makes including response time, strategy used, types of mistakes, how they learn and more. Based on this data, about a student and how they learn, DreamBox responds to students with immediate, personalized assistance, adjusts the level of difficulty, scaffolding, sequencing, number of hints, and the pacing of problems based each student’s unique needs—And provides teachers with real-time, actionable data to increase their effectiveness in tailoring instruction.
  • At dreambox we have designed our program to allow How do we improve learning and teaching through the personalization of strategies, tools, and supports for students?Many of you are familiar with “Formative Assessment”. DreamBox has designed our program around the idea of “Formative Instruction”—every lesson within our program utilizes virtual manipulatives that allow students to show their thinking—through rich, interactive and open ended problem solving lessons—and allows DreamBox to capture every decision a student makes including response time, strategy used, types of mistakes, how they learn and more. Based on this data, about a student and how they learn, DreamBox responds to students with immediate, personalized assistance, adjusts the level of difficulty, scaffolding, sequencing, number of hints, and the pacing of problems based each student’s unique needs—And provides teachers with real-time, actionable data to increase their effectiveness in tailoring instruction.
  • At dreambox we have designed our program to allow How do we improve learning and teaching through the personalization of strategies, tools, and supports for students?Many of you are familiar with “Formative Assessment”. DreamBox has designed our program around the idea of “Formative Instruction”—every lesson within our program utilizes virtual manipulatives that allow students to show their thinking—through rich, interactive and open ended problem solving lessons—and allows DreamBox to capture every decision a student makes including response time, strategy used, types of mistakes, how they learn and more. Based on this data, about a student and how they learn, DreamBox responds to students with immediate, personalized assistance, adjusts the level of difficulty, scaffolding, sequencing, number of hints, and the pacing of problems based each student’s unique needs—And provides teachers with real-time, actionable data to increase their effectiveness in tailoring instruction.
  • At dreambox we have designed our program to allow How do we improve learning and teaching through the personalization of strategies, tools, and supports for students?Many of you are familiar with “Formative Assessment”. DreamBox has designed our program around the idea of “Formative Instruction”—every lesson within our program utilizes virtual manipulatives that allow students to show their thinking—through rich, interactive and open ended problem solving lessons—and allows DreamBox to capture every decision a student makes including response time, strategy used, types of mistakes, how they learn and more. Based on this data, about a student and how they learn, DreamBox responds to students with immediate, personalized assistance, adjusts the level of difficulty, scaffolding, sequencing, number of hints, and the pacing of problems based each student’s unique needs—And provides teachers with real-time, actionable data to increase their effectiveness in tailoring instruction.
  • The first key component of effective personalized learning environments is ensuring that real-time data about individual students informs customized instruction.As you all know, data collection is not new.  Technology has long allowed us to collect massive amounts of information to spot patterns in learning and help validate effective teaching approaches.  However, educators are not able to sift through mountains of data in real-time to inform instructional decisions.Today new technology is able to analyze data that gives us an incredibly deep view of exactly what students are thinking—and use that information to instantly inform instructional decisions.Many of you are familiar with “Formative Assessment”. DreamBox has designed our program around the idea of “Formative Instruction”—every lesson within our program utilizes virtual manipulatives that allow students to show their thinking—through rich, interactive and open ended problem solving lessons—and allows DreamBox to capture every decision a student makes including response time, strategy used, types of mistakes, how they learn and more. Based on this data, about a student and how they learn, DreamBox responds to students with immediate, personalized assistance, adjusts the level of difficulty, scaffolding, sequencing, number of hints, and the pacing of problems based each student’s unique needs—And provides teachers with real-time, actionable data to increase their effectiveness in tailoring instruction.
  • The first key component of effective personalized learning environments is ensuring that real-time data about individual students informs customized instruction.As you all know, data collection is not new.  Technology has long allowed us to collect massive amounts of information to spot patterns in learning and help validate effective teaching approaches.  However, educators are not able to sift through mountains of data in real-time to inform instructional decisions.Today new technology is able to analyze data that gives us an incredibly deep view of exactly what students are thinking—and use that information to instantly inform instructional decisions.Many of you are familiar with “Formative Assessment”. DreamBox has designed our program around the idea of “Formative Instruction”—every lesson within our program utilizes virtual manipulatives that allow students to show their thinking—through rich, interactive and open ended problem solving lessons—and allows DreamBox to capture every decision a student makes including response time, strategy used, types of mistakes, how they learn and more. Based on this data, about a student and how they learn, DreamBox responds to students with immediate, personalized assistance, adjusts the level of difficulty, scaffolding, sequencing, number of hints, and the pacing of problems based each student’s unique needs—And provides teachers with real-time, actionable data to increase their effectiveness in tailoring instruction.
  • The third key component of creating a personalized learning environment is ensuring that instruction for each individual student is being optimizes as it is being delivered—that students have intelligent adaptive learning paths that are based on competency-based progression and student-driven learning.As a single student works within DreamBox for one hour, our technology tracks, processes and responds to over 48,000 pieces of information and adjusts the student’s lessons and learning path in real-time.With intelligent, adaptive learning paths struggling students can move backwards, to reinforce instruction as needed and advanced students can move forward…Intelligent Adaptive Learning™ delivers instruction and support that students needs, when they need it. Allowing students to work in an environment where the level of instruction, support, tools available and encouragement and rewards are personalized and responsive to each student’s level of mathematical proficiency. This new class of intelligent adaptive learning technology learns the learner as the learner learns—it is a true game-changer in education. 

The Future of Personalized Learning in Elementary Schools The Future of Personalized Learning in Elementary Schools Presentation Transcript

  • The Future of Personalized Learning in Elementary Schools Results from the Speak Up 2012 National Research Project and Project Tomorrow
  • Julie Evans CEO, Project Tomorrow Chief Researcher, Speak Up National Research Project www.tomorrow.org/speakup Neal Manegold Instructional Design Lead DreamBox Learning Presenters: @NealManegold
  • Speak Up Findings: our discussion • How are elementary students personalizing learning already, both in school and out of school? • What are their parents’ aspirations? • How well are today’s elementary schools meeting the student & parent aspirations? • What is the teacher & principal point of view on personalized learning with new tech tools? • What does personalized learning really mean?
  • • “Personalized learning means to me that I am teaching a child where they are and what they need in order to be successful. It means that I am not just teaching the curriculum, but teaching a child.” • Elementary Teacher (NC) • Response to Speak Up 2012 Question
  • Annual national research project  Online surveys + focus groups  Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education  Institutions receive free report with their own data Collect ideas ↔ Stimulate conversations  K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators  Pre-Service Teachers in Schools of Education Inform policies & programs  Analysis and reporting of findings and trends  Consulting services to help transform teaching and learning Speak Up National Research Project + 3 million surveys since 2003
  •  Learning & Teaching with Technology  21st Century Skills: Digital Citizenship & Global Awareness  Math and Science Instruction  Students’ Career Interests in STEM  Professional Development / Teacher Preparation  Internet Safety  Administrators’ Challenges  Emerging Technologies both in & out of the Classroom  Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content, E-textbooks  Educational Games, Social Media tools and applications  Flipped Classroom, Print to Digital, Online Assessments  Designing the 21st Century School Speak Up survey question themes
  •  K-12 Students 364,233  Teachers & Librarians 56,346  Parents (in English & Spanish) 39,713  School/District Administrators 6,011  About the participating schools & districts o 8,020 schools and 2,431 districts o 30% urban / 43% rural / 27% suburban o All 50 states + DC  Honor Roll of States with highest participation: TX, CA, OH, IN, AL, NC, WI, AZ, FL, PA National Speak Up 2012 Participation: 466,303
  • Speak Up 2012 National Reports www.tomorrow.org/speakup
  • Digital Conversion K-12 Digital Learner
  • Digital Conversion K-12 Digital Learner Personalized Learning
  • Personalized Learning A shift in what we do, but also in our attitudes and values
  • Views of K-12 Students, Parents , Teachers & Administrators Speak Up 2012 National Findings Personalized Learning
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 How do you use technology and the Internet at home? Students in grades 3-5: Play online and video games 60% Doing Internet research on things that interest me 47% Watch TV shows online 42% Participate in virtual worlds 30% Text message family and friends 29% Share photos 27% Update a personal online profile 22% Create videos to post online 19%
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 18% 26% 12% 41%40% 41% 30% 54% Smartphone Tablet Digital Reader Laptop K-2 Students Gr 3-5 Students What personal access do you have to these mobile devices?
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Every day 17% A few days a week 54% Thru a mobile device? 19% How often do you access the Internet from home to help you with your schoolwork? Students in grades 3-5: 71%
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 How do you use technology at school for learning? Play educational games 61% Do Internet research for assignments 58% Take tests online 42% Complete writing assignments 39% Create presentations 34% Check grades 32% Watch online videos 20% Use online textbooks 14% Email or text my teacher 13% Students in grades 3-5:
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 How important is the use of technology to your child/student’s future? Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools Parents Principals Parents Principals Parents Principals Extremely Important 54% 51% 57% 50% 58% 49% Important 34% 42% 32% 42% 32% 43% Somewhat Important 10% 6% 9% 7% 9% 8% Not Important 2% 1% 2% 1% 2% 1%
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 What concerns do you have about technology use at your child’s school? Parents of elementary students: Not enough computers for every child to use 41% Technology use is too dependent upon individual teachers 31% Students don’t have access to technology 20%
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Cell phone without Internet access Smartphone Tablet computer Parents – 2008 90% 32% 5% Parents – 2012 35% 73% 49% Increased interest in digital learning? Growth in mobile device access by parents
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Elementary School Parents Middle School Parents High School Parents Communicating via text messages 86% 86% 86% Maintaining a social networking site 62% 55% 52% Watching online videos 40% 36% 34% Streaming online TV shows 37% 34% 32% Playing online or mobile app games 30% 28% 25% Using Twitter 14% 13% 13% Use of social media by parents, also.
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 What’s waking up our administrators in the middle of the night? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Test scores Funding Achievement gap Parent communications Adequate technology High School Principals Middle School Principals Elementary School Principals
  • “Children learn best when they are engaged with the content, can manipulate it so that their learning is flexible, and when learning is social- in that they share and exchange ideas about their learning within real world applications. Technology can bring into the classroom the real world and help learning become alive and real in time.” School Principal (NY) Response to Speak Up 2012 Question
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 What are the benefits of using digital content within instruction? Elementary school principals say: Increases student engagement and motivation 69% Personalizes learning 51% Improves quality of instructional materials 44% Increases relevancy of instructional materials 43% Improves teacher productivity 44%
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 But, why the particular interest in intelligent adaptive software? Elementary school principals say: Providing “just right” instruction 67% Differentiating instruction within large classes 66% Enabling self-directed learning 65% Supporting teachers with real time reporting 54% Increasing the effectiveness of using technology 46%
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Looking to the future What experiences/skills do you think pre-service teachers should have within their teacher prep programs? Elementary principals say: How to differentiate instruction using technology 65% How to source and use digital content tools 58% How to implement intelligent adaptive software 55% How to leverage educational games within instruction 41%
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Teachers’ use of digital content Type of Digital Content Elementary Teachers Videos found online 48% Games 44% Real time data 24% Online curriculum 21% Online textbooks 19% Animations 19% Self-created videos 6% Intelligent adaptive software 5%
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Teachers’ use of digital content Type of Digital Content Elementary Teachers Videos found online 48% Games 44% Real time data 24% Online curriculum 21% Online textbooks 19% Animations 19% Self-created videos 6% Intelligent adaptive software 5% Growth of 69% since 2008
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Teachers’ use of intelligent adaptive software Amongst teachers who are using intelligent adaptive software, what are their goals? Collect meaningful assessment data 71% Create a learning centric classroom 70% Facilitate student collaborations 69% Help student visualize difficult concepts 69% Practice or reinforce skills 68% Introduction of new concepts 66% Address different learning styles 64% Increase student engagement 63%
  • Imagine you are designing the ultimate school for today’s students, what digital tools and resources would have the greatest impact on learning? Do we have a shared vision?
  • (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Creating more personalized learning environments 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Games Online textbooks Tablets Schoolwide Internet Intelligent Adaptive Software Elementary Principals Elementary Teachers Elementary Parents Students Gr 3-5
  • Targeted and thematic reports Online learning trends Mobile learning & social media Print to digital migration Social learning Intelligent adaptive software New digital parent series Presentations, podcasts and webinars Research reports: digital content, mobile learning, 21st century skill development, professional development (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 For more Speak Up data and reports
  • “If I was a teacher, I would make learning fun with smartphones, tablets, and websites by letting everyone bring their own to school. In my class, we would have textbooks on tablets so there would be no cutting down trees. Kids in my class would have everything on their smartphones, tablets, and they could download apps for science, math and reading. It would be a lot of fun if there were smartphones, tablets, and websites at school. The kids in my class would really love it.” Fifth Grade Boy (PA) Response to Speak Up 2012 Question
  • Thank you. Let’s continue this conversation. Julie Evans Project Tomorrow jevans@tomorrow.org 949-609-4660 x15 Twitter: JulieEvans_PT Copyright Project Tomorrow 2013 This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.
  • One View of Personalization • Content Delivery: Making recommendations for lessons, videos, readings, or assignments to do next (often “crowd-sourced” & using “big data”)
  • • Assessment: Giving a student slightly harder or easier problems next Another View of Personalization
  • Personalized Learning? Will County, Illinois One-Room Schoolhouse, http://polarbearstale.blogspot.com/
  • Personalized Learning? • Learning to Drive a Manual Transmission
  • Future of Personalization • “In the Moment” • Track, Analyze & Respond to Everything – Answers – Strategies – Specific Mistakes – Interactions, Investigations • Lessons Built Specifically to be Adaptive • Responding Similar to How a Professional Educator would in a 1-1 situation
  • Improve Learning through Personalization. Not Prescription.
  • Plan Backwards • “Contemporary school reform efforts… typically focus too much on various means: structures, schedules, programs, PD, curric ulum, and instructional practices (like cooperative learning).” [or personalized learning]. • Certainly such reforms serve as the fuel for the school improvement engine, but they must not be mistaken as the destination…*which is+ improved learning.” p. 234-235, Wiggins & McTighe, © 2007
  • Learning is intensely personal
  • Goal: Improved Learning • Personalization o A strategy to achieve learning goals for all students o Honor each student’s ideas o Enable sense-making o Support transfer of learning o Levels of achievable challenge o Curriculum matters o Pedagogy matters o Enhanced by technology
  • Learning is Not Linear © Rovio
  • Learning is Not Linear
  • Learning Theory “The notion that learning comes about by the accretion of little bits is outmoded learning theory. Current models of learning based on cognitive psychology contend that learners gain understanding when they construct their own knowledge and develop their own cognitive maps of the interconnections among facts and concepts.” (pp. 5–6) Shepard, L. A. (1989, April). Why we need better assessments. Educational Leadership, 46(7) quoted in Schooling by Design, Wiggins & McTighe, © 2007 p. 46
  • Personalization shouldn’t be linear. Typical “adaptive” programs DreamBox Learning: Intelligent Adaptive Learning Engine
  • Personalization Requires Differentiation • Teachers have a responsibility to ensure that all of their students master important content. • Teachers have to make specific and continually evolving plans to connect each learner with key content. • Differences profoundly impact how students learn and the nature of scaffolding they will need at various points in the learning process. • Teachers should continually ask, “What does this student need at this moment in order to be able to progress with this key content, and what do I need to do to make that happen?” Leading and Managing a Differentiated Classroom by C.A. Tomlinson & M.B. Imbeau, ASCD, © 2010, pp. 13-14
  • Formative, Personalized Feedback What incorrect answers would we expect on 29 + 62 = ? – 19 Student adds all four digits – 33 Student believes this is a subtraction problem – 81 Student does not regroup to the tens place – 92 Arithmetic error in ones place – 811 Student adds each column independently – 2962 Student combines digits • How would you “score” each error? • How would you respond to each error? • What lesson(s) need to come before & after? • Which of these errors are “naturally occurring?”
  • Honoring Students’ Ideas
  • Learning Principles • “An understanding is a learner realization about the power of an idea.” • “Understandings cannot be given; they have to be engineered so that learners see for themselves the power of an idea for making sense of things.” p. 113, Schooling by Design, Wiggins & McTighe, ©2007
  • Engineered for exploration
  • Engineered for realizations
  • Engineered for understanding
  • Curriculum & Pedagogy Matter • Single Linear Sequence • Learning Objectives – Narrow, Behavioral – Isolated Knowledge – Low-Level Skills • “Giving” Understandings • Students as Listeners • Weak Progressions • Lacking Connections • Millions of Pathways • Learning Objectives – Big Ideas, Sense-Making – Conceptual Frameworks – Strategic Skills • Authentic Conceptions • Students as Doers • Consistent Progressions • Coherent Connections Prescription Personalization
  • What Are Students Doing? • Acquire Knowledge – Watching & Listening – Practicing (problems like the examples they just saw) • Make Meaning – Manipulating, Exploring – Testing Ideas • Transfer Independently – Strategizing amidst Complexity – Solving Open Ended Problems with no Scaffolding
  • Support educators with real-time data to help personalize instruction
  • Support educators with real-time data to help personalize instruction
  • Adapt continuously to individualize the learning path for each unique mind
  • Q & A
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