Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
How to Sell to Doctors Module 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

How to Sell to Doctors Module 1

1,216

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,216
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. &nbsp;<p style="text-align: left;">Hello and welcome to this “How to Sell to Physicians” course.I’m your coach Dr. Vicki Rackner. I’m a physician who’s spent the past decade helpingthousands of people manage their relationships with doctors so they get what theywant.</p><p style="text-align: left;">This course is about helping you get what you want--to makemore sales to more physicians.</p><p style="text-align: left;">In many ways building relationships with physician clients islike dating. You decide who you want to meet, you make yourself attractive to thatperson then you create a strategy about how and when to meet them.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Think of me as your physician matchmaker. Here you’llidentify the best-fit physician niche, and craft your marketing message so doctors listen.You’ll learn how to get around the gatekeepers, because I’ll show you the back doors.You’ll learn the small changes that get big results. Even something like mastering the“mental handshake” -- demonstrating to doctors you’re not armed with a sales pitch--helps build rapid rapport and shortens the sales cycle.</p><p style="text-align: left;">I’m here to help you take the fastest and most direct course tothe business results you want--more physician clients and more sales.</p><p style="text-align: left;">In this session you’ll:</p><ul style="text-align: left;">! <li>Get an overview of the world of medicine</li>! <li>Understand what makes physicians tick</li>! <li>Begin to consider your best-fit physician niches</li></ul><h2 style="text-align: left;">Physician Career Stages</h2><p style="text-align: left;">Let’s begin at the beginning. What are the steps to becominga physician?</p><p style="text-align: left;">Most of my medical school classmates came from doctorfamilies. They knew from early on they wanted to go into medicine and follow in thefootsteps of their fathers--and sometimes mothers. While I had relatives who weredoctors, I was on a different career path. At age 24, when I was a graduate student, Ihad a life-threatening surgical crisis. I woke from my emergency operation just knowingI would become a doctor and save the lives of others like my own had been saved. Andnot surprisingly I became a surgeon.</p><p style="text-align: left;">The vast majority of medical students go directly from collegegraduation in June to to medical school July 1 and graduate four years later at age 25.Then they enter a 3 to 5 year residency training. My own general surgery residency wasa five year program. If I wanted to be a heart surgeon I would tack on another 3 years offellowship training. On average doctors begin their first real jobs in their mid-thirtiescarrying about $100K in medical school debt.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Here are the qualities medical schools seek out inapplicants:</p><ul>! <li>Intelligence</li>
  • 2. ! <li>Pursuit of excellence</li>! <li>Willingness to defer gratification</li>! <li>Single-minded focus</li>! <li>Leadership skills</li>! <li>Self-confidence</li>! <li>Integrity.</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;">Physicians must be temperamentally inclined to:</p><ul>! <li>Focus attention on what’s most important</li>! <li>Ignore distractions.</li>! <li>Work long hours</li>! <li>Be with people in pain</li>! <li>Make life-altering decisions</li>! <li>Put their patients first.</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;">Ironically, the same factors that you would value in your ownpersonal physician become barriers when the same person is your prospect.</p><p style="text-align: left;">As you work with doctors you’ll discover that most are drivenby a sense of purpose, and that purpose is to serve. They’re primarily driven by theirdesire to:</p><ul>! <li>Alleviate pain and suffering</li>! <li>Help others</li>! <li>Establish their legacy.</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;">To choose language that resonates with doctors, replace“sales” with “service” and “profit” with “results.” The words “You can expect a 6-foldROI.” are not as compelling to doctors as, “You can reach more patients.” or “You canimprove your family’s security.”</p><h2 style="text-align: left;">The Culture of Medicine</h2><p style="text-align: left;">This is a very scary time for doctors. Physicians carefullyfollow Medicare legislation; they know if Medicare drops their rates by 20% privateinsurance companies will follow suit. One friend said, “How many business people havetheir salaries set by congress?</p><p style="text-align: left;">They feel the economic challenges. Most physician are doingjust fine. What you might not know is that others are struggling.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Then there are the uncertainties about health care reform. Weknow that the shift to electronic medical records will happen. There will be costlyregulation. Physicians’ top worries in many surveys include:</p><ul>! <li>Decreasing reimbursements</li>
  • 3. ! <li>Rising expenses</li>! <li>Costly regulatory changes.</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;">If you sit down and really talk to doctors you’ll discoveradditional concerns that keep them up at night:</p><ul>! <li>Fear of being sued</li>! <li>Loss of autonomy</li>! <li>Unhappy, grumpy patients</li>! <li>Referrals that come too late or not at all.</li>! <li>Staffing conflicts</li>! <li>Burn-out</li>! <li>Work-life balance</li>! <li>Patient complications/ deaths.</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;">Many physicians feel alone, unappreciated and evenbetrayed. What happened to the dream that drew them to a career in medicine? How doI get here?</p><p style="text-align: left;">Every one of these concerns is a business opportunity foryou. Doctors want solutions to these problems. They can afford to pay consultants whocan help..</p><h2 style="text-align: left;">Finding Your Niche</h2><p style="text-align: left;">They say the riches are in the niches. Successful businessesidentify good-fit physician clients. Your niche shapes your marketing approach and yourvalue proposition. To help you identify your niche, let me give you ways to slice thephysician pie.</p><p style="text-align: left;"><strong>Practice Setting: How they Generate Revenue</strong></p><p style="text-align: left;">Physicians generate revenue in one of three ways:</p><ul>! <li>Self-employed in a private practice or small groups,</li>! <li>Employed at a hospital or clinic or business</li>! <li>Tenured at an academic facility.</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;">Within each general area there are sub-niches: doctorsemployed in the VA hospital system or HMO’s like Group Health or physician benefitsmanagers in large businesses. When I was out speaking about chronic painmanagement I had a fascinating conversation with nurses who deliver care toprisoners.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Revenue-generating activities include:</p><ul>! <li>Direct patient care</li>! <li>Administrative and leadership contributions</li>
  • 4. ! <li>Clinical Research</li>! <li>Advance business goals</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;"><strong>Specialty</strong></p><p style="text-align: left;">There’s a pecking order among physicians. Doctors whoperform high-risk invasive procedures enjoy better social status, more political clout andhigher incomes than primary care practitioners are found on the lower rungs.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Here are the top-earners:</p><ul>! <li>Neurosurgeons</li>! <li>Orthopedic Surgeons</li>! <li>Cardiac Surgeons/ Cardiologists</li>! <li>Radiologists</li>! <li>Urologists</li>! <li>Dermatologists/Plastic Surgeons</li>! <li>Anesthesiologists</li>! <li>Gastroenterologists</li>! <li>ENT Surgeons</li>! <li>Ophthalmologists</li></ul><strong>Generation: Boomer vs. Millennial</strong><p style="text-align: left;">Boomers and Millennials are like different breeds of doctor.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Boomers physicians have a higher net worth, but they’reharder to reach because they’re also more distrustful. The Millennials tend to be teamplayers with a higher emotional intelligence and more awareness about socialboundaries.</p><p style="text-align: left;"><strong>Life stage</strong></p><p style="text-align: left;">Groups of physicians in similar life stages share more thanothers of the same age. Here are a few life stage that could impact your marketing:</p><ul>! <li>Caring for children who live at home.</li>! <li>Caring for aging parents</li>! <li>Caring for both children at home and aging parents</li>! <li>Newly married</li>! <li>Newly divorced</li>! <li>New practice setting ( sold the medical practice and is now a clinic/hospitalemployee)</li>! <li>New financial challenges</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;"><strong>Gender</strong></p><p style="text-align: left;">Men and women physicians have different experiences thatcould shape your offerings, and your marketing. I held a leadership position at theAmerican Medical Woman’s Assoc.</p>
  • 5. <p style="text-align: left;"><strong>Business acumen</strong></p><p style="text-align: left;">Some doctors have better business sense than others. Hereare the doctors who have the highest business savvy:</p><ul>! <li>Dermatologists</li>! <li>Plastic surgeons</li>! <li>Dentists</li>! <li>Orthodontists</li>! <li>Chiropractors</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;">If you help medical practices become more profitable, thesewould be your target markets.</p><h2 style="text-align: left;">What do physicians want?</h2><p style="text-align: left;">They want many of the same things you want. They want togo to bed at night and say, “I made a positive difference today.” Here are some itemsoften in short supply:</p><ul>! <li>Be appreciated.</li>! <li>Have a listening ear</li>! <li>Avoid burnout</li>! <li>Get back to the dream</li>! <li>Know someone has their back.</li></ul><h2 style="text-align: left;">How do physicians make purchasing choices?</h2><p style="text-align: left;">Doctors add links in the chain of trust.</p><p style="text-align: left;">I heard about my insurance agent Fred Green the way mostdoctors learn about advisors --I asked other doctors in the surgeon’s lounge.</p><p style="text-align: left;">Fred Green did a good job for me over the years. If anyoneasked, I would have been happy to recommend him. But one day Fred offered suchextraordinary service I began talking about him. Very briefly, I got pregnant and madesure my OB was a participating provider in my insurance plan.  A few weeks before mydue date I found out that the hospital where he delivered babies was no longer aparticipating facility in my insurance plan. I was weeks from my due date, and I might beresponsible for half of the hospital bill.</p><p style="text-align: left;">I called Fred Green in a state of panic. He told me we couldfix it by changing insurance policies effective at the beginning of the month. He drove tomy office with the paperwork and personally faxed in the forms. Everything worked outfine. My son’s 14 years old, and I still tell the Fred Green story and refer people hisway.</p><p style="text-align: left;">You want to be the Fred Green of your industry. You want tohave your name mentioned because of your distinctive service.</p><h2 style="text-align: left;">Up Next</h2>
  • 6. <p style="text-align: left;">In the next weeks, you’ll get ideas about how to get there.Each module in this course points the way, showing you what to do.</p><p style="text-align: left;">However, each action begins with a thought. That’s why eachmodule includes a coaching session coaching to help you choose the most helpfulthoughts.</p><p style="text-align: left;">This Tuesday we’ll explore common thoughts that shapeinteractions with doctors. I’ve observed that the biggest barrier to success in thisphysician niche is not the gatekeeper; it’s the person in the mirror. Your parentscoached you how to act with doctors, and this behavior is deeply ingrained. Yourparents’ lessons will undermine your ability to step up and become your physicianclient’s trusted advisor.</p><p style="text-align: left;">I invite you to think about these questions:</p><ul>! <li>What are your earliest memories about doctors?</li>! <li>What do you look for in a doctor today?</li>! <li>What would an ideal office visit experience be like?</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;">I also challenge you to get some practice talking to doctors.Initiate some casual conversations with doctors in your social circles. Pretend you’re ajournalist and ask:</p><ul>! <li>What drew you to a career in medicine your specialty?</li>! <li>What made you choose your specialty?</li>! <li>What are some of your proudest moments?</li>! <li>What are your favorite professional activities?</li>! <li>What is your favorite procedure?</li>! <li>What is your favorite kind of patient?</li>! <li>What is your favorite problem to solve?</li>! <li>What keeps you up at night?</li>! <li>If you could change one thing about your medical practice, what would it be?</li>! <li>Who is your hero? Why?</li>! <li>If you knew you could not fail, what project would you take on?</li>! <li>How do you know you’ve had a good day?</li>! <li>Who are your mentors, and what are the most important things they’ve taughtyou?</li>! <li>What do you do when patients ignore your advice?</li></ul><p style="text-align: left;">Thank for joining this group. Look forward to working with youand watching your sales grow.</p>Hello and welcome to this “How to Sell to Physicians”course. I’m your coach Dr. Vicki Rackner. I’m a physician who’s spent the past decadehelping thousands of people manage their relationships with doctors so they get whatthey want.
  • 7. This course is about helping you get what you want--to make more sales to morephysicians.In many ways building relationships with physician clients is like dating. You decide whoyou want to meet, you make yourself attractive to that person then you create a strategyabout how and when to meet them.Think of me as your physician matchmaker. Here you’ll identify the best-fit physicianniche, and craft your marketing message so doctors listen. You’ll learn how to getaround the gatekeepers, because I’ll show you the back doors. You’ll learn the smallchanges that get big results. Even something like mastering the “mental handshake” --demonstrating to doctors you’re not armed with a sales pitch-- helps build rapid rapportand shortens the sales cycle.I’m here to help you take the fastest and most direct course to the business results youwant--more physician clients and more sales.In this session you’ll: •Get an overview of the world of medicine •Understand what makes physicians tick •Begin to consider your best-fit physician nichesPhysician Career StagesLet’s begin at the beginning. What are the steps to becoming a physician?Most of my medical school classmates came from doctor families. They knew fromearly on they wanted to go into medicine and follow in the footsteps of their fathers--andsometimes mothers. While I had relatives who were doctors, I was on a different careerpath. At age 24, when I was a graduate student, I had a life-threatening surgical crisis.I woke from my emergency operation just knowing I would become a doctor and savethe lives of others like my own had been saved. And not surprisingly I became asurgeon.The vast majority of medical students go directly from college graduation in June to tomedical school July 1 and graduate four years later at age 25. Then they enter a 3 to 5year residency training. My own general surgery residency was a five year program. IfI wanted to be a heart surgeon I would tack on another 3 years of fellowship training.On average doctors begin their first real jobs in their mid-thirties carrying about $100K inmedical school debt.Here are the qualities medical schools seek out in applicants: • Intelligence • Pursuit of excellence
  • 8. • Willingness to defer gratification • Single-minded focus • Leadership skills •. Self-confidence • Integrity.Physicians must be temperamentally inclined to: • Focus attention on what’s most important • Ignore distractions. • Work long hours • Be with people in pain • Make life-altering decisions • Put their patients first.Ironically, the same factors that you would value in your own personal physicianbecome barriers when the same person is your prospect.As you work with doctors you’ll discover that most are driven by a sense ofpurpose, and that purpose is to serve. They’re primarily driven by their desire to: • Alleviate pain and suffering • Help others • Establish their legacy.To choose language that resonates with doctors, replace “sales” with “service” and“profit” with “results.” The words “You can expect a 6-fold ROI.” are not as compelling todoctors as, “You can reach more patients.” or “You can improve your family’s security.”The Culture of MedicineThis is a very scary time for doctors. Physicians carefully follow Medicare legislation;they know if Medicare drops their rates by 20% private insurance companies will followsuit. One friend said, “How many business people have their salaries set by congress?They feel the economic challenges. Most physician are doing just fine. What you mightnot know is that others are struggling.Then there are the uncertainties about health care reform. We know that the shift toelectronic medical records will happen. There will be costly regulation. Physicians’ topworries in many surveys include: •Decreasing reimbursements •Rising expenses •Costly regulatory changes.
  • 9. If you sit down and really talk to doctors you’ll discover additional concerns that keepthem up at night: •Fear of being sued •Loss of autonomy •Unhappy, grumpy patients •Referrals that come too late or not at all. •Staffing conflicts •Burn-out •Work-life balance •Patient complications/ deathsMany physicians feel alone, unappreciated and even betrayed. What happened to thedream that drew them to a career in medicine? How do I get here?Every one of these concerns is a business opportunity for you. Doctors want solutionsto these problems. They can afford to pay consultants who can help..Finding Your NicheThey say the riches are in the niches. Successful businesses identify good-fit physicianclients. Your niche shapes your marketing approach and your value proposition. Tohelp you identify your niche, let me give you ways to slice the physician pie.Practice Setting: How they Generate RevenuePhysicians generate revenue in one of three ways: •Self-employed in a private practice or small groups, •Employed at a hospital or clinic or business •Tenured at an academic facility.Within each general area there are sub-niches: doctors employed in the VA hospitalsystem or HMO’s like Group Health or physician benefits managers in large businesses.When I was out speaking about chronic pain management I had a fascinatingconversation with nurses who deliver care to prisoners.Revenue-generating activities include: •Direct patient care •Administrative and leadership contributions •Clinical Research •Advance business goalsSpecialty
  • 10. There’s a pecking order among physicians. Doctors who perform high-risk invasiveprocedures enjoy better social status, more political clout and higher incomes thanprimary care practitioners are found on the lower rungs.Here are the top-earners: •Neurosurgeons •Orthopedic Surgeons •Cardiac Surgeons/ Cardiologists •Radiologists •Urologists •Dermatologists/Plastic Surgeons •Anesthesiologists •Gastroenterologists •ENT Surgeons •OphthalmologistsGeneration: Boomer vs. MillennialBoomers and Millennials are like different breeds of doctor.Boomers physicians have a higher net worth, but they’re harder to reach becausethey’re also more distrustful. The Millennials tend to be team players with a higheremotional intelligence and more awareness about social boundaries.Life stageGroups of physicians in similar life stages share more than others of the same age.Here are a few life stage that could impact your marketing: •Caring for children who live at home. •Caring for aging parents •Caring for both children at home and aging parents •Newly married •Newly divorced •New practice setting ( sold the medical practice and is now a clinic/hospital employee) •New financial challengesGenderMen and women physicians have different experiences that could shape your offerings,and your marketing. I held a leadership position at the American Medical Woman’sAssoc.
  • 11. Business acumenSome doctors have better business sense than others. Here are the doctors who havethe highest business savvy: •Dermatologists •Plastic surgeons •Dentists •Orthodontists •ChiropractorsIf you help medical practices become more profitable, these would be your targetmarkets.What do physicians want?They want many of the same things you want. They want to go to bed at night and say,“I made a positive difference today.” Here are some items often in short supply: •Be appreciated. •Have a listening ear •Avoid burnout •Get back to the dream •Know someone has their back.How do physicians make purchasing choices?Doctors add links in the chain of trust.I heard about my insurance agent Fred Green the way most doctors learn aboutadvisors --I asked other doctors in the surgeon’s lounge.Fred Green did a good job for me over the yers. If anyone asked, I would have beenhappy to recommend him. But one day Fred offered such extraordinary service I begantelling the story. Very briedfly, I got pregnant and made sure my OB was a participatingprovider in my insurance plan. A few weeks before my due date I found out that thehospital where he delivered babies was no longer a participating facility in myinsurance plan. I was weeks from my due date, and I might be responsible for half ofthe hospital bill. I called Fred Green in a state of panic. He told me we could fix it bychanging insurance policies effective at the beginning of the month. He drove to myoffice with the paperwork and personally faxed in the forms. Everything worked out fine.My son’s 14 years old, and I still tell the Fred Green story and refer people his way.You want to be the Fred Green of your industry. You want to have your namementioned because of your distinctive service.
  • 12. Up NextIn the next weeks, you’ll get ideas about how to get there. Each module in this coursepoints the way, showing you what to do.However, each action begins with a thought. That’s why each module includes acoaching session coaching to help you choose the most helpful thoughts.This Tuesday we’ll explore common thoughts that shape interactions with doctors. I’veobserved that the biggest barrier to success in this physician niche is not thegatekeeper; it’s the person in the mirror. Your parents coached you how to act withdoctors, and this behavior is deeply ingrained. Your parents’ lessons will undermineyour ability to step up and become your physician client’s trusted advisor.I invite you to think about these questions: •What are your earliest memories about doctors? •What do you look for in a doctor today? •What would an ideal office visit experience be like?I also challenge you to get some practice talking to doctors. Initiate some casualconversations with doctors in your social circles. Pretend you’re a journalist and ask: •What drew you to a career in medicine your specialty? •What made you choose your specialty? •What are some of your proudest moments? •What are your favorite professional activities? •What is your favorite procedure? •What is your favorite kind of patient? •What is your favorite problem to solve? •What keeps you up at night? •If you could change one thing about your medical practice, what would it be? •Who is your hero? Why? •If you knew you could not fail, what project would you take on? •How do you know you’ve had a good day? •Who are your mentors, and what are the most important things they’ve taught you? •What do you do when patients ignore your advice?Thank for joining this group. Look forward to working with you and watching your salesgrow.

×