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TIP 25 Domestic Violence

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Mental Health continuing education and addictions counselor training series. Narrated versions available at http://www.allceus.com

Mental Health continuing education and addictions counselor training series. Narrated versions available at http://www.allceus.com

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  • The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-193), signed into law on August 22, 1996, calls for greater use of paternity determinations to enforce child support regulations. This can be problematic for welfare recipients who are victims of domestic violence. Abuse is often exacerbated or reactivated when legal action is taken against the batterer for child support. Many abused women are afraid to seek child support because they fear that doing so will result in the batterer being given visitation rights, which would force disclosure of their new location. Although current Federal law does provide \"good cause\" exemptions in a number of situations, including domestic violence, this option is used by fewer than 1 percent of welfare applicants nationally (Raphael, 1996; Zorza, 1995b). Providers should tell survivor clients concerned about confidentiality that these exemptions exist.
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    • 1. TIP 25: Substance Abuse Treatment and Domestic Violence Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC Dawn-Elise Snipes PhD, LMHC, CRC, NCC
    • 2. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC INTRODUCTION • Domestic violence is the use of intentional emotional, psychological, sexual, or physical force by one family member or intimate partner to control another. • Researchers have found that one fourth to one half of men who commit acts of domestic violence have substance abuse problems. • While domestic violence affects a variety of populations, this Quick Guide only discusses the treatment of adult male batterers and adult female survivors.
    • 3. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC THEIR CONNECTIONS • The Connections Between Substance Abuse and Domestic Violence: ▫ Substance abuse doesn't quot;causequot; domestic violence although it may afflict both batterers and survivors. ▫ Failure to address domestic violence may interfere with treatment effectiveness. ▫ A substance abusing woman may find her abusive partner becomes angry when she seeks help; his violence could push her to drop out of treatment. ▫ Some batterers are worse domestic violence offenders when they are sober therefore partners of such batterers may try to subvert treatment efforts.
    • 4. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC CREATE LINKAGES • To effect lasting change, people working in both fields must recognize the importance of holistic treatment and learn to collaborate on the client's behalf. • This Quick Guide presents pertinent information on holistic treatment of domestic violence situations that substance abuse treatment clinicians will need. • This will include creating linkages with groups pertinent to a client's recovery, including: ▫ Domestic violence programs ▫ Health care communities ▫ The criminal justice system ▫ Schools and educational institutes ▫ Employers ▫ Social welfare
    • 5. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SCREENING SURVIVORS • If a client believes that she is in immediate danger from a batterer, the treatment provider should respond to this situation before addressing any other issues. • Always interview clients about domestic violence in private. • Ask about violence using concrete examples and hypothetical situations rather than vague, conceptual questions. • In framing screening questions, it is extremely important to convey to the survivor that there is no justification for the battering and that substance abuse is no excuse. • Questions such as the following serve the dual purpose of determining whether the client's partner may be a substance abuser while reinforcing to her that substance abuse is not the real reason for his violence ▫ Does he blame his violence on his alcohol or drug use? ▫ Does he use alcohol (or other drugs) as an excuse for his violence?
    • 6. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SCREENING SURVIVORS cont… • Once it is confirmed that a client has been or is being battered, domestic violence experts should be contacted. • Providers should be alert to the possibility that the mother of a child who has been or is being abused by her partner is also being abused herself. • The provider should contact a forensics expert to document the physical evidence of battering. • Once the client has entered substance abuse treatment, a treatment plan that includes a relapse prevention plan and a safety plan should be developed.
    • 7. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SCREENING SURVIVORS cont… • Clues for the Treatment Provider: ▫ stress-related illnesses and conditions (such as headache, backache, chronic pain, gastrointestinal distress, sleep disorders, eating disorders and fatigue) ▫ anxiety-related conditions (such as heart palpitations, hyperventilation, and panic attacks) ▫ sad, depressed affect; talk of suicide ▫ physical injuries around the face, neck and throat ▫ inconsistent/evasive answers when questioned about injuries ▫ history of relapse or noncompliance with substance abuse treatment ▫ stress-related illness and conditions ▫ complications in pregnancy
    • 8. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SCREENING SURVIVORS cont… • The way in which a client describes her partner's treatment of her can also be a clue to possible domestic violence. Does he: ▫ isolate her? ▫ force her to sell drugs? ▫ harm other family members or pets? ▫ threaten to hurt her, himself or others? • Child abuse is also a clue.
    • 9. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC CRISIS INTERVENTION • Ensure her safety • Assure her she is believed • Identify her options • Evaluate health concerns, including any need for detoxification • Attend to anything that may interrupt the initiation of treatment
    • 10. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC TREATMENT PLANNING FOR THE SURVIVOR • Survivors appear to benefit by participating in same-sex treatment groups. • Do not use confrontational techniques. • Survivors can be asked to sign a quot;no-contact contract‖ • Referrals should be made whenever appropriate for psychotherapy and specialized counseling. • Should a client decide to relocate to another community, refer her to the appropriate programs within that community. • Because batterers in treatment frequently harass their partners by circumventing program rules and threatening them by phone, by mail and by sending messages through other approved visitors, telephone and visitation privileges should be carefully monitored in residential substance abuse treatment programs.
    • 11. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SAFETY FROM THE BATTERER: IN AN EMERGENCY ▫ If you are at home and you are being attacked:  Stay away from the kitchen (the abuser can find weapons there such as knives)  Stay away from bathrooms, closets or small spaces where the abuser can trap you  Get to a room with a door or window to escape  Get to a room with a phone to call for help; lock the abuser outside if you can  Call 911 (or your local emergency number) right away for help; get the dispatcher's name
    • 12. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SAFETY FROM THE BATTERER: IN AN EMERGENCY cont… ▫ If you are at home and you are being attacked:  Think about a neighbor or friend you can run to for help  If a police officer comes, tell him/her what happened; get his/her name and badge number  Get medical help if you are hurt  Take pictures of bruises and injuries  Call a domestic violence program or shelter (some are listed at the end of this document); ask them to help you make a safety plan
    • 13. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF AT HOME • Learn where to get help; memorize emergency phone numbers • Keep a phone in a room you can lock from the inside; if you can, get a cellular phone that you keep with you at all times • If the abuser has moved out, change the locks on your door; get locks on the window • Plan an escape route out of your home; teach it to your children • Think about where you would go if you need to escape
    • 14. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF AT HOME cont… • Ask your neighbors to call the police if they see the abuser at your house; make a signal for them to call the police; for example, if the phone rings twice, a shade is pulled down or a light is on. • Pack a bag with important things you'd need if you have to leave quickly, put it in a safe place, or give it to a friend or relative you trust. • Include cash, car keys and important information such as: court papers, passport or birth certificate, medical records and medicines, immigration papers. • Get an unlisted phone number • Block caller ID • Use an answering machine; screen the calls • Take a good self-defense course
    • 15. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC HOW TO MAKE YOUR CHILDREN SAFER • Teach them not to get in the middle of a fight, even if they want to help. • Teach them how to: ▫ get to safety ▫ call 911 ▫ give your address and phone number to the police • Teach them to call for help • Tell them to stay out of the kitchen • At school or daycare center: ▫ give them a copy of your court order ▫ tell them not to release your children to anyone without talking to you first ▫ use a password so they can be sure it is you on the phone ▫ give them a photo of the abuser • Make sure the children know who to tell at school if they see the abuser. • Make sure the school knows not to give your address or phone number to anyone.
    • 16. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF OUTSIDE THE HOME • Change your regular travel habits • Try to get rides with different people • Shop and bank in a different place • Cancel any bank accounts or credit cards you shared; open new accounts at a different bank • Keep your court order and emergency numbers with you at all times • Keep a cell phone and program it to 911 (or other emergency number)
    • 17. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC HOW TO MAKE YOURSELF SAFER AT WORK • Keep a copy of your court order at work • Give a picture of the abuser to security and friends at work • Tell your supervisor—see if he or she can make it harder for the abuser to find you • Don't go to lunch alone • Ask a security guard to walk you to your car or to the bus • If the abuser calls you at work, save your voice mail and save e-mail • Your employer may be able to help you find community resources
    • 18. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC USING THE LAW TO HELP YOU • Protection or restraining orders ▫ Ask your local domestic violence program to help you get a civil protection order and to help you with criminal prosecution ▫ Ask for help finding a lawyer  In most places the judge can order the abuser to stay away from you and your children  Order the abuser to leave your home  Give you temporary custody of your children and order the abuser to pay you temporary child support  Order the police to come to your home while the abuser picks up personal belongings  Give you possession of the car, furniture and other belongings  Order the abuser to go to a batterers' intervention program  Order the abuser not to call you at work  Order the abuser to give guns to the police
    • 19. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC MAKE SURE YOU… • Show the judge any pictures of your injuries. • Tell the judge that you do not feel safe if the abuser comes to your home to pick up the children for visits with them. • Ask the judge to order the abuser to pick up and return the children at the police station or some other safe place. • Ask that any visits the abuser is permitted are at very specific times so the police will know by reading the court order if the abuser is there at the wrong time. • Tell the judge if the abuser has harmed or threatened the children; ask that visits be supervised; think about who could do that for you. • Get a certified copy of the court order.
    • 20. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS • Show the prosecutor your court orders. • Show the prosecutor medical records about your injuries or pictures if you have them. • Tell the prosecutor the name of anyone who is helping you (a victim advocate or lawyer). • Tell the prosecutor about any witnesses to injuries or abuse. • Ask the prosecutor to notify you ahead of time if the abuser is getting out of jail.
    • 21. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC BE SAFE AT THE COURT HOUSE • Sit as far away from the abuser as you can; you don't have to look at or talk to the abuser; you don't have to talk to the abuser's family or friends if they are there. • Bring a friend or relative to wait with you until your case is heard. • Tell a bailiff or sheriff that you are afraid of the abuser and ask him/her to look out for you. • Make sure you have your court order before you leave. • Ask the judge or sheriff to keep the abuser there for a while when court is over; leave quickly. • If you think the abuser is following you when you leave, call the police immediately.
    • 22. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES • Assume responsibility for her addiction • Dispel the notion she is responsible for her partner's behavior • Develop decision making skills • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder • Increased stress of abstinence • Client's perception of her own safety • Reversal of social isolation
    • 23. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES cont… • Parenting skills • Anger management • Financial • Occupational • Relapse prevention • Relationship skills
    • 24. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC ISSUES OF CHILD ABUSE OR NEGLECT • The confidentiality regulations in Title 42, Part 2 of the Code of Federal Regulations require that a client be given notice regarding the limitations of confidentiality–orally and in writing–upon admission to a substance abuse program.
    • 25. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SCREENING FOR CHILD ABUSE OR NEGLECT • Strong link between domestic violence and child abuse • Children can be primary or secondary victims • Children should be assessed by a clinician with special training in forensic interviewing with children. • Indications of child abuse that can be gleaned in a client interview include: ▫ Whether CPS has been involved with anyone who lives in the home ▫ Children's behaviors such as bedwetting and sexual acting out ▫ quot;Specialquot; closeness between a child and other adults in the household ▫ The occurrence of quot;blackoutsquot;: Batterers often claim blackouts for the period of time during which violence occurs. • If a treatment provider suspects that the child of a client has been a victim of violence, he or she must refer the child to a health care provider immediately, and in many states, make an immediate abuse report. • The treatment provider must assess the impact on a survivor client of reporting suspected or confirmed child abuse and develop a safety plan if necessary.
    • 26. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC REPORTING SUSPECTED NEGLECT OR ABUSE • Clients must be informed that mandated reporters, a category that includes substance abuse treatment providers, are required to notify Children's Protective Services (CPS) if they suspect child abuse or neglect. • Clients can be informed of the right to report their partner's abuse of children. • It is ultimately the mandated reporter's responsibility to ensure CPS is contacted in the event of suspected child abuse or neglect. • It is important to prepare for the impact of reporting child abuse on the children and the family as whole. • It is imperative for professionals working with family members to provide information to them about what to expect from CPS and, if at all possible, to talk with CPS caseworkers and accompany the family to any court hearings.
    • 27. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC THE ROLE OF TREATMENT PROVIDERS IN SUPPORTING THE MOTHER • Help her identify and coordinate various services available to her. • Support her efforts to participate in and take advantage of these services. • Listen as she voices her frustration about the difficulties of meeting the demands of the various agencies.
    • 28. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SCREENING TECHNIQUES AND QUESTIONS FOR BATTERERS • Do not to enable batterers to place blame on the victim or on alcohol and drugs. • Taking an open-ended social and family history gradually moving to specific, direct questions ▫ Have you ever been physically hurt by someone in your family? ▫ Have you ever hurt someone in your family? • Questions: ▫ Under certain circumstances, is it OK to hit your wife (girlfriend, etc.)? ▫ Under what circumstances do you think violence might be justified?
    • 29. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SCREENING TECHNIQUES AND QUESTIONS FOR BATTERERS cont… • Define violence by asking specifically, such as: ▫ When you hit her, was it a slap or a punch? ▫ Do you take her car keys away? ▫ Damage her property? ▫ Threaten to hurt or kill her? • Be direct and candid; avoid euphemisms such as, ―Is your relationship with your partner troubled?‖ Instead, talk about ―his violence‖ and keep the focus on ―his behavior.‖ • Become familiar with batterers' excuses for their behavior: ▫ Minimizing: quot;I only pushed her,quot; quot;She bruises easily,quot; quot;She exaggerates.quot; ▫ Citing good intentions: quot;She gets hysterical so I have to slap her to calm her down.quot; ▫ Use of alcohol and drugs: quot;I'm not myself when I drink.quot; ▫ Claiming loss of control: quot;Something snapped,quot; quot;I can only take so much,quot; quot;I was so angry, I didn't know what I was doing.quot; ▫ Blaming the partner: quot;She drove me to it,quot; quot;She really knows how to get to me.quot; ▫ Blaming someone or something else: quot;I was raised that way,quot; quot;My probation officer is putting a lot of pressure on me,quot; quot;I've been out of work.quot;
    • 30. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC THE quot;NO-VIOLENCE CONTRACTquot; • Treatment providers should try to ensure the safety of those who have been or may become victims of a perpetrator-client, in particular his partner and children, during any crisis that precedes or occurs during the course of his treatment. • Most effective when linkages with batterers' intervention programs are also in place • Can also help structure treatment by specifying an achievable behavioral goal
    • 31. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC RECOVERY PITFALLS FOR BATTERERS • 12-Step programs can support batterers' treatment and recovery. • Be alert to signs that clients are misinterpreting 12-Step philosophies to justify, excuse, or evade responsibility for their violence.
    • 32. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC ONGOING ATTENTION TO ISSUES OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE • The full dimensions of a domestic violence problem are seldom immediately clear and may emerge unexpectedly at a later stage in treatment.
    • 33. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC TREATMENT PLANNING FOR BATTERERS • Treatment providers should elicit the following information about the relationship between the substance abuse and the violent behavior: ▫ exactly when in relation to substance abuse the violence occurs ▫ how much of the violent behavior occurs while the batterer is drinking or on other drugs ▫ what substances are used before the violent act ▫ what feelings precede and accompany the use of alcohol or other drugs ▫ whether alcohol or other drugs are used to quot;recoverquot; from the violent incident • After identifying the chain of events that precede or trigger violent episodes, provider and client should together formulate strategies for modifying those behaviors and recognizing emotions that contribute to violent behavior. • Gauge client's acceptance of responsibility • Link client's actions with tangible consequences
    • 34. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC TREATMENT PLANNING FOR BATTERERS cont… • Encourage the batterer-client to develop enough self-awareness to recognize the beliefs and attitudes that are precursors to violence and to control the emotions that contribute to violence. • Formulate a treatment plan with strategies that ensure safety for the partner and family members. • Help the batterer focus on changing the behaviors and events that have precipitated violence or relapse. • Watch for and stop clients from condoning violence or reinforcing each others' excuse-making. • Raise the batterer's awareness of the impact his violence has on his children's future behavior. • Help batterers adopt nonviolent modes of behavior through anger management and coping skills. • Reinforce the importance of modeling nonviolent behavior in their interactions with their partners as well as their children.
    • 35. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC REFERRAL OF SURVIVORS • If the client reveals that she is in immediate danger, the counselor needs to attend to this before addressing other issues. • Advise the client to take simple legal precautions and to safeguard important documents, e.g., social security card, driver license, etc. • Discuss possible reprisal by the batterer if the police become involved and plan a response. • If a survivor client expresses concern about her children, refer her for shelter and legal advocacy. • Resources can be identified by contacting a local domestic violence program; a state program.
    • 36. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC REFERRAL OF BATTERERS • When suspected batterers are identified, substance abuse treatment providers should refer them to batterer's intervention programs as a key part of treatment planning. • With the client's signed consent to release information, substance abuse counselors can share pertinent information with domestic violence staff to ensure both problems are being addressed. • Family therapy or family intervention for batterers and their partners should be provided by a domestic violence specialist or program.
    • 37. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC TREATMENT COORDINATION • Care must be coordinated to address needs for: ▫ housing ▫ child care ▫ emotional and physical safety ▫ health and mental health care ▫ economic stability ▫ legal protection ▫ vocational and educational services ▫ parenting training and support ▫ peer counseling ▫ transportation • Substance abuse treatment providers, domestic violence experts, and legal or other relevant professionals should plan client treatment collaboratively.
    • 38. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC COLLABORATIVE CARE SERVICES • Should be: ▫ Client centered ▫ Holistic ▫ Flexible ▫ Collaborative ▫ Coordinated ▫ Accountable
    • 39. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC CASE MANAGEMENT • One practitioner needs to be the identified lead • Regular communication of all parties is essential—i.e. conference call, monthly case meetings • Cross-screening of various problems by various agencies is a major step toward linkage • Because of its influence on the client, integrating the criminal justice system's efforts is vital
    • 40. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC LEGAL ISSUES • Substance abuse treatment providers should be familiar with relevant federal, state, and local regulations as well as with the legal resources available to victims of domestic abuse. • Treatment providers must fulfill their legal obligation to report domestic violence and suspected child abuse and neglect. • Treatment providers should never discuss their client without the client's permission. • Only certain types of subpoenas and warrants require that records be turned over. • Treatment providers should coordinate their efforts with domestic violence workers to ensure that clients avoid problems under the provisions of quot;welfare reform.quot; (The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996).
    • 41. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC THE VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN ACT • Past sexual behavior or alleged sexual predisposition of the victim is no longer admissible evidence in civil or criminal proceedings involving sexual misconduct. • New federal criminal penalties apply to anyone who crosses a state line in order to commit domestic violence or to violate a civil protection order. • States are required to enforce civil protection orders issued by other states. • Victims must have the opportunity to testify regarding the potential danger of the pretrial release of a defendant. • Defendants are required to make financial restitution to victims. • The U.S. Postal Service is required to maintain the confidentiality of shelters and individual abuse victims by not disclosing their addresses or other locating information.
    • 42. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC LOCAL LAWS: CIVIL PROTECTION AND RESTRAINING ORDERS • Protection orders can be issued independently or as part of another proceeding • In most state courts, a parent or another adult can file for a civil protection order on behalf of a minor child • Conduct sufficient to support issuance of a civil protection order can include: ▫ criminal acts ▫ sexual assault and marital rape ▫ interference with personal liberty ▫ interference with child custody ▫ assaults involving motor vehicles ▫ harassing behaviors ▫ stalking ▫ emotional abuse ▫ damage to property
    • 43. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC DISCLOSURE AND CONSENT • State laws regulate the disclosure of patient information related to domestic violence. • These laws differ from federal laws that govern consent to disclose substance abuse-related information. • When it comes to reporting crimes that are discussed in treatment, the counselor must ask three questions: 1. Does state law require the program to make a report? 2. Does state law permit the program to make a report? 3. How can a report be made without violating the federal law and regulations governing confidentiality or patients' records?
    • 44. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC 5 AVENUES TO DUTY TO WARN 1. The program can make a report to the criminal justice agency that mandated the batterer into treatment… ▫ So long as there is a criminal justice system consent form signed by the batterer that is worded broadly enough to allow this sort of information to be disclosed. 2. The program can make a disclosure to the potential victim or law enforcement officials that does not identify the individual who has made the threat as being a patient in substance abuse treatment. 3. The program can go to court and request a court order authorizing the disclosure to the intended victim, or to a law enforcement agency. 4. The program can make a report to medical personnel if the threat poses an immediate danger to the health of any individual and requires immediate medical intervention. 5. The program can obtain the client's consent.
    • 45. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC LEGAL RESOURCES • State Department of Health • Single State Authority for Substance Abuse and/or Domestic Violence • State Attorney General • Local bar associations • Agency board members who are attorneys • Local advocacy groups for people experiencing domestic violence • Local law schools
    • 46. Copyright 2008-2012 AllCEUs.com a subsidiary of CDS Ventures, LLC SUMMARY • Issues of domestic violence are common in addictions treatment • Care must be given in helping the batterer and survivor integrate their experiences into their treatment • Both survivor and batterer need to clarify their part/responsibility in the situation • Many batterers are also survivors and must be helped to cope with both sets of issues • Child abuse is common in instances of domestic violence and must be screened for • Domestic violence assessment and counseling require specialized skills and training • Effective treatment for domestic violence requires a multidisciplinary holistic approach to be effective.