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Models of treatment for co occurring disorders 3
 

Models of treatment for co occurring disorders 3

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This course provides training and CEUs for addicitons counselors and LPCs working in Addictions, Mental Health and Co-Occurring Disorders will help counselors, social workers, marriage and family ...

This course provides training and CEUs for addicitons counselors and LPCs working in Addictions, Mental Health and Co-Occurring Disorders will help counselors, social workers, marriage and family therapists, alcohol and drug counselors and addictions professionals get continuing education and certification training to aid them in providing services guided by best practices. AllCEUs is approved by the california Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors (CAADAC), NAADAC, the Association for Addictions Professionals, the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counseling Board of Georgia (ADACB-GA), the National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) and most states.

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    Models of treatment for co occurring disorders 3 Models of treatment for co occurring disorders 3 Presentation Transcript

    • Models of Treatment for Co-Occurring Disorders 38 Hours
      Instructor: Dr. Dawn-Elise Snipes
      Executive Director, AllCEUs.com
    • Identify the main points of relapse prevention therapy
      Discuss the theory and purpose of step-down services
      Identify ways to establish linkages in the community to facilitate the accessibility of wrap-around services.
      Learner Objectives
    • Main Points
      Recovery and relapse can be described as related processes that unfold in six stages:
      Abstaining from alcohol and other drugs
      Separating from people, places, and things that promote the use of alcohol or drugs
      Establishing a social network that supports recovery
      Stopping self-defeating behaviors that prevent awareness of painful feelings and irrational thoughts
      Learning how to manage feelings and emotions responsibly
      Learning to change addictive thinking patterns that create painful feelings and self-defeating behaviors
      Identifying and changing the mistaken core beliefs about oneself, others, and the world
      Relapse Prevention Therapy
    • Have a mistaken belief that causes irrational thoughts
      Begin to return to addictive thinking patterns that cause painful feelings
      Engage in compulsive, self-defeating behaviors as a way to avoid the feelings
      Seek out situations involving people who use alcohol and drugs
      Find themselves in more pain, thinking less rationally, and behaving less responsibly
      Find themselves in a situation in which drug or alcohol use seems like a logical escape from their pain, and they use alcohol or drugs.
      Signs of Relapse
    • Stabilization
      Detoxification from alcohol and other drugs
      Solving the immediate crises that threaten sobriety
      Learning skills to identify and manage Post Acute Withdrawal and Addictive Preoccupation
      Establishing a daily structure that includes proper diet, exercise, stress management, and regular contact with treatment personnel and self-help groups.
      Principle 1: Self-Regulation
    • Self-Assessment
      Taking a detailed reconstruction of the presenting problems and the alcohol and drug use history.
      Identifying critical issues that can trigger relapse.
      In reconstructing the recovery/relapse history, it is important to identify the recovery tasks that were completed or ignored, and to find the sequence of warning signs that led back to drug or alcohol use.
      Principle 2: Integration
    • Relapse Education
      Learning accurate information about what causes relapse and what can be done to prevent it.
      This information should include, but not be limited to
      A bio/psycho/social model of addictive disease
      Common “stuck points” in recovery
      Complicating factors in relapse
      Warning sign identification
      Relapse warning sign management strategies
      Effective recovery planning
      Principle 3: Understanding
    • Principle 4: Self-Knowledge
      Warning Sign Identification
      Learning to identify the sequence of problems that has led to alcohol and drug use in the past and then recognizing how those steps could cause relapse in the future.
      Developing a personal relapse warning sign list
      (1) reviewing warning signs
      (2) making an initial warning sign list
      (3) analyzing warning signs
      (4) making a final warning sign list.
      The patient develops individualized warning sign list by thinking of
      irrational thoughts
      unmanageable feelings
      self-defeating behaviors.
    • Stabilization
      Detoxification from alcohol and other drugs
      Solving the immediate crises that threaten sobriety
      Learning skills to identify and manage Post Acute Withdrawal and Addictive Preoccupation
      Establishing a daily structure that includes
      proper diet
      Exercise
      stress management
      regular contact with treatment personnel and self-help groups.
      Principle 1: Self-Regulation
    • Self-Assessment
      Taking a detailed reconstruction of the presenting problems and the alcohol and drug use history.
      Identifying critical issues that can trigger relapse.
      In reconstructing the recovery/relapse history
      identify the recovery tasks that were completed or ignored
      find the sequence of warning signs that led back to drug or alcohol use.
      Principle 2: Integration
    • Relapse Education
      Learning accurate information about what causes relapse and what can be done to prevent it.
      This information should include, but not be limited to
      A bio/psycho/social model of addictive disease
      Common “stuck points” in recovery
      Complicating factors in relapse
      Warning sign identification
      Relapse warning sign management strategies
      Effective recovery planning
      Principle 3: Understanding
    • Principle 4: Self-Knowledge
      Warning Sign Identification
      Learning to identify the sequence of problems that has led to alcohol and drug use in the past and how to prevent them in the future
      Developing a personal relapse warning sign list
      (1) reviewing warning signs
      (2) making an initial warning sign list
      (3) analyzing warning signs
      (4) making a final warning sign list.
      The patient develops individualized warning sign list by thinking of
      irrational thoughts
      unmanageable feelings
      self-defeating behaviors.
    • Identify two different types of warning signs
      Those related to core psychological issues (problems from childhood)
      Those related to core addictive issues (problems from the addiction).
      When patterns of addictive thinking that justify relapse are reactivated, a return to using alcohol and drugs occurs.
      Self-Knowledge Cont…
    • Warning Sign Management
      Learning how to manage or cope with their warning signs as they occur.
      Management on three distinct levels.
      #1 is the situational-behavioral level. Patients are taught to avoid situations that trigger warning signs, and how to modify their behavioral responses when needed
      #2 is the cognitive/affective (thoughts and feelings) level, where patients challenge their irrational thoughts and deal with their unmanageable feelings when triggered
      #3 is the core issue level, where patients are taught to identify the core addictive and psychological issues that initially create the warning signs
      Principle 5: Coping Skills
    • Recovery Planning
      Development of a schedule of recovery activities that will help patients recognize and manage warning signs as they develop
      Reviewing each warning sign on the final warning sign list and ensuring that there is a scheduled recovery activity for each.
      Principle 6: Change
    • Inventory Training
      Completing daily inventories to monitor compliance with the recovery program and check for the emergence of relapse warning signs.
      A morning inventory is used to plan the day
      An evening inventory reviews progress and problems that occurred during that day.
      A typical morning inventory asks the patient to identify three primary goals for that day, create a to-do list, then schedule time for completion of each task
      The evening review inventory, the patient should review the to-do list to determine whether he or she completed the required activities and if he or she experienced relapse warning signs.
      Principle 7: Awareness
    • Involvement of Others
      Individuals cannot recover alone.
      Family members, 12-step program sponsors, counselors, and peers are just a few of the many recovery resources available.
      The more psychologically and emotionally healthy the significant others are, the more likely they are to be helpful.
      The more directly the significant others are involved in the relapse prevention planning process, the more likely they are to become engaged in supporting positive efforts and intervening when necessary
      Principle 8: Significant Others
    • Relapse Prevention Plan Updating
      Updated on a monthly basis for the first 3 months, quarterly for the remainder of the first year, twice a year for the next 2 years, annually thereafter
      Nearly two thirds of all relapses occur during the first 6 months of recovery.
      Less than one quarter of the variables that actually cause relapse can be predicted during the initial treatment phase.
      A relapse prevention plan update session involves the following:
      A review of the original assessment, warning sign list, management strategies, and recovery plan.
      An update of the assessment with progress or problems since the previous update.
      Incorporation of new warning signs and management strategies for them
      Elimination of activities that are no longer needed.
      Principle 9: Maintenance
    • Gradual movement from a more intensive level of care helps prevent people’s new coping skills from being overwhelmed.
      Residential care often protects people from the daily stresses of bills, traffic and dysfunctional others.
      Intensive outpatient provides a place to receive support, hope and encouragement on a daily basis
      Outpatient is appropriate once the patient has a reliable, healthy support network outside of therapy
      Theory and Purpose of Step-Down
    • Take an inventory of everything you need each day
      Establish linkages in the community
      • Transportation
      • Electricity
      • Housing
      • Childcare
      • Telephone
      • Education
      • Legal assistance
      • Food
      • Prosocial activities
      • Employment
      • Clothing
      Your consumers probably need the same things.
    • Churches
      Thrift shops
      Workforce development
      Transportation
      United Way Information and Referral
      Department of Children and Families
      12-Step groups
      Resources
    • Relapse prevention therapy involves 9 principles
      Self Regulation
      Integration
      Understanding
      Self-Knowledge
      Coping Skills
      Change
      Awareness
      Significant Others
      Maintenance
      Step-down services are necessary to prevent straining the effectiveness of new coping skills
      Wrap-around services to assist consumers in meeting basic needs and reducing stress are vital
      Summary