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Workplace Writing: Planning, Packaging, and     Perfecting Communication, 1st ed.            Chapters 4, 5 and 6          ...
Workplace Writing: Planning, Packaging, and     Perfecting Communication, 1st ed.      Chapter 4: Planning Workplace      ...
Chapter 4: Planning Workplace Communication This chapter discusses the following:      Understand the P3 process of plann...
Nicole Stefani, Public Relations specialist for ImageSkillNicole drafts press releases, makes promotional  films, plans co...
The P3 Process: An Overview      The P3 process is recursive.      The 3 steps are dynamic and overlap.      Planning, ...
The P3 Communication Process      Planning                         Packaging                      Perfecting    Determine ...
Planning Before writing your document, you should   accomplish the following:  Examine your purposes—are you writing   du...
Planning        Determine your goals—are you writing to               Persuade an audience to accept your point of      ...
Determining Goals (cont.)Workplace Writing, 1st Edition                        © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and ...
Planning      Consider your audience—are you writing to             Specialists?             Semi-specialists?         ...
Planning    Planning is like mapping your route before leaving for a    trip. Know where you’re going before you get there...
Planning      Determine how the content will be provided.      Which of the following communication       channels will ...
Determine how the content will be provided (cont.)      The type of communication channel       determines the size and s...
Meeting Workplace Communication Challenges   Use the end-of-chapter activities to    apply chapter principles individuall...
Workplace Writing: Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting Communication , 1st ed.Chapter 5: Packaging Workplace Writing Throu...
Chapter 5: Packaging Workplace     Writing Through Effective Document                   Design This chapter discusses the ...
Nicole Stefani, Public Relations specialist for ImageSkill Nicole drafts press releases, makes promotional   films, plans ...
Packaging      Organize the draft according to some logical       sequence which your readers can follow easily.       Th...
Talking Headings                                            Sentences Used as Talking HeadsRude Customer Service Leads to ...
Chunking          Chunking involves breaking text into           smaller pieces, smaller chunks.          Try these chun...
Order     Order allows you to prioritize text.     Various techniques help you highlight key      points:            Ty...
AccessReaders can access text more easily if you usesome of the following techniques:         White space                ...
Access (cont.)        Following is an example of windows and         fills:                This is a shadowed window with...
Variety   Add variety to your text through                                      90          Graphics                   8...
Variety (cont.)         Following are examples of portrait,          landscape, and columns:                             ...
Document Design     Here’s a caution:                                 NOTE:     • Do not overuse highlighting techniques....
The Impact of Technology                          Hard copy text (8 ½” x 11”)                                 E-mail scree...
The Impact of Technology (cont.)                                                         The size of this e-              ...
The Impact of Technology (cont.)                                       Boxes within                                       ...
Meeting Workplace Communication Challenges   Use the end-of-chapter activities to    apply chapter principles individuall...
Workplace Writing: Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting Communication, 1st ed.Chapter 6: Perfecting Workplace Writing      ...
Chapter 6: Perfecting Workplace Writing This chapter discusses the following:      Perfect your business documents.     ...
Nicole Stefani, Public Relations specialist for ImageSkill Nicole drafts press releases, makes promotional   films, plans ...
Perfecting      Revise             Add missing details             Delete wordiness             Simplify word usage   ...
Clarity through Addition To achieve clarity, add the following:  Specific Detail  Answer the Reporters’ Questions  Use ...
Clarity—Provide Specific Detail BAD:           Vague word “Put enough air in your tires.”        (How much air is “enough”...
Clarity—Answer Reporter’s Questions  Reporter’s Questions = who, what, when, where, why,    and how  BAD:  “We bought a ne...
Clarity—Answer Reporter’s Questions (cont.)    GOOD:    “The marketing department bought a      new AABco laser printer ($...
Clarity—Use Easily Understandable Words                                                    NOTE:BAD:                      ...
Clarity—Use Easily Understandable Words (cont.) GOOD: “We know you need to send citations   because of code 18-B1 Continui...
Clarity—Use Verbs in the Active Voice vs. the Passive Voice Avoid Passive Voice: “It has been determined    that the machi...
Conciseness To achieve conciseness,  Limit paragraph length  Limit sentence length  Limit word lengthWorkplace Writing,...
Conciseness—Limit Paragraph Length         To write concisely, limit paragraph          length to approximately          ...
Conciseness—Limit Paragraph Length (cont.)BAD   Please prepare to supply a readout of your findings   and recommendations ...
Conciseness—Limit Paragraph Length (cont.)BETTER      Please prepare to supply a readout of      your findings and recomme...
Conciseness—Limit Sentence Length   To write concisely, limit sentence length    to           10-15 words (average)Workp...
Conciseness—Limit Word Length     To write concisely, limit word length to            1-2 syllables (average)           ...
Conciseness—Limiting Word and Sentence Length (cont.)BAD                                                        NOTE: “Dur...
Conciseness—Limiting Word and Sentence Length (cont.)GOOD “In July, I decided to improve my writing by meeting with a teac...
Accuracy             Errors in your writing make you look              unprofessional.             Proofread to catch an...
P3 Process In Action  Planning  Packaging  PerfectingWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition                         © 2010 Pear...
Planning—Journalist’s Questions Planning (Listing)      Who? Matt      What? fixed rate mortgages available      Where?...
Packaging—Rough Draft with Suggested Revisions (boldface)  To:    Matt Wright  From: Greg McLendon  Re:    Fixed Rate Mort...
Perfecting—Corrected Memo   To:     Matt Wright   From: Greg McLendon   Subject: Fixed Rate Mortgage Investments for June ...
Meeting Workplace Communication Challenges   Use the end-of-chapter activities to    apply chapter principles individuall...
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Transcript of "COM300 Chps 4, 5, and 6"

  1. 1. Workplace Writing: Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting Communication, 1st ed. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 Steven M. Gerson Sharon J. Gerson
  2. 2. Workplace Writing: Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting Communication, 1st ed. Chapter 4: Planning Workplace Communication Steven M. Gerson Sharon J. Gerson
  3. 3. Chapter 4: Planning Workplace Communication This chapter discusses the following:  Understand the P3 process of planning, packaging, and perfecting to create effective workplace communication.  Examine your goals by considering audience, determining the channel of communication, and gathering data.  Gather data by answering reporter’s questions, mind mapping, brainstorming and listing, outlining, storyboarding, creating organization charts, or performing research.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 3
  4. 4. Nicole Stefani, Public Relations specialist for ImageSkillNicole drafts press releases, makes promotional films, plans conventions, interacts with members of print and broadcast journalism, and prepares annual reports and proposals. How does Nicole meet her communication challenges?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 4
  5. 5. The P3 Process: An Overview  The P3 process is recursive.  The 3 steps are dynamic and overlap.  Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting help you with your correspondence and enhance your professionalism.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 5
  6. 6. The P3 Communication Process Planning Packaging Perfecting Determine Organize the draft Revise your goals according to some o Add missing details Consider your logical sequence o Delete wordiness audience Format the content to o Simplify word usage Choose the allow for ease of o Enhance the tone of communication access your communication channel Factor in the impact of o Reformat your text for Gather your technology ease of access data o Proofread o Correct errorsWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 6
  7. 7. Planning Before writing your document, you should accomplish the following:  Examine your purposes—are you writing due to  External motivation?  Has someone asked you to write the memo, letter, report, or proposal?  Internal motivation?  Have you decided to write the correspondence based on your own needs?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 7
  8. 8. Planning  Determine your goals—are you writing to  Persuade an audience to accept your point of view?  Instruct an audience by directing actions?  Inform an audience of facts, concerns, or questions you might have?  Build trust and rapport?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 8
  9. 9. Determining Goals (cont.)Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 9
  10. 10. Planning  Consider your audience—are you writing to  Specialists?  Semi-specialists?  Lay readers?  Multiple readers with varied levels of knowledge? Ch. 3 discusses audience in detail.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 10
  11. 11. Planning Planning is like mapping your route before leaving for a trip. Know where you’re going before you get there.  Gather your data—use any of the following techniques:  answering the reporters questions  mind mapping  brainstorming/listing  flowcharting  outlining  storyboarding  org charts  researching (online and/or library)Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 11
  12. 12. Planning  Determine how the content will be provided.  Which of the following communication channels will you use?  Reports  E-mail  Brochures  Oral presenations  Blogs  Instant  Web sites Messages  PowerPoint  Letters  MemosWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 12
  13. 13. Determine how the content will be provided (cont.)  The type of communication channel determines the size and shape of the content.  The communication channel determines the technological requirements of your writer and reader(s).Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 13
  14. 14. Meeting Workplace Communication Challenges Use the end-of-chapter activities to apply chapter principles individually and in groups.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 14
  15. 15. Workplace Writing: Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting Communication , 1st ed.Chapter 5: Packaging Workplace Writing Through Effective Document Design Steven M. Gerson Sharon J. Gerson
  16. 16. Chapter 5: Packaging Workplace Writing Through Effective Document Design This chapter discusses the following:  Package your communication.  Organize your content through analysis, spatial, chronology, importance, comparison/contrast, problem/solution, and cause/effect.  Consider page layout (the document’s design) to help you communicate more effectively.  Understand the impact of technology on workplace communication.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 16
  17. 17. Nicole Stefani, Public Relations specialist for ImageSkill Nicole drafts press releases, makes promotional films, plans conventions, interacts with members of print and broadcast journalism, and prepares annual reports and proposals. How does Nicole design and package her communication?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 17
  18. 18. Packaging  Organize the draft according to some logical sequence which your readers can follow easily. These include  Chronology—good for instructions  Spatial—good for descriptions  Importance—good for reports and memos  Problem/Solution--good for proposals  Comparison/Contrast--good for showing alternativesWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 18
  19. 19. Talking Headings Sentences Used as Talking HeadsRude Customer Service Leads to Sales LossesAccounting Department Requests Feedback on Benefits PackageCorporate Profit Sharing Decreases to 27 PercentParking Lot Congestion Angers Employees Phrases Used as Talking HeadsBudget Increases Frozen until 2009Outsourced Workers Leading to Corporate LayoffsHarlan Cisneros—New Departmental SupervisorEEOC: Questions about Company Hiring Practices Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 19
  20. 20. Chunking  Chunking involves breaking text into smaller pieces, smaller chunks.  Try these chunking techniques:  Section dividers and tabs  Headings  White space  Rules (horizontal lines)Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 20
  21. 21. Order Order allows you to prioritize text. Various techniques help you highlight key points:  Typeface—Sans Serif fonts are good for headings.  Type size—a larger font prioritizes key ideas.  Density-boldfacing text emphasizes an idea.  Spacing—adding space after a heading makes it stand out.  Position—centering or outdenting a heading makes it emphatic.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 21
  22. 22. AccessReaders can access text more easily if you usesome of the following techniques: White space  Italics Bullets  Windowing1. Numbering  Fills Boldface  Color ALL CAPS  Inverse type Underlining  Font typeWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 22
  23. 23. Access (cont.)  Following is an example of windows and fills: This is a shadowed window with a color fill. This is a shadowed window with a two-color fill effect.  Following is an example of inverse type: This is inverse type (white type on a black background).Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 23
  24. 24. Variety Add variety to your text through 90  Graphics 80 70 (discussed in Ch. 8) 60 50 East 40 West 30 North 20 10 0 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr  Landscape vs. Portrait orientation  Two or more columns of printWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 24
  25. 25. Variety (cont.)  Following are examples of portrait, landscape, and columns: Landscape (11 x 8 ½) Portrait (8 ½ x 11) Two columnsWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 25
  26. 26. Document Design Here’s a caution: NOTE: • Do not overuse highlighting techniques. • A little highlighting goes a long way. Less is best. • Limit yourself to 3 or so highlighting techniques per page.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 26
  27. 27. The Impact of Technology Hard copy text (8 ½” x 11”) E-mail screen (about 6” x 4”) Handheld PDA screen (about 2” x 2”) Cell phone screen (about 2” x 1”)Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 27
  28. 28. The Impact of Technology (cont.) The size of this e- mail box limits the size of your correspondence.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 28
  29. 29. The Impact of Technology (cont.) Boxes within boxes within boxesWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 29
  30. 30. Meeting Workplace Communication Challenges Use the end-of-chapter activities to apply chapter principles individually and in groups.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 30
  31. 31. Workplace Writing: Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting Communication, 1st ed.Chapter 6: Perfecting Workplace Writing Steven M. Gerson Sharon J. Gerson
  32. 32. Chapter 6: Perfecting Workplace Writing This chapter discusses the following:  Perfect your business documents.  Use the reporter’s questions and focus on specificity of detail to add missing material from your text.  Delete dead words and phrases for conciseness and to enhance readability.  Simplify words for conciseness and easier understanding.  Move information for emphasis.  Reformat paragraphs and use highlighting techniques for ease of access.  Create a pleasant tone to ensure effective workplace writing.  Proofread and correct for accuracy.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 32
  33. 33. Nicole Stefani, Public Relations specialist for ImageSkill Nicole drafts press releases, makes promotional films, plans conventions, interacts with members of print and broadcast journalism, and prepares annual reports and proposals. How does Nicole perfect her communication?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 33
  34. 34. Perfecting  Revise  Add missing details  Delete wordiness  Simplify word usage  Enhance the tone of your communication  Reformat your text for ease of access  Practice the speech or review the text  Proofread  Correct errorsWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 34
  35. 35. Clarity through Addition To achieve clarity, add the following:  Specific Detail  Answer the Reporters’ Questions  Use Easily Understandable Words  Use Verbs in the Active Voice Versus the Passive VoiceWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 35
  36. 36. Clarity—Provide Specific Detail BAD: Vague word “Put enough air in your tires.” (How much air is “enough”?) GOOD: “Fill your tires to 32 pounds per square inch.” Specific detailWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 36
  37. 37. Clarity—Answer Reporter’s Questions Reporter’s Questions = who, what, when, where, why, and how BAD: “We bought a new machine to solve the problem.”  Who is “we”?  What is the “new machine”?  When was the purchase made?  Where was the machine located?  Why was the purchase made—what was the problem?  How much did the machine cost?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 37
  38. 38. Clarity—Answer Reporter’s Questions (cont.) GOOD: “The marketing department bought a new AABco laser printer ($595) on June 10 for our production room. This printer will produce double- side, color copies unlike our prior printer. ”Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 38
  39. 39. Clarity—Use Easily Understandable Words NOTE:BAD: Write to express, not to impress!“We are cognizant of your Use words that need for issuance of are easy to citations pursuant to code understand. 18-B1 CPR violations.” Define abbreviations like “CPR.” Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 39
  40. 40. Clarity—Use Easily Understandable Words (cont.) GOOD: “We know you need to send citations because of code 18-B1 Continuing Property Record violations. ”Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 40
  41. 41. Clarity—Use Verbs in the Active Voice vs. the Passive Voice Avoid Passive Voice: “It has been determined that the machine was NOTE: broken by John.” Active voice Use Active Voice: sentences are less wordy and more “John broke the direct than machine.” passive voice constructions.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 41
  42. 42. Conciseness To achieve conciseness,  Limit paragraph length  Limit sentence length  Limit word lengthWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 42
  43. 43. Conciseness—Limit Paragraph Length  To write concisely, limit paragraph length to approximately  4-6 lines of text  50 words per paragraphWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 43
  44. 44. Conciseness—Limit Paragraph Length (cont.)BAD Please prepare to supply a readout of your findings and recommendations to the officer of the Southwest Group at the completion of your study NOTE: period. As we discussed, the undertaking of this project implies no currently known incidences of Long impropriety in the Southwest Group, nor is it paragraphs designed to find any. Rather, it is to assure are hard to ourselves of sufficient caution, control, and impartiality when dealing with an area laden with read. such potential vulnerability. I am confident that we will be better served as a company as a result of this effort.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 44
  45. 45. Conciseness—Limit Paragraph Length (cont.)BETTER Please prepare to supply a readout of your findings and recommendations to the officer of the Southwest Group at the NOTE: completion of your study period. Shorter paragraphs are easier to read. As we discussed, the undertaking of this Spacing gives readers project implies no currently known a chance to stop, incidences of impropriety in the breathe, and digest Southwest Group, nor is it designed to the information. find any. Rather, it is to assure ourselves of sufficient caution, control, and These paragraphs are impartiality when dealing with an area still hard to read, due laden with such potential vulnerability. to the sentence and word length. I am confident that we will be better served as a company as a result of this effort.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 45
  46. 46. Conciseness—Limit Sentence Length To write concisely, limit sentence length to  10-15 words (average)Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 46
  47. 47. Conciseness—Limit Word Length To write concisely, limit word length to  1-2 syllables (average) NOTE: All words cannot be 1-2 syllables! You cannot shorten words like “telecommunications,” “engineer,” “accountant,” or “trinitrolulene” (TNT). Change the words you can; leave other words alone.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 47
  48. 48. Conciseness—Limiting Word and Sentence Length (cont.)BAD NOTE: “During the month of July, I This sentence is 23 words long, and it uses made a decision to five words over two positively impact my syllables (underlined). writing inabilities by having a meeting with an instructional advisor.”Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 48
  49. 49. Conciseness—Limiting Word and Sentence Length (cont.)GOOD “In July, I decided to improve my writing by meeting with a teacher.” NOTE: This sentence is 13 words long, and it uses one word over two syllables (underlined).Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 49
  50. 50. Accuracy  Errors in your writing make you look unprofessional.  Proofread to catch and correct errors.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 50
  51. 51. P3 Process In Action  Planning  Packaging  PerfectingWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 51
  52. 52. Planning—Journalist’s Questions Planning (Listing)  Who? Matt  What? fixed rate mortgages available  Where? Mortgage bank  When? current quarter  Why? to show availability in the fixed rate market  How? to compare three fixed rate mortgage investments to determine profitabilityWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 52
  53. 53. Packaging—Rough Draft with Suggested Revisions (boldface) To: Matt Wright From: Greg McLendon Re: Fixed Rate Mortgage [what about them?] Date: May 29, 2009 In an effort To review the mortgage market during this quarter, I have started by looking at fixed rate. I ran three fixed rate mortgage investments through the PALMS model[,] and Joel downloaded the market shares into a spreadsheet [what’s “PALMS”?]. The results are in the two attachments to this memo. Attachment #1 has all three of the mortgage investments funded by what Joel selected. Attachment #2 shows what I picked in mortgage investments (only two bonds- the highest returns) and what I picked to fund them. [why repeat the two attachments here and below? Combine them in the body points.] Attachment #1 show [subject-verb agreement error] that the spread is barely over 5 bps [define “bps”] in the base case. It [vague pronoun reference] also shows the longer duration and more convexity on liabilities then [spelling = “than”] assets. [boldface the headings for greater access] Attachment #2 shows that the spread is about 27 bps in the base with the liability duration still longer than assets, but the liability convexity about half the assets.[29 words] To add spread, as attachment #1 and #2 show [subject-verb agreement error], some convexity risk would need to be added to the portfolio. My intent was to show you [passive voice] what was available in the fixed rate mortgage market. The three mortgages I reviewed were plain sequentials, but they do represent the fixed rate mortgage investment market. I can conclude that [wordy] the fixed rate mortgage market is still very tight making it difficult for the Bank to invest in and make a spread.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 53
  54. 54. Perfecting—Corrected Memo To: Matt Wright From: Greg McLendon Subject: Fixed Rate Mortgage Investments for June 2009 Date: May 29, 2009 To review the mortgage market, I have started by looking at fixed rate. I ran three fixed rate mortgage investments through the PALMS financial calculator model. Joel downloaded this spreadsheet for your information. The results are in the two attachments to this memo. Attachment #1 has all three of the mortgage investments funded by what Joel selected in COs. The spread is barely over 5 bps (basis points which equal one one-hundredth of a percentage point in the base case). The attachment also shows the longer duration and more convexity on liabilities than assets. Attachment #2 shows what I picked in mortgage investments (only two bonds- the highest returns) and what I picked to fund them. The spread is about 27 bps in the base with the liability duration still longer than assets. The liability convexity equals about half the assets. To add spread, as attachment #1 and #2 shows, some convexity risk would need to be added to the portfolio. In this memo, I have shown what was available in the fixed rate mortgage market. The three mortgages I reviewed were plain sequentials, but they do represent the fixed rate mortgage investment market. I conclude that the fixed rate mortgage market is still very tight making it difficult for the Bank to invest in and make a spread.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 54
  55. 55. Meeting Workplace Communication Challenges Use the end-of-chapter activities to apply chapter principles individually and in groups.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 55
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