Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
COM 300 Chps 17 and 18
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

COM 300 Chps 17 and 18

362

Published on

PRivate: For COM 300 CSU-GC course, additional resources

PRivate: For COM 300 CSU-GC course, additional resources

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
362
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  1. Workplace Writing:Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting Communication, 1st ed. Chapters 17 and 18 Steven M. Gerson Sharon J. Gerson
  2. Workplace Writing:Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting Communication, 1st ed.Chapter 17: Short, Informal Reports Steven M. Gerson Sharon J. Gerson
  3. Chapter 17: Short, Informal Reports This chapter discusses the following:  Objectives  Report Channels  Criteria for Writing Short, Informal Reports  Types of ReportsWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 3
  4. Linda M. Freeman, CPA, Marks, Nelson, Vohland & Campbell Linda M. Freeman and her colleagues spend approximately 20 to 25 percent of their day on report writing, including background research time, drafting, and proofreading. On a daily basis, Ms. Freeman and her colleagues write  Compilation Reports How does Linda  Review Reports meet her  Audit Reports communication  Valuation Reports challenges?  Private Letter Ruling Requests These reports are “subject to guidelines of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.”Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 4
  5. ObjectivesReports allow you to Supply a record of work accomplished Record and clarify complex information Present information to a large number of readers Record problems encountered Document schedules, timetables, deadlines, and milestones Recommend future action Document current status Record proceduresWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 5
  6. Report Channels Reports can be written in any of the following formats:  Memo reports  E-mail reports  Letter reportsWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 6
  7. Criteria for Writing Reports All reports contain similar elements, including  Organization  Development  StyleWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 7
  8. Criteria for Writing Reports (cont.)  Organization—to organize your report, include an  Heading  Introduction  Discussion  Conclusion/RecommendationWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 8
  9. Criteria for Writing Reports (cont.) Organization (cont.)  Heading—like a memo, include  Date (on which the report was written)  To (your audience)  From (your name)  Subject (the topic about which you are writing and a focus) Focus Topic Subject: Progress Report on the XYZ ProjectWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 9
  10. Criteria for Writing Reports (cont.)  Organization (cont.)  Introduction  Purpose—why you are writing and what you are writing about  Personnel—others involved in the project (optional)  Dates—time period covered (optional)Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 10
  11. Criteria for Writing Reports (cont.)  Organization (cont.)  Discussion  Develop your points  Use headings and subheadings  Include graphics for visual appeal, conciseness, and clarityWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 11
  12. Criteria for Writing Reports (cont.)  Organization (cont.)  Conclusion  Sum up what you have learned, what of importance has occurred, or what decisions have been made.  Recommendations  Suggest what the next course of action should be.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 12
  13. Criteria for Writing Reports (cont.)  Development  Answer reporter’s questions.  Who is involved in the project?  What are the steps in the procedure; what decisions have you made; what facts have you discovered?  When did the activities occur?  Where did the events occur?  Why are you writing—what motivated the report?  How did the occurrence take place (for an incident report, for example)?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 13
  14. Criteria for Writing Reports (cont.)  Style  Clarity  Conciseness  Graphic aids (tables and figures) for document designWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 14
  15. Types of Reports  Trip Reports  Progress Reports  Feasibility Reports (Recommendation Reports)  Incident Reports  Investigative Reports  Meeting MinutesWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 15
  16. Trip Reports  Introduction  Objectives  Why are you working on the project?  What problems motivated the project?  What do you hope to achieve?  Who initiated the project?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 16
  17. Trip Reports (cont.)  Introduction (cont.)  Personnel  With whom are your working (team members, other associated, customers)?  Previous activity (if this is one of several reports in a series)  What has happened up to this point?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 17
  18. Trip Reports (cont.)  Discussion (Findings, Agenda)  Work accomplished  Problems encountered NOTE: Consider  Conclusion including graphics  What has been achieved to document your report visually. up to this point?  What is the projected completion date?  Recommendation  What do you suggest should happen next?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 18
  19. Progress Report  Introduction  Objectives  Why are you writing the report?  What is the topic of your report?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 19
  20. Progress Report (cont.)  Discussion  What work have you accomplished?  What problems did you encounter?  What work is remaining? NOTE: Consider including graphics to document your report visually—pie charts, bar charts, and Gantt charts work well with progress reports.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 20
  21. Progress Report (cont.)  Conclusion/Recommendation  Provide an overview of the project’s status.  Suggest what’s next.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 21
  22. Feasibility (Recommendation) Report  Introduction  Objectives/Personnel  What is the goal of this report?  What problem motivated the study?  Who initiated the report?  Who else is involved in the study?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 22
  23. Feasibility (Recommendation) Report (cont.) Discussion (Findings)  Criteria—what will be the basis for your recommendation (cost, time, personnel, options, delivery methods, etc.)?  Analysis—report on your findings, comparing them to your criteria. NOTE: A table or bar chart will help readers visualize your discussion.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 23
  24. Feasibility (Recommendation) Report (cont.)  Conclusion  Draw a conclusion, based on your findings.  Recommendations  What is the most feasible next course of action?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 24
  25. Incident Report Introduction  Discussion  Purpose (Findings, Work  What incident Accomplished) occurred?  What problems did  When did it occur? you find?  Who and what was  What actions did involved? you take to correct the problem?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 25
  26. Incident Report (cont.)  Conclusion  What caused the problems?  What was the result of the problems (damage, cost, etc.)?  Recommendations  What should be done to avoid future problems?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 26
  27. Investigative Reports  Introduction (overview, background)  Purpose: What incident are you reporting on, and what do you hope to achieve in this investigation?  Location: Where did the incident occur?  Personnel: Who was involved in the incident?  Who worked with you?  Who was involved in the situation?  Authorization: Who recommended or suggested that you investigate the problem?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 27
  28. Investigative Reports (cont.)  Discussion (Findings)  Observations, including physical evidence, descriptions, lab reports, testimony, and interview responses.  Contacts—people interviewed  Difficulties encountered  Techniques, equipment, and/or tools used in the course of the investigation  Test procedures followedWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 28
  29. Investigative Reports (cont.)  Conclusion  What discoveries have you made regarding the causes behind the incident?  Who or what is at fault?  Recommendations.  What do you suggest next?  Changes in personnel?  Changes in approach or methodology?  New training or technology? What is the preferred follow- up for the patient or client?  How can the problem be fixed?Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 29
  30. Meeting Minutes  Introduction  Date/Time/Place of the meeting  Attendees—List names of those who attended the meeting.  Approval of last meetings minutesWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 30
  31. Meeting Minutes (cont.)  Discussion (Findings, Agenda)  Report on  decisions made  conclusions arrived at  issues confronted  opposing points of view  votes takenWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 31
  32. Meeting Minutes (cont.)  Conclusion  Old Business—old topics still unresolved and needing further discussion.  New Business—new topics to be covered in future meetings.  Next Meeting—when the committee will meet next, providing the date, time, and location.  Time of Adjournment—when the meeting ended.  Signature—sign your name beneath the typed signature (unless the minutes will be submitted electronically).Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 32
  33. Meeting Workplace Communication Challenges  Use the end-of-chapter activities to apply chapter principles individually and in groups.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 33
  34. Workplace Writing:Planning, Packaging, and Perfecting Communication, 1st ed.Chapter 18: Long, Formal Research Reports Steven M. Gerson Sharon J. Gerson
  35. Chapter 18: Long, Formal Research Reports This chapter discusses the following:  Objectives  Types of Long, Formal Reports: Informative, Analytical, and Recommendation  Major Components of Long, Formal Reports  Using Research in Long, Formal ReportsWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 35
  36. Charles Worth, Assistant City Manager/City Clerk of Round Rock, AL Charles says that his city’s engineers, police officers, fire chiefs, financial How does Charles advisors, and parks and meet his recreation employees often communication write formal reports to city’s challenges? council members and the city’s mayor. These long reports help the city council members “make informed decisions” that impact the city’s residents and business owners.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 36
  37. Objectives Write a long, formal report requiring research when  a subject is important  documentation will reveal the importance of the topic  large sums of money are involved  large numbers of people are affected  time and resources are devoted to development of the report  research will explain and support the topicWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 37
  38. Informative, Analytical, and Recommendation Reports Informative Reports: Provide information to your audience by focusing on the facts. These facts will help your readers better understand the situation, the context, or the status of the topic.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 38
  39. Informative, Analytical, and Recommendation Reports (cont.) Analytical Reports: Analyze for your audience by beginning with factual information. Then, you expand on this information by interpreting it and drawing conclusions.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 39
  40. Informative, Analytical, and Recommendation Reports (cont.) Recommendation Reports: Recommend action as a follow-up to your findings. Tell the audience why they should purchase a product, use a service, choose a vendor, select a software package, or follow a course of action.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 40
  41. Major Components of Long, Formal Reports  Front matter (title page, cover letter, a table of contents, list of illustrations, and an abstract or executive summary)  Text (introduction including purpose, issues, background, and problems; discussion; and conclusion/recommendation)  Back matter (glossary, works cited or references page, and an optional appendix)Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 41
  42. Major Components of Long, Formal Reports (cont.)Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 42
  43. Using Research in Long, Formal Reports Use research in your long, formal report to  create content  support commentary and content with details  prove points  emphasize the importance of an idea  enhance the reliability of an opinion  show the importance of a subject to the larger business community  address the audience’s need for documentation and substantiationWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 43
  44. Primary and Secondary Sources  Primary: research performed or generated by you, including  preparing a survey or a questionnaire targeting a group of respondents  networking to discover information from other individuals  visiting job sites  performing lab experimentsWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 44
  45. Primary and Secondary Sources (cont.)  Secondary: online, printed, and published information taken from sources including  Books  Periodicals  Newspapers  Encyclopedias  Reports  Proposals  Web sites  BlogsWorkplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 45
  46. Meeting Workplace Communication Challenges  Use the end-of-chapter activities to apply chapter principles individually and in groups.Workplace Writing, 1st Edition © 2010 Pearson Higher Education,Gerson and Gerson Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 46

×