Collaborative teaching workshop by dr manishankar chakraborty and mr salim bani oraba (1)

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Collaborative teaching workshop by dr manishankar chakraborty and mr salim bani oraba (1)

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Collaborative teaching workshop by dr manishankar chakraborty and mr salim bani oraba (1)

  1. 1. Mr. Salim Bani Orabah & Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty Ibra College of Technology Sultanate of Oman
  2. 2. Outline  Rationale  Outcome  Introspection on Professional Development  Teacher’s Professional Development-Definition  Myth about Professional Development  Tools for Professional Development  Task- Brainstorming on Team/Collaborative Teachings  Case Analysis  Pre-requisite  Activity  Proposed Roadmap  Conclusion  References 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 2
  3. 3. Definition  “A style of pedagogy in which teachers collaborate with one another in planning instruction, may team-teach with one another, and often collaborate with students in setting instructional goals and designing instructional activities”. (Highered Mcgraw-Hill) 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 3
  4. 4. Rationale  Teaching forms the backbone in the teaching-learning domain. Individual teaching is a norm, however, team teaching although an exception has tremendous benefits for the teacher-learner duo. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 4
  5. 5. Outcome  To raise the awareness of the importance of team/collaborative teaching as a tool for Professional Development.  To formulate the process for carrying out team/collaborative teaching.  To be able to carry out team/collaborative teaching sessions within and between departments. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 5
  6. 6. Introspection on Professional Development A Task- Write your own definition of professional development, brainstorm it with the other members of your group and zero into the final one. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 6
  7. 7. Teacher’s Professional Development  “Teacher development…draws on the teacher’s own inner resource for change. It is centred on personal awareness of the possibilities for change, and of what influences the change process. It builds on the past, because recognizing how past experiences have or have not been developmental helps identify opportunities for change in the present and future. It also draws on the present, in encouraging a fuller awareness of the kind of teacher you are now and of other people’s responses to you. It is a self-reflective process, because it is through questioning old habits that alternative ways of being and doing are able to emerge.”  Head, K. and Taylor, P. (1997) Readings in Teacher Development Oxford: Macmillan Heinemann (p1) 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 7
  8. 8. Myth about Professional Development  It is institute driven.  Administrators responsibility only.  No need of self motivation.  Only attending workshops without takeaways. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 8
  9. 9. Tools for Professional Development Activity – Matching Exercise of Development Tools with the Descriptions. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 9
  10. 10. Task- Brainstorming on Team/Collaborative Teachings  Discuss in group if you had or had not have any experiences of team/collaborative teaching in the past.  It should include the-  The Opportunities  The Challenges  The Benefits for Teachers  The Benefits for the students  Would you recommend or not? 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 10
  11. 11. Case Analysis  Introduction (1)Equal Partnership for both (2)Building dynamic teams to experiment (3)Can be conducted in any context (4)Wonderful to disastrous consequences 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 11
  12. 12. Case Analysis  Literature review & Analysis  Lower Teacher-Student ratio  Only sharing turns by teachers not the goal  Teacher develops professionally  Gets a partner to set goals, make plans, implement lessons and evaluate results  Inspiration and constructive feedback  Increased quality by students 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 12
  13. 13. Case Analysis  Nervousness due to lack of awareness  Teachers refuse because they think they are “Solitary Creature”  Teachers refuse to get evaluated by other colleagues  Successful teams should not feel upstaged by peers  Lack of prior experience act as a mental barrier 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 13
  14. 14. Case Analysis  In the Classroom  Never take anything for granted, explicitly discuss everything  Clear Communication  Overcoming challenges of cultural and experiential differences 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 14
  15. 15. Case Analysis  Understanding each others teaching philosophy  Honest discussion to share responsibilities equally  Personal Differences should not lead to loss of respect for each other  Students and pick and exploit such instances 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 15
  16. 16. Case Analysis  Planning  Analyzing individual strengths and abilities.  Complementing each others strengths and abilities.  Both partners taking active roles in various areas-assessments, delivery and feedback 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 16
  17. 17. Case Analysis  Eye Contact and Signaling a must between teachers for classroom management  Transition timing and pacing  Circulating in the classroom  Increasing Teachers proximity to students by making 180 degree angle 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 17
  18. 18. Models of Collaborative Teaching  (1)Traditional Team Teaching- Traditional team teaching involves two or more instructors teaching the same course. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 18
  19. 19. Advantages -Traditional Team Teaching  Includes potential deep student learning because of exposure to the connections across the disciplines of the instructors, the ambiguity of different disciplinary views, and the broad support that a heterogeneous teaching team can provide during the entire course. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 19
  20. 20. Challenges-Traditional Team Teaching  Includes the misfortunes that could occur if the team is not well organized and connected. One challenge is determining the amount of credit each of the team members receives for teaching the course. Sometimes an instructor receives only a fraction of the credit that he or she would receive for teaching a course solo, while in reality team teaching usually requires each instructor to engage more work than when being the only instructor. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 20
  21. 21. Models of Collaborative Teaching  (2) The linked course approach-  Involves cohorts of few students taking two or three courses linked by a theme.  For example, the theme could be “the environment” with the 3 courses being introductory biology, political science, and English.  Once each week the instructors of these linked courses provide a one-hour seminar for the cohort in which the instructors jointly discuss connections, similarities, and differences between the content and objectives of the courses. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 21
  22. 22. Advantages-Linked Course Approach  Based on the research on student learning communities fostered by linked courses, include increased student retention—particularly for students academically at risk; faster and less disruptive student cognitive intellectual development; and greater civic contributions to the institution. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 22
  23. 23. Challenges-Linked Course Approach  Includes finding students for the cohort and aligning the student schedules (this is usually undertaken by the student affairs division and the registrar).  Another challenge is sometimes the cliquish behavior when the student cohort is embedded in a larger class. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 23
  24. 24. Models of Collaborative Teaching  (3) Connected Courses-Courses arranged and connected by the instructors to meet at the same scheduled time so that the classes can meet as a whole when the instructors think it is appropriate. The instructors can illustrate and emphasize the interdisciplinarity of certain topics or approaches appearing in both courses. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 24
  25. 25. Advantages-Connected Course Approach  Includes the student encounters with different disciplinary connections and related ambiguity.  This model is easier to set up than the student learning community linked course model because there is no cohort to form. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 25
  26. 26. Challenges-Connected Course Approach  Includes finding a space for the joint class meetings. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 26
  27. 27. Pre-requisite for Collaborative Teaching  Cultivating Colleagueship  Finding (or cultivating) a good fit in personality, expertise, and pedagogical philosophy is important to functioning as an effective instructional connection.  Strong mismatches in these areas could pose serious obstacles or, on the other hand, provide a variety of learning experiences and opportunities for students. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 27
  28. 28. Pre-requisite of Team Teaching The following questions may be useful as you consider any type of collaborative teaching with a colleague: (1)Do we share a mutual respect for one another? (2)Are we free to disagree respectfully without putting our careers in jeopardy? (3)Are our areas of expertise more likely to complement each other or compete for dominance in the course? (4)Are we both willing to compromise on issues around which we are used to having a high degree of autonomy (eg. grading standards, course content, and classroom management in the case of team teaching)? (These are not of such concern for linked courses.) 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 28
  29. 29. Pre-requisite-Constructing Team- Taught, Linked, or Connected Courses  Goals of the collaborators are important.  Only complementing is not sufficient.  Proper course design especially in team-taught, linked, or connected courses is a must.  Reaching a consensus, linked or co-instructors dramatically improve their chances of offering compelling, coherent courses. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 29
  30. 30. Pre-requisite-Constructing Team- Taught, Linked, or Connected Courses Serial or parallel teaching splits time between two fundamentally different approaches that can leave students confused; moreover, it fails to take advantage of the opportunity for instructors to build community and model rigorous, courteous academic discourse. Linked or co-instructors who improvise policies or assignments independently create an environment that promotes triangulation (students playing one instructor against the other) and inconsistency. If there is a power imbalance involved among the instructors that is not addressed such as between senior and junior faculty, students will recognize the inequality and their learning from one of the instructors may be compromised. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 30
  31. 31. Feasibility & Viability at ICT? (Activity)  Make groups of five lecturers from various departments to identify the courses suitable for-  (a) Linked course approach  (b) Connected course approach  (c) Prepare a plan of action (steps)for effective implementation 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 31
  32. 32. A Proposed Roadmap  Within Department  (1)Cluster courses with commonalities  (2)Seek volunteers(lecturers/facilitators)  (3)Finalize contents & assessments in line with Ministry outcomes and graduate attributes  (4)Staff training on synergistic, symbiotic collaboration techniques  (5)Identification of core competencies of each staff member  (6)Allocate portions  (7)Standardization of delivery techniques 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 32
  33. 33. A Proposed Roadmap  (8)Finalization of time-table with solo/duet lecture depending upon the needs  (9)E-Learning tools like MOODLE can be used proactively as a tool for facilitation and continuous learning  (9)Seek learner feedback on understanding and retention of delivered concepts  (10)Incorporate changes and evolve 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 33
  34. 34. A Proposed Roadmap  Between Departments  (1)Identify courses where departments can collaborate  (2)Identify the major areas/concepts/outcomes within a course that calls for collaboration  (3)Discuss within a committee comprising of academic administrators and lecturers the viability/feasibility aspect  (4)Finalize clearly the deliverables/outcomes to be attained after the exercise 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 34
  35. 35. A Proposed Roadmap  (5)Finalize contents and delivery techniques, itinerary, assessments  (6)E-Learning tools like MOODLE can be used proactively as a tool for facilitation and continuous learning  (7)Seek learner feedback on understanding and retention of delivered concepts  (8) Incorporate changes and evolve 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 35
  36. 36. Conclusion  For successful Team/Collaborative Teaching Should plan together, teach together and after the lesson reflect on the lesson together. 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 36
  37. 37. References  Anonynomous . (2011). Definition of Collaborative teaching. Available: http://highered.mcgraw- hill.com/sites/0072486694/student_view0/glossary.html. Last accessed 16th of April 2014.  Vanderbilt University. (2011). Center for Teaching. Available: http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/teamcollaborative- teaching/. Last accessed 16th of April 2014.  10.5465/AMJ.2007.28165912 ACAD MANAGE J December 1, 2007 vol. 50 no. 6 1323-1333  doi: 10.1177/0022487192043003005 Journal of Teacher Education May 1992 vol. 43 no. 3 193-199  R, Benoit, Team Teaching tips for Foreign Language Teachers, ITESLJ, pp1-9 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 37
  38. 38. Collaborate we grow, individually we stagnate! Thank-you 4/20/2014 Mr. Salim Bani Orabah and Dr. Manishankar Chakraborty 38

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