Jr veins anatomy and physiology
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Jr veins anatomy and physiology

on

  • 1,623 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,623
Views on SlideShare
1,620
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
21
Comments
0

1 Embed 3

http://threadcontent.next.ecollege.com 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Jr veins anatomy and physiology Jr veins anatomy and physiology Presentation Transcript

  • Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology Illustration by Linda S. Nye Anatomy and Pathophysiology
  • Anatomy and physiology of the venous system in the lower extremity
    • Deep venous system: the channel through which 90% of venous blood is pumped out of the legs
    • Superficial venous system: the collecting system of veins
    • Perforating veins: the conduits for blood to travel from the superficial to the deep veins
    • Musculovenous pump: Contraction of foot and leg muscles pumps the blood through one-way valves up and out of the legs
    Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology
  • Superficial venous system
    • Great saphenous vein
    • -runs from dorsum of foot medially up leg
    • -site of highest pressure usually the saphenofemoral junction, but may begin with perforating or pelvic vein
    Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology Illustration by Linda S. Nye
  • Superficial venous system
    • Small saphenous vein
    • - runs from lateral foot up posterior calf
    • -variations in termination
    • -segmental abnormalities
    • -site of highest pressure frequently the saphenopopliteal junction, but may begin with an inter-saphenous connection or perforating vein
    Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology Illustration by Linda S. Nye
  • Perforating veins
    • Mid-thigh Perforating Vein
    • Dodd
    • Proximal Calf Perforator
    • Cockett
    • Gastrocnemius
    • Lateral thigh (lateral subdermic plexus)
    Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology Illustration by Linda S. Nye
  • Musculovenous pump
    • Foot and calf muscles act to squeeze the blood out of the deep veins
    • One way valves allow only upward and inward flow
    • During muscle relaxation, blood is drawn inward through perforating veins
    • Superficial veins act as collecting chamber
    Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology Illustration by Linda S. Nye
  • Venous Valvular Function
    • Valve leaflets allow unidirectional flow, upward or inward
    • Dilation of vein wall prevents opposition of valve leaflets, resulting in reflux
    • Valvular fibrosis, destruction, or agenesis results in reflux
    Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology
  • Doppler exam: Normal flow Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology Illustration by Linda S. Nye
  • Doppler: Reflux Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology Illustration by Linda S. Nye
  • REFLUX : its contribution to varicose veins Copyright © 2009 by American College of Phlebology Illustration by Linda S. Nye