Does Anyone Really Care

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This workshop was facilitated by Dr. Glenda Clare. As a result of attending this workshop participants were be able to: …

This workshop was facilitated by Dr. Glenda Clare. As a result of attending this workshop participants were be able to:
List factors resulting in foster care placement
Identify factors which place foster care youth at high risk for HIV
Identify strategies to provide HIV prevention and treatment services to youth in foster care
Identify resources for future work with youth in foster care

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  • In 2000, 1 in 4 children (19 million) were exposed to family alcoholism or alcohol abuse
    In 2001 about 6.1 million children lived with parents who abused alcohol and other drugs.
    7 of 10 cases of child abuse & neglect were exacerbated by parental substance abuse – in most cases this was a long standing problem of at least 5 years
    67% of parents with children in child welfare require substance abuse treatment – child welfare can provide treatment to 31%
    Children whose parents abuse drugs are 3 times more likely to be abuse and 4 times more likely to be neglected that children of non-substance abusing parents
    Children whose families don’t receive appropriate treatment are more likely to end up in foster care, remain longer and re-enter once they have returned home than children whose families receive treatment
  • DHHS estimates that 75-80% of children in need of mental health services do not receive them
    More than 80% of children in foster car have developmental, emotional or behavioral problems.
  • In 2001, 66.7% of children under age 18 reported having private health insurance

Transcript

  • 1. 1 Does Anyone Really Care? Providing HIV/AIDS Prevention Education to Youth in Foster Care Glenda Clare G. Portlynn Clare & Associates g_portlynnclare@hotmail.com
  • 2. 2 Objectives: By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:  List factors resulting in foster care placement  Identify factors which place foster care youth at high risk for HIV  Identify strategies to provide HIV prevention and treatment services to youth in foster care  Identify resources for future work with youth in foster care
  • 3. 3 A Snapshot of America’s Children Child population under age 18 in 2002 72,894,483 White children under 18 in 2002 76.6% Non-white children under 18 in 2002 23.4% Children & youth under 12 in 2000 66.4% Children & youth 12 & older in 2000 33.6%
  • 4. 4 America’s Most Vulnerable Children Referrals of possible abuse & neglect 2,673,000 Children substantiated or indicated as abused or neglected 903,089 Children who died as a result of abuse or neglect 1,321 Children in foster care 9/30/01 542,000 Children adopted from foster care 50,000 Children waiting to be adopted 9/30/01 126,000 Children living in poverty 12,000,000 Children living in extreme poverty 5,000,000
  • 5. 5 Overview of the Foster Care System Goal: To ensure the safety and well-being of vulnerable children
  • 6. 6 Ethnicities of Youth in Care 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% White Black Hispanic Indian Other
  • 7. 7 Ages of Youth in Care 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% <6 years 6-15 years 16+ years
  • 8. 8 Entry into the System  Abuse and Neglect – Domestic Violence – Mental Illness – Physical Illness – Poverty – Substance Abuse
  • 9. 9 Entry into the System  Parental Death  Parental Incarceration  Physical Abuse  Psychological Abuse  Sexual Abuse  Substance Abuse
  • 10. 10 Out of Home Care  Foster Care Homes  Group Homes  Institutions  Juvenile Justice  Kinship Care
  • 11. 11 HIV Prevention Education Assumption: Individuals engage in high-risk activities not because they lack relevant information but because they lack behavioral and cognitive skills to use available information
  • 12. 12 Characteristics of Youth in Care Affected & High Risk for Infection  Agency Distrust  Behavioral & Emotional Problems  Family Instability & Disruption  Health Problems
  • 13. 13 Characteristics of Youth in Care Affected & High Risk for Infection  Hidden & Underserved  History of physical & sexual abuse  Homelessness  Incarceration
  • 14. 14 Characteristics of Youth in Care Affected & High Risk for Infection  Infection of Significant Others  Incarceration  Infection of Significant Others  Lack of Medical Insurance
  • 15. 15 Characteristics of Youth in Care Affected & High Risk for Infection  Public Assistance  School Failure  Sexually Transmitted Disease  Shame & Stigma
  • 16. 16 Characteristics of Youth in Care Affected & High Risk for Infection  Substance Abuse  Teen Pregnancy & Early Parenting  Unemployment
  • 17. 17 Expanded Life Options & HIV Risk When there are few life options, programs focusing on changing knowledge, attitudes & skills may not be sufficient to motivate youth to reduce risky behaviors
  • 18. 18 Expanded Life Options & HIV Risk Educational aspirations & positive relationships with teachers are predictors of AIDS related knowledge, attitudes & behaviors
  • 19. 19 Expanded Life Options & HIV Risk Behavior change should be linked to skills and incentives for educational planning and expanding life options
  • 20. 20 Expanded Life Options & HIV Risk An integral part of disease prevention is believing one’s future is worth protecting
  • 21. 21 Expanded Life Options & HIV Risk Provided with life options, youth may think and behave differently – they may act as if they have a future worth living
  • 22. 22 Expanded Life Options & HIV Risk HIV prevention is an integral part of preparing youth for the transition to adulthood
  • 23. 23 8 Key Components of Prevention Services for High Risk Youth 1. Adolescent Specific HIV Testing & Counseling Services 2. Basic Needs Services 3. Case-management 4. HIV+ Youth Speakers
  • 24. 24 8 Key Components of Prevention Services for High Risk Youth 5. Outreach 6. Peer Education 7. Wide Referral Network 8. Youth Involvement (Staff & Volunteers)
  • 25. 25 Interdisciplinary Connections  Child Protective Services  Juvenile Justice System  Mental Health  Public Health  Public School System
  • 26. 26 Resources  Adolescent AIDS Program, Montefiore Medical Center www.adolescentaids.org  C2P www.adolescentaids.org/c2p.html  Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Statistics By Cumulative Cases by Age www.cdc.gov/hiv/stats.htm Child Welfare League of America www.cwla.org