Learning Objectives• Discuss adult learning• Explain the methods of teaching used to “roll-  out” The Sanctuary Model at S...
• Part of The Long Island Home: In operation since 1882  (Long Island Home for Nervous Invalids)• Current configuration:  ...
What is Machinima?• Machinima is video that is created in a 3D  virtual world  – World of Warcaft©  – Minecraft©  – Second...
South Oaks Hospital StaffOur aging population: in US, retirement of 10,000 health  care professionals daily (Marx, 2006)• ...
Generational Differences• Technology: the younger the age group, the  higher percentage who use the Internet for  school, ...
Learning Styles – Adult Learning• Motivation: Need to know WHY we’re learning something—  what’s in it for me? Not so inte...
Evidence – Learning StylesLearning style inventory (Dunn and Dunn, 1978)• Auditory-Process new info best when it is spoken...
South Oaks Sanctuary Rollout• Auditory   – PowerPoint   – Staff meeting discussions   – Catchy phrases – 7Cs• Visual   – A...
Our Rationale for Use of Machinima• Simulations can be used to help learners visualize complex systems. It can  be replaye...
Non-violent CommunicationFocus during “Open Communication Month”Our first attempt at multi-modal learning:• Auditory: Lect...
Non-Violent Communication
Seven Commitments - Machinima• Wanted examples of the commitments that  would be understood by employees in the  hospital•...
The Seven Commitments
Sanctuary In Action - Machinima • What we were hearing:    – “That’s not very Sanctuary”    – “What’s Sanctuary anyway?” •...
Sanctuary in Action
Vicarious Trauma Machinima More staff ask to do voiceovers Starting to address more sensitive topics  – One staff member s...
Vicarious Trauma
Growth & ChangeLooking toward the future:Adult learners “have a lot going on”--Training  needs to be timely, convenient, a...
References• Dunn, R., Dunn, K. (1978). Teaching students through individual  learning styles: A practical approach. Reston...
Machinima for Sanctuary
Machinima for Sanctuary
Machinima for Sanctuary
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Machinima for Sanctuary

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The presentation given at The Sanctuary Network Days on November 17th, 2011.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education
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Machinima for Sanctuary

  1. 1. Learning Objectives• Discuss adult learning• Explain the methods of teaching used to “roll- out” The Sanctuary Model at South Oaks• Talk about the rationale for the teaching methods used• Learn about machinima, and its use in education
  2. 2. • Part of The Long Island Home: In operation since 1882 (Long Island Home for Nervous Invalids)• Current configuration: – 150-bed inpatient psychiatric hospital providing behavioral health treatment for children to seniors, Chemical dependency detoxification and rehabilitation – 30-bed Partial Hospital for Adolescents and Adults – Outpatient Addictions clinic – Child/adolescent mental health clinic – Vocational Services in the community – Prevention Service – PRC, Speakers’ Bureau
  3. 3. What is Machinima?• Machinima is video that is created in a 3D virtual world – World of Warcaft© – Minecraft© – Second Life™• Benefits – Unlimited scenery – Lower cost than live videos
  4. 4. South Oaks Hospital StaffOur aging population: in US, retirement of 10,000 health care professionals daily (Marx, 2006)• Silent Generation (b. 1925-1945)-2% SOH staff.• Baby boomers (b. 1946-1964) – 39% SOH staff. Work- centric, independent, goal-oriented, competitive• Generation X – (b. 1965-1981)-32% SOH staff. Individualistic, flexible, value a work/life balance• Millenials – (b. 1982-current)- 26% SOH staff. Gravitate toward group activity, fascinated by new technologies—computers not technology but an integral part of life, racially/ethnically diverse, believe it’s “cool to be smart” More…
  5. 5. Generational Differences• Technology: the younger the age group, the higher percentage who use the Internet for school, work, and leisure
  6. 6. Learning Styles – Adult Learning• Motivation: Need to know WHY we’re learning something— what’s in it for me? Not so interested in knowledge just for knowledge sake.• Relevancy: Need to know HOW the new knowledge can be directly applied to our work.• Context: Adults bring a wealth of life experience and knowledge-need to connect the new learning to the base of what we already know. This helps with transference of knowledge to new settings. (Knowles)
  7. 7. Evidence – Learning StylesLearning style inventory (Dunn and Dunn, 1978)• Auditory-Process new info best when it is spoken- lectures, discussions, talking through the process• Visual-Process new info best when visually illustrated or demonstrated. Graphics, pictures, images, demonstrations• Kinesthetic-Process new info best when it can be touched or manipulated-Hands on, role play, experiential• Adults have increased variation in learning styles — individual differences among people increase with age. Best to use a combination of the three above• Difficult absorbing information after 10minutes- segments should be no more than 20min
  8. 8. South Oaks Sanctuary Rollout• Auditory – PowerPoint – Staff meeting discussions – Catchy phrases – 7Cs• Visual – Articles in the Acorn – Acronyms: SECONDS – Badge tags on Safety Plans, Red Flag meetings, memory prompts• Kinesthetic – Role-plays – ROPEs course activities tied into Sanctuary
  9. 9. Our Rationale for Use of Machinima• Simulations can be used to help learners visualize complex systems. It can be replayed, slowed down, etc• Adult learning principles-able to show how the staff would benefit from using Sanctuary, using specific examples that happen at South Oaks, some coming from staff input about their past experiences• Sensory learning styles-auditory, visual, and kinesthetic input; brief clips• Staff population becoming more “Millennial”• Takes the intimidation out of learning: – Includes familiar settings , situations, and peers’ voices – Positive emotion paves the way for memory and higher-order thought, while fear and intimidation can cause the learner to go into fight or flight
  10. 10. Non-violent CommunicationFocus during “Open Communication Month”Our first attempt at multi-modal learning:• Auditory: Lecture in staff meetings• Visual: Posters, ID badge card, articles in Acorn and info in e-mails• Kinesthetic: Role play in staff meetings, mandatory education days, orientation—could be the most effective, but intimidating….
  11. 11. Non-Violent Communication
  12. 12. Seven Commitments - Machinima• Wanted examples of the commitments that would be understood by employees in the hospital• Wanted to start to involve hospital staff in the process
  13. 13. The Seven Commitments
  14. 14. Sanctuary In Action - Machinima • What we were hearing: – “That’s not very Sanctuary” – “What’s Sanctuary anyway?” • Still having trouble “making it real” for staff: Why? – Many of the Sanctuary concepts are abstract – Examples could help
  15. 15. Sanctuary in Action
  16. 16. Vicarious Trauma Machinima More staff ask to do voiceovers Starting to address more sensitive topics – One staff member submits a script that she wrote in hopes of having it made into a machinima on the topic of vicarious traumatization
  17. 17. Vicarious Trauma
  18. 18. Growth & ChangeLooking toward the future:Adult learners “have a lot going on”--Training needs to be timely, convenient, and accessible. Coming soon: individual access to machinima on our desktops and beyondTeaching the patient population-how can Machinima be used for psychoeducation or teaching commitments to the patients?
  19. 19. References• Dunn, R., Dunn, K. (1978). Teaching students through individual learning styles: A practical approach. Reston, VA: Reston Publishing.• Kegan, R. (2000).What “form” transforms? A constructive- developmental perspective on transformational learning. In J. Mezirow & Associates (Eds.), Learning as transformation: Critical perspectives on a theory in progress (pp. 35-70) San-Fransisco: Jossey-Bass.• Knowles, M. (1980). The modern practice of adult education: From pedagogy to andragogy. (2nd ed.). New York: Cambridge Books.• Lancaster, L. C., Stillman, D. (2002). When generations collide: Who they are. Why they clash. How to solve the generational puzzle at work. New York: Harper Business.• Marx, G. (2006). Sixteen Trends: Their Profound Impact on Our Future. Alexandria,

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