Plagiarism
Dr. Faisal Al Haddad
Consultant of Family Medicine &
Occupational Health
PSMMC
Definition of Plagiarism
The word plagiarism comes from the Latin plagiarius meaning "kidnapper"
Plagiarism (noun)
1: an a...
?Why is plagiarism important


Plagiarism is theft of intellectual property.



Plagiarism is cheating.



Plagiarism m...
Some of the things that you think you know
about plagiarism may be wrong

Carnegie Mellon University, Enhancing Education,...
Some of the things that you think you know
about plagiarism may be wrong

•

Alive or dead, it does not matter. If it is n...
(Indirect quotation (Paraphrasing


It must be almost entirely in your own words. You must use new
synonyms and new phras...
Example
Source:
Unless steps are taken to provide a predictable and stable energy
supply in the face of growing demand, th...
Example
Correct paraphrase:
Doe (1999) believes that we must find a more reliable source of
energy if we are to have a dep...
Direct Quotation


Quotations must be exact, word-for-word as they appear in the
original document.



Quotes require a ...
The Plagiarism Handbook by Roger A. Harris, http://www.pyrczak.com/antiplagiarism/index.htm.
you cannot use someone else’s work without proper citation
even if he gave you permission.

You may even have to cite your...
What about all that “free” stuff people put on
?the web? Can you use that

● The “free” stuff has a specific use and can o...
Copyright Violation vs. Plagiarism



Copyright law is very complex.



Under the terms of “Fair Use,” you may use quote...
“Plagiarism and Cheating,” skills4study, Palgrave, Macmillan.
http://www.palgrave.com/skills4study/html/reading_writing/pl...
Common knowledge
Common knowledge consists of:


Information that is easily observed – the sky is blue, but not a
detaile...
?How to cite


Author-date (Harvard) Referencing System
- Short references
- Long references



Numerical (Vancouver) Re...
Resources
•

Brannan JA (2005) Plagiarism [online].
http://library.uwa.edu/Help/Plagiarism.ppt
[Accessed September 1st 200...
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Plagiarism

  1. 1. Plagiarism Dr. Faisal Al Haddad Consultant of Family Medicine & Occupational Health PSMMC
  2. 2. Definition of Plagiarism The word plagiarism comes from the Latin plagiarius meaning "kidnapper" Plagiarism (noun) 1: an act or instance of plagiarizing 2: something plagiarized Plagiarise (verb) 1: to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own 2: use (another's production) without crediting the source Merriam-Webster Dictionary
  3. 3. ?Why is plagiarism important  Plagiarism is theft of intellectual property.  Plagiarism is cheating.  Plagiarism may result in receiving an ‘F’ or zero for the assignment or research.  It robs you of the educational experiences involved in research, thinking, and writing.
  4. 4. Some of the things that you think you know about plagiarism may be wrong Carnegie Mellon University, Enhancing Education, “Plagiarism and the Web.” http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/resources/plagiarism.html .
  5. 5. Some of the things that you think you know about plagiarism may be wrong • Alive or dead, it does not matter. If it is not your own idea, you must cite your source!! • If you translate or paraphrase something, you must still give a citation • You may have been told that if you put something into your own words, you need not cite. This is incorrect. The material is still someone else’s idea and requires acknowledgement.
  6. 6. (Indirect quotation (Paraphrasing  It must be almost entirely in your own words. You must use new synonyms and new phrases. Only technical terms should be repeated.  Any exact words that are retained should have quotation marks around them.  The sentence structure should be yours, not the same as in the source.  Do not add ideas, interpretations, explanations, or assessments.
  7. 7. Example Source: Unless steps are taken to provide a predictable and stable energy supply in the face of growing demand, the nation may be in danger of sudden power losses or even extended blackouts, thus damaging our industrial and information-based economies. – John Doe, 1999, p.231. Inadequate paraphrase: Doe (1999) recommends that the government take action to provide a predictable and stable energy supply because of constantly growing demand. Otherwise, we may be in danger of losing power or even experiencing extended blackouts. These circumstances could damage our industrial and information-based economy. (p.231).
  8. 8. Example Correct paraphrase: Doe (1999) believes that we must find a more reliable source of energy if we are to have a dependable electricity supply. Without this, the nation’s economic base may be damaged by blackouts (p.231). Using Sources Effectively: Strengthening Your Writing and Avoiding Plagiarism. Robert A. Harris. Los Angeles, California: Pyrczak Publishers, 2002.
  9. 9. Direct Quotation  Quotations must be exact, word-for-word as they appear in the original document.  Quotes require a citation in addition to the use of quote marks.  Every quoted word needs to be cited. Even a short phrase or single word must be quoted and cited if it is unusual  Direct in-line quotation vs. Direct block quotation
  10. 10. The Plagiarism Handbook by Roger A. Harris, http://www.pyrczak.com/antiplagiarism/index.htm.
  11. 11. you cannot use someone else’s work without proper citation even if he gave you permission. You may even have to cite yourself. If you created a work for a previous paper or presentation, and you are using it again, you must cite your previous work.
  12. 12. What about all that “free” stuff people put on ?the web? Can you use that ● The “free” stuff has a specific use and can only be used free for the intended use. If you use the words, graphics, or ideas, you must give a citation.  There are many sites that will sell you an essay or term paper. Presenting this material as your own is plagiarism. Some of the papers for sale sites do have disclaimers saying that you must cite their work
  13. 13. Copyright Violation vs. Plagiarism  Copyright law is very complex.  Under the terms of “Fair Use,” you may use quotes and ideas for your class work without getting permission of the authors IF you give proper citations. If you are writing or creating for profit, you must get permission from others to use their ideas even if you use citations.
  14. 14. “Plagiarism and Cheating,” skills4study, Palgrave, Macmillan. http://www.palgrave.com/skills4study/html/reading_writing/plagiarism.htm.
  15. 15. Common knowledge Common knowledge consists of:  Information that is easily observed – the sky is blue, but not a detailed explanation of why the sky is blue.  Commonly reported facts – King Abdulaziz was the first King of Saudi Arabia, but not the information that historians have to say about King Abdulaziz.  Common sayings such as proverbs – “easy come, easy go”  Common knowledge does not need to be cited.
  16. 16. ?How to cite  Author-date (Harvard) Referencing System - Short references - Long references  Numerical (Vancouver) Referencing System - Short references - Long references
  17. 17. Resources • Brannan JA (2005) Plagiarism [online]. http://library.uwa.edu/Help/Plagiarism.ppt [Accessed September 1st 2009] • Oakey D, Treece p. (2008) English for Academic Purposes. University of Birmingham

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