Difficult learner

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Difficult learner

  1. 1. DIFFICULT LEARNER Dr Faisal Al Haddad Consultant of Family Medicine & Occupational Health PSMMC
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION HAVE YOU EVER DEAL WITH ?DIFFICULT LEARNER
  3. 3. POSSIBLE REASONS  The teacher may be an excellent and successful practitioner but have limited pedagogical skills and teaching experience.  The learner may be underprepared for what is being taught.  The learner may learn comparatively slowly .
  4. 4. POSSIBLE REASONS  The learner may be insecure, as manifested by behaviors as disparate as hostility, overconfidence, disorganization, or dependence.  Less commonly, the learner may be impaired by mental illness or substance abuse.
  5. 5. Types of Difficult Learners Withdrawers Arguers Supertalkers Monopolizers
  6. 6. Withdrawers  Aloof, quiet, and disinterested are words commonly used to describe withdrawers.  At first glance, withdrawers may not display inappropriate behaviors, but they're considered difficult because they don't provide feedback to help you gauge your effectiveness as a trainer.
  7. 7. Supertalkers  People who engage in side conversations or monopolize class time are supertalkers.  Their actions distract both you and the other course members.  To discourage supertalkers, establish guidelines at the beginning of the course for example, explain that you will give everyone an opportunity to participate.
  8. 8. .Arguers  Proving that they know more than the trainer is the favorite pastime of arguers.  Usually, they believe there's nothing a trainer can teach them that they don't already know.  Uncooperative and domineering arguers like to engage the trainer in time-consuming debates.  If you identify such a culprit, control your emotions. If you consent to argue, you lose focus and credibility.
  9. 9. Monopolizers  Constantly trying to provide all of the answers.  Monopolizers think they have more knowledge about the course content than anyone else in the room, including the trainer.  They believe that they know enough content to take over the class, and that's what they'd like to do.
  10. 10. ?Dealing with Difficult Learner Group 1  Withdrawers  Arguers Group 2  Supertalkers  Monopolizers
  11. 11. ?WHAT WOULD YOU DO A) Do nothing, and let the other participants deal with the disrupter. B) Dismiss class, pack your bags, and treat yourself to a much-needed vacation. C) Take a break, and ask the arguer whether you can address his or her concerns before or after class.
  12. 12. WHAT ARE THE MOTIVES ?BEHIND THESE BEHAVIORS
  13. 13. REFERENCES  A HANDBOOK FOR MEDICAL TEACHERS, DAVID NEWBLE, FOURTH EDITION 1996.  DEALING WITH PROBLEM LEARNER, NORMAN KAHN, Fam Med 2001;33(9):655-7  THE DIFFICULT LEARNER, QIANA CHARLES, AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT 2002.
  14. 14. THANK YOU

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