Using Data to Plan and Teach• The primary reasons to assess are to know what  students learned and what they did not learn...
Laws related to assessment• Elementary and Secondary Education Act  (ESEA) of 1965• Rehabilitation Act of 1973• Americans ...
Response to Intervention (RTI)• RTI is designed as a multi-tiered process to  identify and support students with learning ...
Additional purposes of assessment• Establishing classroom equilibrium• Planning and conducting instruction and  determinin...
Types of high-stakes tests• Tests given at the end of courses or to measure  yearly progress have been termed as high-stak...
Impediments to student success• Five barriers generally impede success of  students with disabilities on high-stakes  asse...
Using Universal Design• Universally designed assessments:  – Do not change the standard of performance  – Are not meant to...
Using Universal Design• Seven elements of design for UDL  assignments:  –   Accessible, non-biased items  –   Inclusive as...
Accommodations for students   who need additional support• Classroom assessments  –   Change in assessment setting  –   Ch...
Teaching strategies for            assessment• Generalized test-taking skills: skills necessary to  prepare and study for ...
Teaching strategies for               assessment• Generalized test-taking skills:   –   General study skills   –   General...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Using data to plan and teach

1,068 views

Published on

Using Data to Plan and Teach

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,068
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Using data to plan and teach

  1. 1. Using Data to Plan and Teach• The primary reasons to assess are to know what students learned and what they did not learn, to know if the methods and materials used or provided were helpful, and to know what to do next• Assessments give us the data we need to be reflective about our teaching and the learning experiences of our students• Richard Evans - http://outskirtspress.com/webpage.php?ISBN=9781432779245
  2. 2. Laws related to assessment• Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965• Rehabilitation Act of 1973• Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990• No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB)• Education of All Handicapped Children Act (EAHC) of 1972• Individuals with Disabilities Educational Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEIA-2004)
  3. 3. Response to Intervention (RTI)• RTI is designed as a multi-tiered process to identify and support students with learning and behavior problems• The essential components for effective implementation of RTI are: – high-quality, scientifically-based classroom instruction – ongoing student assessment – tiered instruction – parent involvement
  4. 4. Additional purposes of assessment• Establishing classroom equilibrium• Planning and conducting instruction and determining instructional effectiveness• Diagnosing student strengths and weaknesses and placing pupils• Providing feedback and motivational incentives• Diagnosing pupil problems and disabilities• Judging and grading academic learning and progress
  5. 5. Types of high-stakes tests• Tests given at the end of courses or to measure yearly progress have been termed as high-stakes – Individual high-stakes tests include exit exams that determine graduation status – Large scale tests include the NCLB mandated examinations of student progress toward meeting state standards where students are expected to show Annual Yearly Progress (AYP)
  6. 6. Impediments to student success• Five barriers generally impede success of students with disabilities on high-stakes assessments: – Inadequate opportunities to learn – Placement in more restrictive settings – Reasonable accommodations are not provided – Remediation is not offered or is offered in an ineffective manner – Over-reliance on data for one test score
  7. 7. Using Universal Design• Universally designed assessments: – Do not change the standard of performance – Are not meant to replace accommodations – May benefit all students including English Language Learners
  8. 8. Using Universal Design• Seven elements of design for UDL assignments: – Accessible, non-biased items – Inclusive assessment population – Precisely defined constructs – Amenable to accommodations – Simple, clear, intuitive instructions and procedures – Maximum readability and comprehensibility – Maximum legibility
  9. 9. Accommodations for students who need additional support• Classroom assessments – Change in assessment setting – Changes in duration or organization of time – Changes in scheduling – Changes in presentation – Changes in response mode
  10. 10. Teaching strategies for assessment• Generalized test-taking skills: skills necessary to prepare and study for tests – Reading – Understanding and following written and oral directions – Understanding the requirements of specific types of questions (i.e., multiple choices, matching, essay, etc.) – Marking answer sheets correctly – Proofreading and correcting answers – Managing time during the test – Controlling test anxiety
  11. 11. Teaching strategies for assessment• Generalized test-taking skills: – General study skills – General test-taking strategies – Mastering test directions – Mastering test formats – Taking multiple choice tests – Using separate answer sheets – Cognitive strategies

×