from Deah Curry PhD, CPC therapist & client attraction coach www.TheNoHypeMentor.com 17 Tips for  Writing Strong  Client A...
Quick Summary:   10 Things to Be Sure to Do <ul><li>Ignore the prompts when you can </li></ul><ul><li>Write in the 2 nd  a...
Ignore the prompts when you can <ul><li>Prompts are the names or labels of the fields (sections or boxes) into which you t...
Write in the 2 nd  and 1 st  person  (you, and I) <ul><li>BE warm and friendly by how personal you are in writing </li></u...
Speaking directly to  your prospective ideal client <ul><li>Hold an image of your ideal client in mind when you write your...
Be direct and concrete about the central problem they are concerned about <ul><li>Name  the problem in language the client...
Use words that specify emotions clients feel  in words they use in talking with friends <ul><li>Use strong ‘normal’ words ...
Name how the client is likely feeling  and what they emotionally want <ul><li>Strong:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At your wit’s...
Describe what the client is likely experiencing,  from their perspective <ul><li>Strong:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Has your p...
Keep the focus 80% on them,  and 20% on how you can help <ul><li>Strong:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are you wanting to stop fe...
Use your 20% to mention your  unique selling points <ul><li>Unique selling points (USPs) are how you are different from yo...
End with a call to action <ul><li>Strong:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>See my website for a free article on… and some tips to he...
7 Things to NOT Do <ul><li>Don’t try to attract different niches with the same profile </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use profess...
Don’t try to attract different niches  with the same profile <ul><li>It’s human nature to want a specialist for our proble...
Don’t use professional jargon <ul><li>Professional jargon only impresses other clinicians.  </li></ul><ul><li>It intimidat...
Don’t try to appeal to intellect <ul><li>When people are in pain and need a therapist, they make hiring decisions based in...
Don’t list your goals for their therapy <ul><li>Save these if you must use them for your website. </li></ul><ul><li>Even b...
Don’t write in the impersonal 3 rd  person  as if you don’t know yourself <ul><li>The 3 rd  person tense doesn’t look more...
Don’t list or try to explain  the techniques  and processes you use <ul><li>Most clients don’t know the difference between...
Don’t focus on your professional experience and credentials <ul><li>This isn’t the first thing clients want to know.  Don’...
Thanks for watching Are you a counselor in private practice struggling to make your business thrive? Feel like self-promot...
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17 Tips for PT Profiles

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Is your locator directory profile resulting in more clients? If not, you may need to rewrite. These tips will help you craft a compelling mini marketing pitch.

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17 Tips for PT Profiles

  1. 1. from Deah Curry PhD, CPC therapist & client attraction coach www.TheNoHypeMentor.com 17 Tips for Writing Strong Client Attracting PT ‘Profiles ’ Click or push space bar if slide doesn’t advance fast enough for you Home Find a Therapist Topics Tests Magazine Psych Basics Blogs Diagnosis Dictionary
  2. 2. Quick Summary: 10 Things to Be Sure to Do <ul><li>Ignore the prompts when you can </li></ul><ul><li>Write in the 2 nd and 1 st person (you, and I) </li></ul><ul><li>Speak directly to your prospective ideal client </li></ul><ul><li>Be direct and concrete about the central problem they are concerned about </li></ul><ul><li>Use words that specify emotions clients feel in words they use in talking with friends </li></ul><ul><li>Name how the client is likely feeling and what they emotionally want </li></ul><ul><li>Describe what the client is likely experiencing, from their perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Keep the focus 80% on them, and 20% on how you can help </li></ul><ul><li>Use your 20% to mention your unique selling points </li></ul><ul><li>End with a call to action </li></ul>
  3. 3. Ignore the prompts when you can <ul><li>Prompts are the names or labels of the fields (sections or boxes) into which you type </li></ul><ul><li>In most cases prompts are suggestions, not commands </li></ul><ul><li>In most cases prompts will mislead you into focusing in the wrong direction </li></ul>
  4. 4. Write in the 2 nd and 1 st person (you, and I) <ul><li>BE warm and friendly by how personal you are in writing </li></ul><ul><li>Write like you’re a real person who genuinely cares </li></ul><ul><li>Write like you can actually see the person reading your profile, so they feel seen at that moment </li></ul><ul><li>Write like you talk in person </li></ul>
  5. 5. Speaking directly to your prospective ideal client <ul><li>Hold an image of your ideal client in mind when you write your profile </li></ul><ul><li>Start profiles by asking them pointed questions about their suffering or problem </li></ul><ul><li>Be succinct. Keep sentences short. </li></ul><ul><li>Be descriptive so they recognize you are speaking to them about them </li></ul>
  6. 6. Be direct and concrete about the central problem they are concerned about <ul><li>Name the problem in language the client would use. </li></ul><ul><li>For example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can’t sleep ( not: insomnia) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fighting with your mate too often ( not: marital discord) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If you don’t know your ideal client’s central problem, flesh out your concept of ideal client </li></ul>
  7. 7. Use words that specify emotions clients feel in words they use in talking with friends <ul><li>Use strong ‘normal’ words like: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>mad, sad, glad, hurt, scared, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ticked off, worried, feel lost </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>unruly, uncooperative </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Avoid weak clinical jargon for emotions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>depression, mood disorders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>behavioral patterns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>emotional dysregulation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ambivalence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>suicidal ideation </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Name how the client is likely feeling and what they emotionally want <ul><li>Strong: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At your wit’s end and wanting to walk away? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Weak: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A sense of resignation arises when…. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Describe what the client is likely experiencing, from their perspective <ul><li>Strong: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Has your precious baby turned into a fire breathing monster? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Weak: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developmental issues combined with never having learned effective parenting skills…. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Keep the focus 80% on them, and 20% on how you can help <ul><li>Strong: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are you wanting to stop feeling scared and start feeling bold confidence every day? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Weak: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>As a cognitive behavioral therapist, I provide a safe container in which to explore….. </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Use your 20% to mention your unique selling points <ul><li>Unique selling points (USPs) are how you are different from your competition </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of USPs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2 hour therapy sessions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>email support between sessions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>house calls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>walk in appointments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>phone or webcam sessions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>free help on your website </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. End with a call to action <ul><li>Strong: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>See my website for a free article on… and some tips to help immediately cope with… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why suffer any longer? Call today for your no-cost consult. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Weak: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>My goal is to … </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I provide a safe, nurturing environment where your needs for privacy are ensured. </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. 7 Things to NOT Do <ul><li>Don’t try to attract different niches with the same profile </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t use professional jargon </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t try to appeal to intellect </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t list your goals for their therapy </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t write in the impersonal 3 rd person as if you don’t know yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t list or try to explain the techniques and processes you use </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t focus on your professional experience and credentials </li></ul>
  14. 14. Don’t try to attract different niches with the same profile <ul><li>It’s human nature to want a specialist for our problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t market as a generalist if you want to succeed </li></ul><ul><li>If you can’t hone your marketing to one client niche, write a profile for each niche and alternate them every 4-6 months </li></ul>
  15. 15. Don’t use professional jargon <ul><li>Professional jargon only impresses other clinicians. </li></ul><ul><li>It intimidates clients seeking help. </li></ul><ul><li>Professional jargon creates distance when you want to be pulling clients in closer. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Don’t try to appeal to intellect <ul><li>When people are in pain and need a therapist, they make hiring decisions based in emotions. </li></ul><ul><li>Most purchasing decisions made when people are suffering are made by their hurting inner child. </li></ul><ul><li>Appealing to intellect and rational benefit of therapy risks missing the emotional readiness to hire. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Don’t list your goals for their therapy <ul><li>Save these if you must use them for your website. </li></ul><ul><li>Even better, save these for your intake and disclosure forms. </li></ul><ul><li>The only goal prospective clients care about is whether you intend to help them heal. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Don’t write in the impersonal 3 rd person as if you don’t know yourself <ul><li>The 3 rd person tense doesn’t look more professional. </li></ul><ul><li>It looks like you’re scared and hiding, or pompous. </li></ul><ul><li>If your profile comes across as impersonal it will inhibit people from calling for an appointment. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Don’t list or try to explain the techniques and processes you use <ul><li>Most clients don’t know the difference between CBT and EMDR, etc. They just want to stop their pain. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t try to sell processes. Focus on conveying that you help people get the results they want. </li></ul><ul><li>It can be assumed that you provide a warm, friendly, confidential, helpful atmosphere. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Don’t focus on your professional experience and credentials <ul><li>This isn’t the first thing clients want to know. Don’t waste a profile’s limited space this way. </li></ul><ul><li>Clients want to know you understand them and can help. Then they’re interested in your credentials. </li></ul><ul><li>Save your experience and credentials for your compelling story on your website (the about me page) </li></ul>
  21. 21. Thanks for watching Are you a counselor in private practice struggling to make your business thrive? Feel like self-promotion is sleazy, discouraging, or scary? Want a proven, step by step action plan & expert coach? You CAN spend less time at marketing, save more money, get more clients ~ Find out how! Email DrDeah at DeahCurry.net for a 20 minute no-cost consult to share your marketing struggles, ask key questions, and talk about solutions. Presentation © 2010 by Deah Curry PhD, CPC www.TheNoHypeMentor.com All rights reserved in all media No reproduction or circulation without permission

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