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Games For Health 2008 Food Fury
 

Games For Health 2008 Food Fury

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This set of slides was presented at the Games for Health Conference in Baltimore MD, 2008. Food Fury is a game to teach kids about nutrition. http://www.playnormous.com/game_foodfury.cfm

This set of slides was presented at the Games for Health Conference in Baltimore MD, 2008. Food Fury is a game to teach kids about nutrition. http://www.playnormous.com/game_foodfury.cfm

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Games For Health 2008 Food Fury Games For Health 2008 Food Fury Presentation Transcript

  • Food Fury : Casual Serious Games for Learning
    • University of Texas
      • School of Public Health
        • Nutrition Experts
      • School of Health Information Science
    • Game Design, Learning &Technology
    • Archimage
      • Playnormous
        • Development
  • Problem: Childhood Obesity
    • Recent research has shown that the obesity rates among children are increasing.
    • This increase is alarming, as obesity is associated with chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
    • It is thought that the lack of physical activity and the consumption of high energy foods contribute significantly to the problem
  • Solution: A Fun Way to Learn
    • Create an electronic environment as an intervention for healthy behavior change.
    • Use games as a way to engage kids in learning about nutrition and physical activity.
    • Food Fury is a game to be used within a suite of casual games in an electronic environment as part of an after school program that includes exercise.
  •  
  • Food Classification Instructions
    • Food Fury
    • Game Board
    • color coded food tiles
    • food descriptions
    • timed gameplay
    • time bonuses
    • tile mixup function
  • Game Mechanic
    • Select food tiles in
    • like-groups of Go,
    • Slow, or Whoa. To
    • remove tiles from
    • the board and get
    • points, double click
    • or press the enter
    • button on the right
    • of the game board.
  • Pilot Testing Methods
    • Convenience sample of 32, 3rd to 6th graders in an after school program, in Houston, TX and Bend, OR.
    • Inclusion criteria: children must be engaged in gameplay and get to at least level 3.
    • One sample, pretest-post test design
  • Demographics
    • Average Age: 10 years old
    • Age range 8-12 years, Grade range 3-6th
    • Majority of the children in 4th grade (n=14)
    • 16 girls and 16 boys
    • 46% Hispanic
    • 28% Caucasian
    • 21% African American
    • 4% Asian
  • Computer Literacy
    • How often do you use the internet? 3.6
      • 1 everyday - to - 5 once a month
    • Rate yourself - internet, Average 3.4
      • 1 much worse - to - 5 much better
    • Rate yourself - computer, Average 2.9
      • 1 much worse - to - 5 much better
    • 25 of the 32 children had a computer at home
  • Testing Tool
    • Children categorized 44 food icons as either Go, Slow, or Whoa.
    • 40 of the icons where foods that were represented in the game and 6 were novel.
    • Children filled out the pretest 0-3 days before their exposure to the game.
    • All children played at least until they got up to level 3.
    Go Slow Whoa circle one answer
  • Knowledge Results
    • Items seen in game
      • 21.2 to 24.6, Delta of 3.4 items
        • On average, kids could recognize 3.4 more food items correctly on the post test
    • Eliminating high knowledge items
      • 13.7 to 19.2, Delta of 5.5 items
        • If you eliminate the items that got high scores on both the pretest and the post-test the positive learning change was even greater
  • Change by Grade
    • Education Delta
    • 3rd graders - 0
    • 4th graders - 3.5
    • 5th graders - 5
    • 6th graders - 5.2
  • Time on Task
    • Three children returned and voluntarily continued to play the game for 30-40 minutes. (50-70min)
    • For these children with the additional exposure, the average pretests were 31.7 (72%) and the average second posttest scores were 40 (90.9%).
    • The longer the engaged exposure to the game, the closer to 100% correct identification.
  • Other results
    • Children where asked if they would play the game outside of school and all answered yes.
    • From a set of words that ranged from fun and exciting to boring, children chose:
    • Positive words: fun, cool, great, awesome,wow, nice
    • Negative words: confusing
    • Indicates an overall very high satisfaction
  • Usability
    • Scale: 1- no, 2- kind of, 3- yes
    • easy to use - 2.7
    • understand levels - 2.9
    • understand directions - 2.6
    • understand game scoring - 2.6
  • Some Quotes
    • “ it was fun because you got to have fun while learning”
    • “ The noises were kind of annoying. And the thing that made it fun was all the pressure.”
    • “ It was annoying cause it's it's kind of hard but fun cause it was learning.”
    • “ It was very awesome, it's awesome, the challenge.”
  • Conclusion
    • shows preliminary learning
    • overall satisfaction
    • points to ways we can improve
      • instructions to bring the children at a lower developmental level up to speed so they can play and learn
  • Yeah Right!
    • How do you think this game is actually going to prevent or treat obesity??
      • no, not really, its just a part of our plan to build a virtual world to support health behavior change
  •  
  • Monster Minis
  •  
  • Monster environments.
  • Monster environments.
  • Monster worlds.
  • Monster worlds.
    • Cynthia Phelps
    • University of Texas
    • Health Science Center at Houston
    • School of Health Information Science
    • [email_address]