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Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
Star Trek and Myers Briggs
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Star Trek and Myers Briggs

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A presentation about the Myers Briggs Type Indicator using profiles from the crew of Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek Voyager

A presentation about the Myers Briggs Type Indicator using profiles from the crew of Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek Voyager

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  • This presentation was developed for students in the introductory class of the MS in Human Services Leadership Program at St. Joseph’s College in New York. For more information about the program go to the program website at http://tinyurl.com/sjchsl

  • The MBTI or Myers Briggs as it is also called, is a very popular instrument that has been used for decades. As a result, while many people have heard of it, like these ladies, they may not know exactly what it is.
  • Let’s start with what Myers Briggs is not. It is not a test that explains why you don’t like your boss although it could provide some insight into why the two of you may be having difficulty communicating. It is not a diagnosis. There is no right or wrong type and having a strong preference in one area or another is not a disease. Finally, it is not something that you can pass or fail. The Myers Briggs test should not be used to select someone for a job or position. It is best used to help people understand their preferences for taking in and using information. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First some background.
  • Let’s start with what Myers Briggs is not. It is not a test that explains why you don’t like your boss although it could provide some insight into why the two of you may be having difficulty communicating. It is not a diagnosis. There is no right or wrong type and having a strong preference in one area or another is not a disease. Finally, it is not something that you can pass or fail. The Myers Briggs test should not be used to select someone for a job or position. It is best used to help people understand their preferences for taking in and using information. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First some background.
  • Let’s start with what Myers Briggs is not. It is not a test that explains why you don’t like your boss although it could provide some insight into why the two of you may be having difficulty communicating. It is not a diagnosis. There is no right or wrong type and having a strong preference in one area or another is not a disease. Finally, it is not something that you can pass or fail. The Myers Briggs test should not be used to select someone for a job or position. It is best used to help people understand their preferences for taking in and using information. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First some background.
  • The MBTI is based on the theories of noted psychologist Carl Jung. He believed that every person has three psychological dimensions that are each represented by two polar extremes. The first dimension reflects where we draw our psychological energy. The second reflects our preferences for how we perceive information and the third reflects our preferences for how we make decisions about that information. The word preferences is used deliberately because Jung believed that these dimensions reflect the natural tendencies that we are each born with. The second and third dimensions in particular - how we perceive information and how we make decisions about that information - are considering mental functions referred to specifically as the perceiving function for the second dimension and the judging function for the third dimension. The mother daughter team of Katherine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers at added a fourth dimension based upon our preferred mental function and the four letter MBTI was born. Let’s take a closer look at each dimension.
  • The MBTI is based on the theories of noted psychologist Carl Jung. He believed that every person has three psychological dimensions that are each represented by two polar extremes. The first dimension reflects where we draw our psychological energy. The second reflects our preferences for how we perceive information and the third reflects our preferences for how we make decisions about that information. The word preferences is used deliberately because Jung believed that these dimensions reflect the natural tendencies that we are each born with. The second and third dimensions in particular - how we perceive information and how we make decisions about that information - are considering mental functions referred to specifically as the perceiving function for the second dimension and the judging function for the third dimension. The mother daughter team of Katherine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers at added a fourth dimension based upon our preferred mental function and the four letter MBTI was born. Let’s take a closer look at each dimension.
  • The MBTI is based on the theories of noted psychologist Carl Jung. He believed that every person has three psychological dimensions that are each represented by two polar extremes. The first dimension reflects where we draw our psychological energy. The second reflects our preferences for how we perceive information and the third reflects our preferences for how we make decisions about that information. The word preferences is used deliberately because Jung believed that these dimensions reflect the natural tendencies that we are each born with. The second and third dimensions in particular - how we perceive information and how we make decisions about that information - are considering mental functions referred to specifically as the perceiving function for the second dimension and the judging function for the third dimension. The mother daughter team of Katherine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers at added a fourth dimension based upon our preferred mental function and the four letter MBTI was born. Let’s take a closer look at each dimension.
  • The MBTI is based on the theories of noted psychologist Carl Jung. He believed that every person has three psychological dimensions that are each represented by two polar extremes. The first dimension reflects where we draw our psychological energy. The second reflects our preferences for how we perceive information and the third reflects our preferences for how we make decisions about that information. The word preferences is used deliberately because Jung believed that these dimensions reflect the natural tendencies that we are each born with. The second and third dimensions in particular - how we perceive information and how we make decisions about that information - are considering mental functions referred to specifically as the perceiving function for the second dimension and the judging function for the third dimension. The mother daughter team of Katherine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers at added a fourth dimension based upon our preferred mental function and the four letter MBTI was born. Let’s take a closer look at each dimension.
  • The MBTI is based on the theories of noted psychologist Carl Jung. He believed that every person has three psychological dimensions that are each represented by two polar extremes. The first dimension reflects where we draw our psychological energy. The second reflects our preferences for how we perceive information and the third reflects our preferences for how we make decisions about that information. The word preferences is used deliberately because Jung believed that these dimensions reflect the natural tendencies that we are each born with. The second and third dimensions in particular - how we perceive information and how we make decisions about that information - are considering mental functions referred to specifically as the perceiving function for the second dimension and the judging function for the third dimension. The mother daughter team of Katherine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers at added a fourth dimension based upon our preferred mental function and the four letter MBTI was born. Let’s take a closer look at each dimension.
  • The MBTI is based on the theories of noted psychologist Carl Jung. He believed that every person has three psychological dimensions that are each represented by two polar extremes. The first dimension reflects where we draw our psychological energy. The second reflects our preferences for how we perceive information and the third reflects our preferences for how we make decisions about that information. The word preferences is used deliberately because Jung believed that these dimensions reflect the natural tendencies that we are each born with. The second and third dimensions in particular - how we perceive information and how we make decisions about that information - are considering mental functions referred to specifically as the perceiving function for the second dimension and the judging function for the third dimension. The mother daughter team of Katherine Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers at added a fourth dimension based upon our preferred mental function and the four letter MBTI was born. Let’s take a closer look at each dimension.
  • The first dimension refers to how we draw our energy and the two poles of that dimension are probably the most easily recognized. They are extraverting and introverting. Extraverts draw their energy from the other world. They are people oriented and like to initiate contact with others. They are expressive, gregarious and active. Introverts by contrast draw their energy from within and will find their energy drained by too much external contact. They are more private, and more likely to wait to be approached rather than to initiate contact. They are also more reserved, preferring intimacy and reflection. People sometimes make the mistake of believing that being an introvert means being shy but that is not the case. People who are shy, feel anxious about social contact. Being an introvert is a preference that does not necessarily cause introverts to feel any anxiety about it. They prefer less contact because of the effect that too much interaction has on their energy. So it is quite possible to be an introvert and not to be shy at all. Presidents Obama and Eisenhower would be considered introverts. President Clinton and both President Roosevelts were likely extraverts. Which letter are you? Go ahead and write it down.
  • Our second dimension represents the perceiving mental function. The two poles for this dimension are sensing and intuiting. Sensing people are detail oriented and present focused. They are the concrete, realistic and practical members of the team that create the action plan and see that it gets implemented. One quick way to guess whether someone is a sensing person is to look at their closet. If all of the hangers are facing the same direction, the garments are organized by length or color and they can spot whether something is hanging in the wrong place within 3 seconds of entering the room, they’re probably a sensing type. On the other end of the spectrum is the Intuiting type. For people with this strong preference, details make their eyes roll back in their heads. They prefer ideas. They are future-focused abstract thinkers with great imaginations and a love of concepts and theory. At a conference I once attended, a woman who clearly identified herself as a sensing type used herself to describe the difference between the two. She said, “You know those people who come up with great ideas that get everyone excited and inspired? I’m not that person. I’m the person that you give that great idea to and I’ll break it down into the steps you need to implement it.” Which one are you. Pick your letter using a S for sensing or an N for intuiting. We’ve already used I for introvert.
  • Our third dimension represents the Judging mental function and those preferences are Thinking and Feeling. As you would expect, those with a Thinking preference prefer to rely on logic and reason to make decisions. They are probing and analytical. Feeling types lean more on their emotions. They bring compassion and an accommodating and accepting nature to their decision making processes. Where Thinking types are seen as tough and objective, feeling types are seen as tender and empathetic. We can see the dividing line between Thinking and Feeling types most clearly when difficult decisions have to be made about people. If you had five kids and only four lollipops, how would you decide who would be left without one? If you’re thinking about the child whose least likely to be upset your probably a feeling type. If you’re thinking about the child who needs to lose the most weight, you’re probably a thinking type. Mark your letter - T for Thinking, F for feeling.
  • Our last dimension tells us about our preferred mental function. Judging types are systematic and structured. They prefer schedules. They always have a plan and they stick to it. Perceiving types like to go with the flow. They’re more flexible and spontaneous. There may be a plan, but they will likely wait until the very last minute to implement it. Write down your letter. J for Judging and P for Perceiving.
  • These four letters, equal your type. If this is your first time completing the MBTI, you’ll want to see whether your report verifies the four letter type that you’ve just written down. For most people it will and they will easily see themselves in the description of their type. However, if you don’t agree with your reported type once you see your report, remember that you are the best judge of what you prefer. There are many reasons why the reported type may be different from what you expected. Your results are based on the way that you answered the questions. So your mental or emotional state at the time you completed the instrument could effect the results. That can also explain any changes in type that may have occurred if you have taken the test before. Typically, your four letter type will remain constant throughout your life, however, changes in your life circumstance can cause a shift, particularly for dimensions were your preferences did not clearly favor one type over its opposite. Reported or verified, we all belong to one of 16 types.
  • Now we’ll turn our attention to the officers and crew of the Star Fleet vessels Enterprise and Voyager to see these types in action.
  • First, Voyager’s Chief Engineer - Lt B’Lanna Torres. An ESTJ, she is The Go To Girl. This type has never confronted a situation they didn’t think they could handle. If you need a job done right, give it to them. This profile certainly describes Lt. Torres who has saved Voyager from destruction on more that one occasion due to her quick thinking and relentless approach to problem solving. On the other hand, she almost didn’t get the job when her aggressive manner and quick temper led her to punch her chief rival in the face, breaking his nose. Like Lt. Torres ESTJ’s can sometimes have difficulty with making strategic transitions.
  • The Enterprise’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Beverly Crusher is an ESFJ. As an extraverted feeling type, it’s no surprise that feelings guide this type’s solutions. They focus much of their attention on people. They are practical, realistic and even demanding in getting a job done. However, they need to be mindful of relying too much on detail and organization during times of stress.
  • It should come as no surprise that the Chief of Security for the Enterprise would be an ISTJ or that an ISTJ could be a Klingon. This type is concise and analytical. They have little time for triviality. They rely on logic and order and expect others to do the same. They are fiercely loyal but because they focus on details internally and then project their thinking preferences to others, they can appear dogmatic, insensitive and even bruising. I think that picture says it all.
  • In Counselor Troi as Chief Counselor for the Enterprise, we see the quintessential ISFJ. As both a counselor and an empath, she specializes in interpreting the emotions of others through the use of her introverted sensing preferences and relies on her extraverted feeling preference to expertly communicate her understanding of the emotional needs and desires of others. This type is both patient and thorough but they can become reserved and obsessive when stressed leading others to sometimes see them self-centered and uncompromising.
  • Second in command of the Enterprise, Commander Will Riker is an ESTP. This type loves to be where the action is. They are decisive, energetic and have the social presence to be effective in a variety of situations. However, they can be seen as noncommittal and detached. After all, it did take Commander Riker well over a decade to finally marry Counselor Troi. They can also appear opportunistic and restless during times of stress.
  • When Neelix appointed himself the Chief Morale Office of Voyager it was exactly the kind of move we would expect from an ESFP. This type is the consummate people person always seeking to be the life of the party. Their strengths like in their inclusiveness and how easily they are able to engage others. Thus, it’s no surprise that they like working in teams. However, they can be seen as ineffective and undependable in times of stress.
  • Lt Commander Geordi LaForge is the Enterprise’s Chief Engineer and he’s also an ISTP. He is as bright, creative and effective at problem solving as his counterpart on Voyager but unlike Lt. Torres, Geordi is an introvert. That makes this type highly engaged in areas that interest them but can make them socially awkward as well. They are people of few words that are easy to misread and they can become restless and nonconforming when stressed.
  • Ensign Wesley Crusher is an ISFP. He inherited his resourcefulness and people skills from his mother, Dr. Beverly Crusher but as an introverted feeling type and extraverted sensing type, he is more reflective. This type will encourage others to act but prefers to do so behind the scenes. They demonstrate their feelings by attending to the details that matter to others. They are good at managing up to their bosses and down to their direct reports but may have difficulty with their peers. They can also become skeptical and touchy when stressed.
  • The ENTJ is considered a natural leader and Voyager’s Captain Janeway illustrates why. Like others of this type she displays that perfect blend of idealism and logic, independence and external orientation. This type is confident and intellectual but can be seen as demanding and condescending when stressed. And while they are extraverts, their keen wit and self-assured manner can cause them to overestimate their interpersonal skills.
  • Voyager’s Lt Paris demonstrates the appeal of the ENTP. This type loves a good debate. They are outspoken, inventive and capable of making valuable contributions to a team. Always willing to take on a challenge, they see opportunities everywhere. But they can become impulsive and distracted when stressed. They can also be seen as abrupt, insensitive and not a team player when they are not showing their best selves.
  • Seven of Nine was once part of the Borg collective. Now like most INTP’s she prefers solving problems on her own. This type loves complex challenges and uses their talent for conceptualization, analysis and unconventionality to arrive at imaginative solutions. Their strong intellect, quick wit and introverted nature can cause them to become restless and defensive when stressed. As a result they are sometimes seen as being poor at interpersonal relations and team work. They can also be rebellious when frustrated.
  • ENFJ’s like Kes bring heart to any situation. They are excellent at developing relationships because they use an appreciative and supportive approach to engaging others. Charming, Popular and Outgoing others naturally gravitate toward them although they rarely wait for that to happen. Under stress they can become pushy and impulsive and their keen sensibilities can sometimes put them at odds with upper management.
  • Voyager’s first officer, Commander Chakotay reflects the reflective, idealistic and calm demeanor of the INFP. These types project their creativity and are good at generating hospitable work climates. They are compassionate bridge builders but can sometimes be too reserved, appearing to others as guarded, dogmatic and opinionated.
  • Voyager’s Ensign Kim is the extraverted counterpart to Cmdr Chakotay. Like INFPs, ENFPs are driven by possibilities and are good at building relationships. They are warm and enthusiastic and are great at expressing compassion and empathy. But they can become distracted and overly talkative when stressed. They are also sometimes seen as overly dependent and hypersensitive.
  • It may seem like an oxymoron to assign a personality type to an android, but Data’s precision when coupled with his fascination with humanity results in many of the characteristics we see in INFJs. This type will work relentlessly towards a goal. They can be forceful and determined when necessary but are also attentive and appreciative of others and are particularly interested in establishing enduring relationships. Under stress they can become intense and reserved and their focus on information can come across as a disregard for others, while leading them to set unrealistic expectations.
  • Lastly, there is probably no better example of the ideal leader than Captain Jean Luc Picard, commanding officer of Star Fleet’s flagship the U.S.S. Enterprise. This INTJ is a visionary who can see the big picture while also understanding the difficulty of getting others to buy into it. INTJs are original, strategic, confident and cerebral. Their penetrating intellect makes them adept problem solvers. When stressed their intelligence and reserved demeanor can make them appear condescending and opinionated. However, in Captain Picard we see this type’s potential for wisdom and exemplary leadership effectiveness. We have now seen prototypes of all sixteen Myers Briggs Types represented in leadership positions, thanks to our friends at Star Fleet.



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