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Midgley Interoperability US Dept of Ed

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  • 1. Steve Midgley Deputy Director Office of Education Technology US Department of Education
  • 2. Context Process Content
  • 3. Context
  • 4.
    • “ By 2020, America will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world.”
    • President Obama
  • 5. Process
  • 6.
    • “ I can't create my future with the tools from your past.”
    Middle school student Second Life Session
  • 7.
    • National Education Technology Plan
      • Learning
      • Teaching
      • Assessment
      • Infrastructure
      • Productivity
    • National Broadband Plan
      • Digital Learning and Content
      • Better Data
      • Improved Infrastructure
  • 8. Challenges
    • Educational technology market suffers from “a classic market failure . . . that discourages private industry from heavily investing in basic research to exploit emerging information technologies for learning”
    • -- Federation of American Scientists
    • Education markets are “notoriously difficult to enter [because] they are highly fragmented and often highly political.”
    • -- Henry Kelly
  • 9. Opportunities
    • Billions of dollars spent on educational materials, technology and assessments each year.
    • Millions of learning objects, primary source materials and other resources housed in Federal repositories today.
    • Thousands of educational Communities of Practice operating online around the world.
    • Hundreds of commercial and non-profit organizations working with digital resources and online learning today.
  • 10.
    • “ The Answer” doesn’t exist
    • Solutions will be assembled from everywhere
            • Federal initiatives
            • Industry innovation
            • State and local policy and practice
            • Non-profits and reform support organizations
    Learning Registry Hi, That’s Us!
  • 11.
    • Everyone should be able to find “our stuff”
    • Other people should be able to comment on our stuff
    • We shouldn’t intermediate communication or use: “No gatekeepers”
    • We should encourage others settle on a solution
    • We shouldn’t be the only node on the network
    • We shouldn’t reinvent the wheel
    • Our stuff is free, but we should make room for-sale
    Federal Needs
  • 12. Accelerating Change
    • Q: What accelerates and strengthens growth of a network?
    • A: Value
    • Q: Where does value come from?
    • A: Functionality and Participation
    • Q: Can you build participation without functionality?
    • A: ?
    • Suggested reading: Benkler, Wealth of Networks & Christenson, Disrupting Class
  • 13. Content
  • 14. Network Functionality: keep it simple
    • What should a content network do?
    • “ Help me find stuff”
    • “ Let me share stuff”
    • “ Allow me to participate”
  • 15. Network Functionality: objectives
    • Provide services: permit innovation
    • Let everyone participate
    • No default “winners”
    • Everyone can provide info on anything
    • Identity exists
    • Re-aggregation is natural
    • Usage/utility is shared
  • 16. Network Brawn Brain
  • 17. Network Stack
  • 18. Content Sources
    • Dept of Energy, Treasury, National Science Foundation, NASA, NOAA, Smithsonian, National Archives, Library of Congress, Education, and more
    • Publishers, School Districts, States, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Public Broadcasting System, Entrepreneurs, Broadcasters, NGO’s, Teachers
  • 19. Don’t re-invent the wheel, but axle grease welcome
    • International and NGO
    • EU: Globe, European SchoolNet, Ariadne
    • Australia
    • OERCommons, NYLearns, many others
    • Private Sector
    • IMS/Jess & co, Academic Benchmarks, many others
    • States / Local
    • California, Indiana, many others
  • 20. Advanced Learning Systems: Capabilities
    • Single sign on & identity management
    • Purchasing and license acquisition is easy
    • Re-using, re-mixing, re-purposing is easy (or even possible)
    • Communities can exist and find each other
    • Users control their data and privacy (no more stovepipes)
    • Instrumentation: it’s possible to see the bigger picture
    • Multiple voices (aka meta-data)
    • Diverse relevance and recommendation sources
    • Value is intensified by diverse parties
  • 21. Interoperability Needs
    • Lightweight
    • Open access and derivation
    • Transparent community
    • Opt-in & self-assembling
    • Easy “on-ramp”
    • Simple use-cases have simple implementations
    • Workflow is handled but not required
    • De-coupled transport
    • Open reference implementations & testing harnesses
    • Uses existing standards
    • Federated identity of resources (plus ancestry!)
    • Federated discovery (and therefore relevancy is too)
    • Semantic tuples? Something else?
  • 22. Open Government (that’s you) Participation Welcome (and needed)
  • 23. www.ed.gov/technology [email_address]