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Online Learning in K-12 Schools
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Online Learning in K-12 Schools

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Online Learning in K-12 Schools

Online Learning in K-12 Schools

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Online Learning in K-12 Schools Online Learning in K-12 Schools Presentation Transcript

  • Online Learning in K-12 Schools Douglas S. Gauld Walden University  Rachel Bordelon EDUC-6715I-9 New and Emerging Technologies March 25, 2011
  • Why do we need online learning?
    • Instructional Gaps in Traditional Schooling
    • Remediation for regular curriculum classes
    • Supplementary test preparation
    • Career training
    • Extracurricular activities
    (Image source: http://www.maniacworld.com/flash-chess.jpg) (Image Source: http://www.foggiest.net/pmwiki/uploads/Fog/circuitboard2.jpg)
  • Why do we need online learning?
    • Instructional Gaps in Traditional Schooling
    • AP and IB classes not offered by the school
    • Enhancement for students wishing to explore interesting topics beyond regular class study
    • Electives not offered by the school
    (Image source: http://findingschools.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/ib_logo-300x293.jpg) (Image Source: http://www.stjacademy.org/uploaded/photos/Beyond_The_Academy/AP_Logo.JPG?1271272332314) ( http://www.pamojaeducation.com/ ) (Image Source: http://www.waterloowi.us/comm/images/theater-big.gif)
  • Online Learning Modules
    • Online learning is a growing field, so online learning systems have many names and take many forms.
    • Online Learning Modules (OLM)
    • Course Management Systems (CMS)
    • Learning Management Systems (LMS)
    • Virtual Learning Environments (VLE)
    • Education Management System (EMS)
    • ( http://moodle.org/ , http://www.rcampus.com/ )
  • Online Learning Programs
    • State Funded Virtual Schools
      • Utah Electronic High School (35,000 enrollments in 2004-05)
      • Florida Virtual School (33,000 enrollments in 2004-2005)
    • Local, State, or Regional Online Learning Consortia
    • College and University Programs
    • Virtual Charter Schools
    • Local School Distance Learning
    • Online Private Schools
    • (Cavanaugh & Clark, 2007)
  • What’s so great about Online Learning?
    • Online learning modules support meaningful, authentic learning by:
    • Offering supplements to in-school courses or free-standing full courses (Cavanaugh & Clark, 2007)
    • Fostering participatory learning through real-time or threaded asynchronous dialogue
    • Fostering collaboration among geographically remote schools and peers (Gillard & Bailey, 2007)
    • Enabling individualized instruction tailored to meet learners’ unique learning styles, interests, and proclivities (Lever-Duffy & McDonald, 2008; Tomlinson, 2009)
    (Image Source: http://sws-corp.com/cm/images/stories/support.gif)
  • What’s so great about Online Learning?
    • Online learning modules support meaningful, authentic learning by:
    • Helping students and teachers organize schedules, assignments, and records
    • Supporting students’ active engagement in their own learning (Gillard & Bailey, 2007)
    • Teaching students the skills of learning through authentic problem and project-based learning experiences in which they independently and collaboratively construct knowledge and artifacts of understanding (Lever-Duffy & McDonald, 2008; Han & Bhattacharya, 2001)
    (Image Source: http://sws-corp.com/cm/images/stories/support.gif)
  • Yes, but… “ Doesn’t setting up online learning require advanced computer skills?” No. Many online Learning Modules are easy to use, requiring the same skills as popular word-processing, presentation, and browsing software. YouTube is a great source for tutorials on how to install and use these programs. (Image Source: http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumblarge_328/1225469039Ou1LyM.jpg) No. Many online Learning Modules are easy to use, requiring the same skills as popular word-processing, presentation, and browsing software. YouTube is a great source for tutorials on how to install and use these programs.
  • Yes, but… “ What is this going to cost?” Although large-scale online learning ventures may need more sophisticated hosting through pay services, teachers can easily create classes using services like Moodle or Rcampus for free. (Image Source: http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumblarge_328/1225469039Ou1LyM.jpg)
  • Yes, but… “ What if my students do not have computer or Internet access?” (Image Source: http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumblarge_328/1225469039Ou1LyM.jpg) (Image Source: http://www.ebr.lib.la.us/teens/images/computer%20monitor%20and%20books%20use%20this%20one.jpg) Access can still be still a problem in the United States. Some students can get online at local public libraries or using school computers. Unfortunately, every case is different, so accommodations must be tailored to individual circumstances. Access can still be still a problem in the United States. Some students can get online at local public libraries or using school computers. Unfortunately, every case is different, so accommodations must be tailored to individual circumstances.
  • Yes, but… “ Can e-learning courses be accredited?” Many systems have already developed fully accredited e-learning courses that meet the standards for their regions. And, according to Cavanaugh and Clark (2007) organizations such as the Council for Trans-Regional Accreditation are developing standards for inter-region accreditation. (Image Source: http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumblarge_328/1225469039Ou1LyM.jpg) (Image Source: http://www.stcsig.org/canadian/images/UniversityCap_Diploma.jpg)
  • Yes, but… Students who do well with online learning possess many of the same characteristics as their successful peers in brick-and-mortar settings: motivation, discipline, and academic skill. Students with abstract reasoning and reflective observation skills seem to do better than those who require hands-on experience and experimentation (Cavanaugh & Clark, 2007). “ Can my students handle e-learning?” Students who do well with online learning possess many of the same characteristics as their successful peers in brick-and-mortar settings: motivation, discipline, and academic skill. Students with abstract reasoning and reflective observation skills seem to do better than those who require hands-on experience and experimentation (Cavanaugh & Clark, 2007). (Image Source: http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumblarge_328/1225469039Ou1LyM.jpg) (Image Source: http://www.stcsig.org/canadian/images/UniversityCap_Diploma.jpg)
  • Yes, but… “ What about those students who need more supervision and concrete experience?” Improvements in technology will increasingly address these limitations. Meanwhile, teachers can help students thrive in online learning environments by designing highly structured courses in which collaboration, communication, project and problem-based learning, and learning tools like virtual manipulatives and video conferencing help keep students focused and involved. (Image Source: http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumblarge_328/1225469039Ou1LyM.jpg)
  • References
    • Cavanaugh, C., & Clark, T. (2007). The Landscape of K-12 Online Learning. In P. Adamson, B. Adamson, & N. Clausen-Grace, et al (Eds.), What Works in K-12 Online Learning (Chapter 1, pp. 5-19) . Eugene, OR: International Society for Technology in Education.
    • Gillard, S., & Bailey, D. (2007). Technology in the classroom: Overcoming obstacles, reaping rewards. The International Journal of Learning , 14 (1), 87–93.
    • Han, S., and Bhattacharya, K. (2001). Constructionism, Learning by Design, and Project Based Learning. In M. Orey (Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology. Retrieved , from http://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/
    • Lever-Duffy, J. and McDonald, J. (2008). Theoretical Foundations. In Teaching and Learning with Technology (3rd ed. pp. 2–35 ). Boston: Pearson.