Boston’s “Big Dig” & the Creation of the Artery Business Committee<br />Rick Dimino<br />President & CEO, A Better City<br />
The Artery Business Committee<br />Served as the independent eyes, ear and voice of Greater Boston’s business community in...
“Big Dig” basics<br />Largest civic engineering project in history of the United States<br />There are 160 miles of lane; ...
Why undertake a mammoth of a project like the Big Dig? <br />
Highway created an urban Scar<br />
Big Dig back storyconstruction & demolition of an elevated highway<br />In the 1940’s, Boston city planners proposed const...
Construction continued for seven years….<br />1954, highway isolates North End from rest of City<br />1954, facing South t...
190,000 Vehicles<br />
By 1980’s process in motion to bury Artery<br />
Turnpike Authority’s role<br />City of Boston’s role <br /><ul><li>Supported traffic management
Participated in outreach efforts
Created designated staff positions specifically for Artery work; this was funded by the Project
Managed the design, construction, utility relocation, and construction mitigation
Worked with the City of Boston and ABC to manage traffic impacts
Managed neighborhood outreach process</li></li></ul><li>ABC’s role<br /><ul><li>Involved in all aspects of CA/T work repre...
Ensured continued support by engaging membership in planning process
Minimized construction impacts
Conducted independent analysis and recommended actions to the Project and City
Resolved project-threatening controversies by mediating disputes between City and Project
Monitored and evaluated performance of the CA/T project, City of Boston and construction contractors</li></li></ul><li>ABC...
ABC gave voice to local business community<br />“In a dispute between the city and the state over the <br />city’s request...
Managing utilities<br /><ul><li>Over 29 miles of utility lines were relocated
The utilities took the opportunity to upgrade their underground facilities
ABC’s Utility Relocation Subcommittee
1991 – 1992: ABC provided forum for Project and the utilities to develop the “Maintenance of Utilities Plan”
The Project conducted a series of drills to test notification and response procedures.</li></li></ul><li>Integrating Mitig...
ABC Construction Mitigation and Utility Relocation Subcommittees reviewed and commented on the content of contracts
1993 - Project and the City invites ABC to participate in weekly workshops before construction contracts were advertised f...
Government & Management<br /><ul><li>Centralize oversight
Develop Human Resource capacity
Establish a Project Management team
New Teams/Niche Organization
Define partnerships and lines of accountability
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Rick presentation about central artery for stephaine pollocks class

  1. 1. Boston’s “Big Dig” & the Creation of the Artery Business Committee<br />Rick Dimino<br />President & CEO, A Better City<br />
  2. 2. The Artery Business Committee<br />Served as the independent eyes, ear and voice of Greater Boston’s business community in relation to the Central Artery/Tunnel Project<br />Was a coalition of executives who shared a strong commitment to a timely completion of America’s largest and most complex public works development<br />Worked to ensure that downtown Boston stayed open for business during construction<br />
  3. 3. “Big Dig” basics<br />Largest civic engineering project in history of the United States<br />There are 160 miles of lane; this completes the I-90 corridor spanning from the Atlantic to Pacific oceans<br />Total length of project is 18,480 feet; approximately 3.5 miles<br />Complete cost estimates exceed $14.6 billion<br />Construction began in 1991 and ended in 2006<br />Project improved access to Logan International Airport<br />Increased interstate capacity and decreased travel time<br />Provides opportunity for further economic growth by making downtown core and accessible destination point<br />Created approximately 200 acres of open space<br />
  4. 4. Why undertake a mammoth of a project like the Big Dig? <br />
  5. 5. Highway created an urban Scar<br />
  6. 6. Big Dig back storyconstruction & demolition of an elevated highway<br />In the 1940’s, Boston city planners proposed constructing a centrally located, elevated highway as a way to alleviate chronic automobile congestion present in the downtown core<br />1951, demolition begins as buildings are leveled to make way for the highway<br />1,000+ buildings torn down<br />20,000 residents displaced<br />Elevated roadway completed in 1958<br />Project intact for 20+ years and then in the early 80’s urban design conversation shifts towards leveling the roadway and placing infrastructure underground<br />
  7. 7. Construction continued for seven years….<br />1954, highway isolates North End from rest of City<br />1954, facing South toward Atlantic Avenue; concrete piers in place to support a six-lane elevated highway<br />Project hailed as solution to Boston’s traffic problems<br />
  8. 8.
  9. 9. 190,000 Vehicles<br />
  10. 10. By 1980’s process in motion to bury Artery<br />
  11. 11. Turnpike Authority’s role<br />City of Boston’s role <br /><ul><li>Supported traffic management
  12. 12. Participated in outreach efforts
  13. 13. Created designated staff positions specifically for Artery work; this was funded by the Project
  14. 14. Managed the design, construction, utility relocation, and construction mitigation
  15. 15. Worked with the City of Boston and ABC to manage traffic impacts
  16. 16. Managed neighborhood outreach process</li></li></ul><li>ABC’s role<br /><ul><li>Involved in all aspects of CA/T work representing the large downtown business members; thereby assisting in improving project plans
  17. 17. Ensured continued support by engaging membership in planning process
  18. 18. Minimized construction impacts
  19. 19. Conducted independent analysis and recommended actions to the Project and City
  20. 20. Resolved project-threatening controversies by mediating disputes between City and Project
  21. 21. Monitored and evaluated performance of the CA/T project, City of Boston and construction contractors</li></li></ul><li>ABC offered a reputable, non-partisan perspective on civic issues during a time when there wasn’t strong representation from local businesses<br /><ul><li>By the late 1980’s, the business community was diffused and the major players were no longer present</li></ul>“The Chamber’s interest and influence on urban<br />development issues had been waning for many years. <br />The retailers that once made up it’s core membership <br />drew an increasingly large share of sales from outside <br />the center city, and in some cases, were now owned <br />by out-of-state firms…. Before, when the City or the <br />State wanted to raise money, they had to go to the <br />Bank of Boston. Now they go to Wall Street.” <br />--Civic Leadership and The Big Dig<br />
  22. 22. ABC gave voice to local business community<br />“In a dispute between the city and the state over the <br />city’s request that the state add a downtown off-<br />ramp, ABC issued a report that helped them develop <br />a reputation as an impartial group. The report, in <br />the words of a Boston Globe editorial, made <br />recommendations that were -not just an opinion, but <br />a reasoned analysis-”<br /> --Civic Leadership and The Big Dig<br />
  23. 23. Managing utilities<br /><ul><li>Over 29 miles of utility lines were relocated
  24. 24. The utilities took the opportunity to upgrade their underground facilities
  25. 25. ABC’s Utility Relocation Subcommittee
  26. 26. 1991 – 1992: ABC provided forum for Project and the utilities to develop the “Maintenance of Utilities Plan”
  27. 27. The Project conducted a series of drills to test notification and response procedures.</li></li></ul><li>Integrating Mitigation<br />Including design & construction<br /><ul><li>The Project worked with ABC and abutters to develop programs to protect property; maintain access; control dust, noise, vibration, and rodents; and provide a safe and inviting pedestrian environment
  28. 28. ABC Construction Mitigation and Utility Relocation Subcommittees reviewed and commented on the content of contracts
  29. 29. 1993 - Project and the City invites ABC to participate in weekly workshops before construction contracts were advertised for bids to review the recommended traffic phases related to construction steps</li></li></ul><li>Never underestimate the power of public outreach<br />
  30. 30. Government & Management<br /><ul><li>Centralize oversight
  31. 31. Develop Human Resource capacity
  32. 32. Establish a Project Management team
  33. 33. New Teams/Niche Organization
  34. 34. Define partnerships and lines of accountability
  35. 35. Measure performance</li></li></ul><li>Phasing is a critical tool<br /><ul><li>Highway construction and openings synchronized to minimize impact
  36. 36. Phasing called for completion of the South Boston Haul Road and the Third Harbor Tunnel first
  37. 37. Learned and applied lessons from this work before major construction activity began Downtown
  38. 38. Utility relocation work preceded heavy mainline construction </li></li></ul><li>Establish district-wide mobility plan<br /><ul><li>Highway construction and openings synchronized to minimize impact
  39. 39. Developed a Coordinated Traffic Management Program
  40. 40. Access Criteria
  41. 41. Develop an overall plan document and established workshops/task forces
  42. 42. “Interim Operations Center” established to monitor traffic performance
  43. 43. Project and the City convened multi-week task forces to evaluate implementation steps required to complete a major change
  44. 44. Established a communications and control center to monitor the implementation of changes</li></li></ul><li>Designing with the future in mind<br /><ul><li>Infrastructure has public finishes
  45. 45. Urban design and architectural guidelines
  46. 46. The Surface Transportation Action Forum (STAF)</li></li></ul><li>Project transformed the city’s identity from “highway” to “district/ neighborhood”<br />
  47. 47. Time and Money Savings<br /><ul><li>Average travel times from the I-90/ I-93 interchange to Logan Airport during peak periods have decreased between 42% and 74%; 800,000 additional residents connected to airport
  48. 48. Average afternoon peak hour northbound travel time on I-93 through downtown has dropped from 19.5 minutes to 2.8 minutes
  49. 49. Prior to the project, I-93 Northbound average traffic speed was 10mph, today it is 43 MPH
  50. 50. Speed for all harbor tunnels went from 13 MPH to 36 MPH
  51. 51. Storrow Drive Eastbound to I-93 North travel speed increased from 4mph to 21 mph
  52. 52. The improved highway, bridge and tunnel network provides $168 million annually in time and cost saving for travelers</li></ul>--Economic Impacts of the Mass Turnpike Authority and the Central Artery/ <br /> Third Harbor Tunnel Project<br />
  53. 53. Building transportation networks is about economic growth<br />Completion of the Central Artery/ Tunnel Project =<br /><ul><li>$7 billion in private investment
  54. 54. 7,700 new housing units
  55. 55. 1,000 affordable housing units
  56. 56. 10 million square feet of office and retail space
  57. 57. 2,600 hotel rooms
  58. 58. 43,000 jobs</li></ul>--Economic Impacts of the Mass Turnpike Authority and the Central Artery/ Third Harbor Tunnel Project<br />
  59. 59. Lessons LearnedABC played a major role in<br />Minimizing construction impacts<br />Improving project plans<br />Resolving project-threatening controversies<br />Securing needed funding<br />Ensuring continued support<br />Undertaking needed planning <br /> --Civic Leadership and The Big Dig<br />
  60. 60. ABC’s success due to<br />A Unique project<br />Significant resources<br />Responsiveness and staying power<br />Multifaceted focus<br />Flexible tactics<br />--Civic Leadership and The Big Dig<br />
  61. 61.
  62. 62.
  63. 63. Inviting public space<br />
  64. 64. Reconnecting the city by creating pedestrian friendly places<br />
  65. 65. Mayor Menino’s Crossroads Initiative<br />
  66. 66. Transitioning to A Better City<br />Independent, membership-based organization that improves the economic competitiveness & quality of life of the Boston region<br />Mobilizes the business community and collaborates with both the civic and government sectors<br />A combined focus on transportation, land development and the environment is paramount in ABC’s approach to economic growth<br />
  67. 67. Demonstrated Leadership<br />Founded in 1989, one of the region’s most influential planning, research and project-based organizations<br />Played a major role in shaping the Boston area’s new central highway network, open spaces and transportation system<br />Focused on enhancing the viability of the City’s existing infrastructure; committed to major public realm, economic growth and sustainability initiatives<br />
  68. 68. Committed to Collaboration<br />Board is compromised of over 100 leaders from Boston’s financial services, hospitality & tourism, cultural institutions, construction, higher education, health care, life sciences, real estate and environmental services <br />Diversity of industries and expertise positions ABC to lend valuable private sector support and advice<br />

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