TOOLS FOR POLICY IMPACT      POLICY ENTREPRENEURSHIP          Maurice Bolo, PhDBolo@scinnovent.org / ochibolo@gmail.com
TYPES OF POLICY ENTREPRENEURSFour broad styles exist:  •Story-tellers  •Networkers  •Engineers  •Fixers    Which one are y...
WHICH KIND OF POLICY ENTREPRENEUR ARE YOU?Based on a self assessment questionnairedeveloped by the ODIHelps you to capital...
WHAT ARE THE RESULTS?•A low score indicates that you make extensive useof a particular style of entrepreneurship•A high sc...
WHAT ARE THE RESULTS?For all the questions:•Answers for (a) correspond to story-teller•Answers for (b) correspond to netwo...
STORY-TELLERS•Story-telling is important for changing policy•Policy makers make sense of complex realitiesthrough simplifi...
NETWORKERS•Policymaking takes place within communities ofpeople who know and interact with each other•To influence policym...
ENGINEERS•There often can be a huge gap between whatpolicy makers think they are doing and whatactually happens on the gro...
THE FIXERS•This is about understanding the policy andpolitical process•Knowing when to make your pitch and towhom•You need...
www.scinnovent.org
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Policy entrepreneurship in influencing policy change [compatibility mode]

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Presentation by Dr. Maurice Bolo of the Scinnovent Centre during the training on The Art of Influencing Policy Change: tools and strategies for researchers, held on 12-13 February 2013

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Policy entrepreneurship in influencing policy change [compatibility mode]

  1. 1. TOOLS FOR POLICY IMPACT POLICY ENTREPRENEURSHIP Maurice Bolo, PhDBolo@scinnovent.org / ochibolo@gmail.com
  2. 2. TYPES OF POLICY ENTREPRENEURSFour broad styles exist: •Story-tellers •Networkers •Engineers •Fixers Which one are you?
  3. 3. WHICH KIND OF POLICY ENTREPRENEUR ARE YOU?Based on a self assessment questionnairedeveloped by the ODIHelps you to capitalize on your strengths;develop your weaknesses and improve thepolicy impact of your workTake the assessment now
  4. 4. WHAT ARE THE RESULTS?•A low score indicates that you make extensive useof a particular style of entrepreneurship•A high score indicates that you make little use of aparticular style•Most people use all the four different styles atdifferent times•It is not necessary to be adept at every style•However, under –use/over-use may mean that youneed to re-balance your styles or find partners withcompensating strengths
  5. 5. WHAT ARE THE RESULTS?For all the questions:•Answers for (a) correspond to story-teller•Answers for (b) correspond to networker•Answers for (c) correspond to engineer•Answers for (d) correspond to fixer –A score of 37 means you use them equally –For each type less than 30 is low; less than 23 is very low –For each, more than 44 is high; more than 52 is very high –Remember, the total of your scores should be 150
  6. 6. STORY-TELLERS•Story-telling is important for changing policy•Policy makers make sense of complex realitiesthrough simplified stories/scenarios •NB: sometimes narratives can be misleading and counter-narratives always emerge...but this doesn’t diminish the importance of narratives in shaping policy•Some powerful narratives in the past include:structural adjustment; debt relief as the answer topoverty reduction; aid-for-trade etc•Successful policy entrepreneurs need to be goodstory-tellers
  7. 7. NETWORKERS•Policymaking takes place within communities ofpeople who know and interact with each other•To influence policymakers, you need to join theirnetworks•You are either inside the tent or outside•If you are inside, your voice will be heard, if you areoutside, you will not be heard•Researchers who are good networkers are morelikely to influence policy than those who are not
  8. 8. ENGINEERS•There often can be a huge gap between whatpolicy makers think they are doing and whatactually happens on the ground•Researchers need to work not just withsenior level policymakers but also with ‘streetlevel bureaucrats’•Researchers need to become practicallyinvolved in testing their ideas if they expectpolicymakers to heed their recommendations
  9. 9. THE FIXERS•This is about understanding the policy andpolitical process•Knowing when to make your pitch and towhom•You need to know your source of power: Physical power; resource power; position power; expert power; personal power etc ......Then exploit it
  10. 10. www.scinnovent.org

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