Courtly Love and Romance
Literature
A quick review
Romance Literature
• Romance-when you hear the word, you
probably think about love; however, that is
not where the word or...
Romance languages:
• The romance languages include French,
Italian, Spanish, Latin, and Portuguese.
• Romance literature b...
Women’s influence on romance
literature
• This literature was written primarily for the
interest of the women in court, wh...
Royal Women
• Eleanor of Aquitaine:
Queen of France and
then of England, along
with her daughter Marie,
both had a strong
...
Courtly Love
• Troubador Poetry-written for the women of court
and depicted the style of courtly love they
preferred. Wome...
Favors
• The ladies of court would encourage the
knights to perform noble deeds and often
gave them tokens to herald them ...
The grim reality
• The reality of the times was that marriages were not
performed or entered into because of love, but
rat...
Romance?
• Women of the court may have been more
entertained by the thought of romantic love
due to the lack of it in thei...
Works cited
Eleanor of Aquitaine: Eleanor marrying Louis VII of France, 1137. Photograph.
Encyclopædia Britannica Online. ...
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Courtly love and romance literature

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ELA: What is courtly love and how did it influence the Medieval writers?

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Courtly love and romance literature

  1. 1. Courtly Love and Romance Literature A quick review
  2. 2. Romance Literature • Romance-when you hear the word, you probably think about love; however, that is not where the word originated. • It was taken from the French romanz, and referred to the Latin language spoken by the Romans. • French and many other languages were derived from the Latin, hence, romance languages.
  3. 3. Romance languages: • The romance languages include French, Italian, Spanish, Latin, and Portuguese. • Romance literature became synonymous with specific literature written in the French vernacular language, commonly spoken at court. It also reflected the culture of the court.
  4. 4. Women’s influence on romance literature • This literature was written primarily for the interest of the women in court, who were interested in the roles of women in such stories.
  5. 5. Royal Women • Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen of France and then of England, along with her daughter Marie, both had a strong interest in music, poetry and the arts. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Eleanor marrying Louis VII of France
  6. 6. Courtly Love • Troubador Poetry-written for the women of court and depicted the style of courtly love they preferred. Women were usually older than the knight or lord who performed the deeds and the love won was strictly plutonic. • The knight was subjected and loyal to the king, and in turn, was also expected to show the same affections for the queen, ladies, and dames at court. Unfortunately, this was only done in the poetry, not in reality.
  7. 7. Favors • The ladies of court would encourage the knights to perform noble deeds and often gave them tokens to herald them on to complete the task, thus winning her “love”.
  8. 8. The grim reality • The reality of the times was that marriages were not performed or entered into because of love, but rather because of strategic planning. Young women were betrothed to the man who would bring her status and security, and men would look to inherit land, properties, and titles by marrying the woman.
  9. 9. Romance? • Women of the court may have been more entertained by the thought of romantic love due to the lack of it in their real lives. Some theorize that it serves as a model for young lords who are not yet married, so as to behave in a way fitting their station in life.
  10. 10. Works cited Eleanor of Aquitaine: Eleanor marrying Louis VII of France, 1137. Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Web. 26 Mar.2011. "Troubadours & The Beloved."Re-Vision Radio. The Gypsy Scholar, n.d. Web. 26 Mar. 2011. <www.revradiotowerofsong.org/9philosoquestromance.html >.

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