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Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
Sensory memory
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Sensory memory

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  • 1. B. Sensory Memory: Recording <br />
  • 2. What is SENSORY ?<br />
  • 3. What are 2 Forms of Sensory memory? <br />Ionic memory<br />Echoic memory <br />
  • 4. 2 Forms of Sensory <br />Ionic memory – holds visual information for about a one third of a second or more.<br />Example: blinking of the eye. <br />
  • 5.  Echoic memory – holds auditory information for 1 or 2 seconds. <br />
  • 6. Example:<br />A less scientific demonstration of echoic memory is the "What did you say?" phenomenon, which goes like this:<br />Person #1: "What time is it?"<br />Person #2: "What did you say? Oh, 2:30."<br />The second person hears the question after asking, "What did you say?" This is due to echoic memory, which holds the sound of the question for a second or two. Even if you were not paying attention to the words when they were uttered, you can "hear" them when you turn your attention to them. “<br />
  • 7. Example:<br />
  • 8. 1 Prevents being overwhelmed.<br />It keeps you from being overwhelmed by too many incoming stimuli (information). <br />Why sensory memory avoid stimulus to overload? <br />Preventing incoming information to vanished.<br />Function of Sensory Memory<br />
  • 9. 2 Gives decision time.<br />It gives you to decide whether information is important. Information you pay attention will automatically transferred to short term memory.<br />
  • 10. 3 Provides stability, playback and recognition.<br /> Iconic memory plays back visual information. Echoic memory plays back auditory information.<br /> <br />
  • 11. INFO:<br />Sensory memory allows us to take a 'snapshot' of our environment, and to store this information for a short period. Only information that is transferred to another level of memory will be preserved for more than 1 à two seconds.<br />
  • 12. C. Short term Memory: Working<br />Short-term memory- holds a limited amount of information –an average of seven items-for a limited period of time - 2 to 30 seconds..<br />
  • 13. Chunking- is combining separate items of information into a larger unit, or chunk.<br />Example: When recalling a number such as 14101946, group the numbers as 14, 10, and 1946, to create a mnemonic for this number as a date, month, and year.<br />
  • 14. Interference results – when new information enters short term memory and pushes out information that’s already there.<br />Example: You are trying to remember a phone number and someone ask you a question, the question interfere s with or wipes away the phone number.x<br />
  • 15. Function of Short Term Memory<br />1 Attending- to paying attention to information that is relevant and disregards everything else.<br />
  • 16. 2 Rehearsing- holds information for a short period of time until you decide what to do.<br />
  • 17. 3 Storing- to store or encode information in long-term..<br />

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