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Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites
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Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internet's Most Popular Sites

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Google, Twitter, and Wikipedia are consistently in the Top 10 most visited sites on the Internet, but each is much more than a simple destination. All three have great potential for providing …

Google, Twitter, and Wikipedia are consistently in the Top 10 most visited sites on the Internet, but each is much more than a simple destination. All three have great potential for providing reference assistance to patrons, keeping up-to-date on current events and trends, and sharing your expertise with the wider world. This program will share ideas on how to take an active role in each of these resources and how to get the most out of each one. (Presented at the Ohio Library Council N, NE, and NW Chapter Conferences 2013)

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  • Welcome to “Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying: Utilizing (and Participating in) the Internet’s Most Popular Sites.”
  • My name is Don Boozer, and I am the Statewide Coordinator for KnowItNow24x7. As coordinator of Ohio’s virtual reference service, I have a vested interest in encouraging librarians to constantly hone their reference skills and be curious about learning new strategies. I don’t have any handouts, but the slides from this presentation are posted on my slideshare site. Today, I hope to share **at least** one new thing you didn’t know you could do with Google, Twitter, and Wikipedia that you can take back to your library and share with your fellow staff members. Towards that end…
  • First, let’s understand who we’re dealing with. Although Google, Twitter, and Wikipedia are three of the most popular sites on the Internet, there are three very different organizations that make these sites available.
  • First: Google is a multi-national, for-profit corporation with more than 70 offices spread out all over the world…
  • Twitter’s offices take up three floors in a swanky office building in San Francisco with yoga space and a rooftop garden. It’s also out to make a profit…
  • And finally, the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation, which is responsible for making Wikipedia available, touts the fact that they take up the ENTIRE third floor of an office building also in San Francisco with plenty of space for its 28 local employees.
  • To get another idea of the scale that we’re talking about, let’s take a look at the operating revenue for each of these entities. Google took in over $50 billion in revenue last year. That’s over **4-1/2 TIMES** the total operating revenue of all the public libraries in the US combined… And Twitter has a small fraction compared to Google.Finally, the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation responsible for Wikipedia and other projects has about the same operating revenue as the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library’s budget.
  • One thing that many people think of when they think of Google, Twitter, and Wikipedia is that they’re FREE and are always going to be FREELY AVAILABLE. They may be free to use (and Wikipedia even has the word in its title), but there is always a cost involved somewhere.Keep in mind that Google and Twitter do *not* provide their services out of the goodness of their heart. They are *for-profit* corporations and they want to make money. We just happen to currently be able to benefit from their models for making money. If they suddenly decide to start charging for their services, shut down a service, or go out of business, there’s nothing any of us can do about it.Anyone remember Meebo? And Google Reader is going away in July, and iGoogle is being discontinued in November.So, yes, we should take advantage of **all** available resources, but keep in mind we don’t necessarily own the content and data we’re providing to these kinds of organizations when we use them.
  • Which brings us to our first topic of today’s presentation: Googling…
  • Let’s talk first about utilizing Google as a reference tool.Ya know, that logo doesn’t seem quite dramatic enough considering how Google has changed the way we do business. How about…
  • This. Okay, that’s better. Google was founded in 1998, went public in 2004, and is the #1 most visited site on the Internet according to Alexa. The company now has well-over 50,000 employees world-wide and even figures prominently in the novel “Mr. Penumbra’s 24-hour Bookstore”. It is truly a business and cultural force to be reckoned with.
  • Many times, when we think of using Google, people think “Let me google that.” In fact, “google” as a verb was officially entered into the OxfordEnglish Dictionary, Third Edition, inMarch 2006. But what we have to remember is when we want to “google it”…
  • We **really** have a range of possible searches we can do in a number of different interfaces or with a number of different delimiters. We’re going to talk about a few of these in detail, in a moment, but almost more importantly,…
  • We have to remember that Google is a constantwork-in-progress. If you know how to do something on Google today, you might have to re-learn next month or next year. Case in point,…
  • Here was a screenshot I was using for a presentation last year. Notice all those delimiters nicely arrayed along the left side.
  • Okay, now forget them. They’re not there anymore!
  • This is what the current search results screen looks like. All those delimiters have either been moved along the top or hidden away, and the frame to the right is Google’s new Knowledge Graph.
  • So, I’d like to take you through a search utilizing some of the various tools in Google’s toolbox, beginning with Image search. As some of you may know, if you click on the little camera icon in the Google Image search…
  • …and get a window asking for a URL or for you to upload an image. I wanted to try this out, so…
  • I chose this picture of a dramatic monument that I snapped a few years ago in Lakeview Cemetery in Cleveland. I had no idea who the monument was for or anything else, I just thought it looked cool. So, I wanted to see if Google Image could answer whose monument it was for me…
  • Here’s what the basic search results looked like after uploading the image. I also typed in [Lakeview Cemetery Cleveland] since I knew that was the general location. I then looked at the second row of images and found…
  • This.Hey, that looks like my photo. So, I clicked on the image and found…
  • This… It turns out that it’s the monument to Charles Brush, who was evidently “a Cleveland inventor whose original arc street light still stands at Public Square.” So, I wondered…
  • What elsecan we find out aboutCharles Brush utilizing Google? We have some keywords now: charles brush arc lamp cleveland
  • And here we find an image of the replica of Brush’s arc lamp in Cleveland.
  • An image of the man himself from Ohio History Central …
  • If I go up to “More>” and choose Patents, we can find the original patent documents for Brush’s inventions. Patents will come in handy for those Ohio Inventor reports that students come into the library asking about. You can even use images from patents if you’re looking for old-timey graphics for a project since patents.google.com provides access to patents back to the 1800s.
  • If we go again to “More>” and choose Books, we can choose the “Search Tools” and limit by only those books from the 19th Century. Each of Google’s tools will have a different set of “Search tools” associated with it. Here we find a report published by the Census in 1890 talking about Brush’s invention and that in 1879 the “first central electric lighting station using arc lamps” in San Francisco used the Brush system.While there has been some controversy over Google’s digitization of books, my perspective is that they are available to us to use as a tool, so we might as well make use of them. Some answers you will find online *only* in digitized books.
  • We also have the opportunity to use web pages not originally in English as resources as well through the use of the “Search tools”. By selecting “Translated foreign pages”The page details shows information about our friend Charles F. Brush from the SOLAR Club page of CERN, originally in German.You can also amend your search, since you see in the top image that the French, for example, translated Brush’s last name into French brosse.
  • I also wanted to try Google News. Searching for [charles brush cleveland] and clicking News…
  • And then the “Search Tools” and “Archives”…
  • I was able to find Brush’s obituary from the Schenectady Gazette dated June 17, 1929. In that, it mentions the Brush Foundation. I wondered if this was still an existing organization and found…
  • Its website hosted by the Foundation Center as well as an entry in The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History. Turns out Brush’s foundation was instrumental in forming the International Planned Parenthood Federation. So, we went from a photo of an unknown monument in Lakeview Cemetery to Planned Parenthood utilizing a number of tools available to us through Google.
  • After all that you need a cookie… Searching for “chocolate chip cookie” and choosing *Recipes* under “More” you can even limit to specific ingredients or even calorie counts.
  • So, that’s just a small sample of what you can do to get information *out* of Google. If you’re interested in becoming a better Google searcher, I recommend their Power Searching Courses (a basic and an advanced). You can also share these with patrons and in information literacy classes at your library.
  • Changing our perspective now: How can we participate in getting information into Google?
  • You should remember that by utilizing Google, you are already participating through your contribution of vast amountsof data that you’re handing over to them.
  • But I’d like to talk about “active, conscious” participation and creation of content that resides on Google’s servers. One way, of course, to participate in Google is to take advantage of Google Drive (formerly known as Google Docs). While this requires a Google account to create, it does not require one to view or edit a shared document. This can be extremely helpful when collaborating on or sharing documents or presentations.
  • Many of you are already familiar with documents, presentations, and spreadsheets if you’ve used Microsoft Office. I would like to spend a moment talking about Google Forms…
  • Here is a form created by Google Forms that I’ve posted on our KnowItNow Provider Site as an evaluation. This is what it looks like on the site to anyone viewing it…
  • Here is what that same form looks like when editing it in Google Drive…
  • And here is what the spreadsheet looks like that collects any data entered into the form from the web page it’s posted on. Forms have some templates that allow you to customize the look of the finished form, and you can set it up that you get an email every time someone enters information on the form. I can see this coming in handy for signups for classes at the library or summer reading or other places you need a quick form.
  • Sites.google.com is a simple way to create websites for a group, project, or other purpose both within as well as outside the library. Although I certainly wouldn’t recommend creating a library’s *entire* site with it!
  • Sites.google.com has a number of templates and other ways to get a site up fast.
  • By using Google’s Picasa and Panoramio, you can contribute geo-tagged photos to Google Maps and the Panoramio site itself.
  • And, of course, YouTube is now owned by Google as well and this site has been a hot-bed of content creation and public participation since 2005.
  • Blogger.com, another service owned by Google, is a quick way to get a blog (that bastion of content creation) up and running.
  • Blogger is the blog-publishing service… Blogspot is the subdomain where Blogger blogs are hosted. This is just *one* example of a blog at Blogspot.
  • And, finally, if you are a coder and developer, Google *does* provide the opportunity to participate directly in writing code collaboratively with others. If you or someone you know is a developer, this might be worth exploring. So, that is a look at what Google has to offer the user and participant.Now, we turn our attention to ….
  • Tweeting…
  • Launched in 2006, Twitter has become the 10th most-visited site on the Internet according to Alexa. Its more than 900 employees pale in comparison to its millions of regular users…
  • This screenshot shows Tweetping.net, a site that shows you Twitter traffic in real time. Each of those specks of light show where a tweet came from in just a few minutes. Twitter is a worldwide phenomenon.
  • And it really is an *excellent* tool for both *current awareness* and *professional development*. The range of people and institutions that have Twitter feeds now is huge. These three are just a teeny, tiny fraction of those that would be of use specifically to librarians…
  • And these are just a teeny, tiny fraction of other interesting and useful Twitter feeds out there. I’ve included a link to TIME Magazines 140 best twitter feeds of 2012 as a start, but if you explore Twitter you’ll find those that have useful information like book reviews, workshops, online resources, or ones that are simply fun to read. Neil deGrasse Tyson’s is one of those that does both of those things: useful and fun!It’s important to remember that No Twitter account is required to view public tweets. Just go to twitter.com/*whatever the account name is* after the @ symbol. You can bookmark these like any other site. But…
  • Twitter also provides a search interface at search.twitter.com. You can also get a fairly fine-grained list of results using their operators. For example…
  • To get an international perspective on current news, you can search for tweets from near the source of the news. Here’s a search for the term “Kim Jong Un” from Twitter feeds near the South Korean capital.
  • You can also use this same method to find out what (if anything) people are saying about your local library from their Twitter feeds. Here’s a sample search for the word “library” appearing in tweets originating from feeds within 10 miles of Columbus. While I follow OLC’s Twitter feed, I had not seen the image they posted of Doug Evans channeling his inner Dos Equis. So, I retweeted that one!
  • Now we come to another thing that you’re probably familiar with: the hashtag. The hashtag is a way to simply add your voice to an on-going conversation over Twitter. Some hashtags get used a lot. Others never really get off the ground.One way to see which hashtags are popular is by using something like…
  • Twubs. Twubs is short for “Twitter Hubs” and provides a one-stop shop for exploring hashtags. The one’s here are #ifihadglass (referring to Google Glass), #Pistorius, and #WalkingDead. If you click on any of these, you’ll be shown a live feed of that hashtag on Twitter. You don’t need a Twitter account to read the feeds, but you do if you want to “join” the conversation through twubs.com.Now, if you don’t know what a hashtag means…
  • You can try tagdef. This is a social site for definitions of hashtags. For example, here’s #ff which is short for Follow Friday. It’s traditional for people to include this hashtag and a list of Twitter accounts on Friday to let other people know “Hey, these sites have been helpful or amusing or interesting to me. I suggest you follow them.”So, if you find an interesting hashtag to follow, go back to the Twitter search or Twubs, see what activity it has, and then follow it if you like.
  • How you can participate in Twitter and create content on their site…and why would you want to?
  • Sometimes the stereotypical reaction to Twitter is “Why would I want to know what people are eating for breakfast?” or some similar trivial facts. While those kinds of tweets exist (and services like Foursquare make it easy for people to say where they are at all times), they can be ignored in favor of more useful information available through Twitter.
  • Here is our Twitter feed from KnowItNow24x7 as it looks at twitter.com/kin24x7.
  • And here’s our Twitter account after logging in on the web interfaceI can tell you some of my reasons I decided to have us participate in Twitter:1) It’s a way to communicate to a broader audience than those who might visit our KnowItNow Provider Site.2) It’s outside our network so when our server happens to go down, we can use our phones to tweet updates on the fix.3) It’s a way to share pertinent information with librarians staffing the service (and anyone else that wants to follow our feed) through retweeting other’s tweets.I’m not a high-frequency Tweeter and we only have around 300 followers, but I’ve been trying to re-tweet more often and respond to I usually tweet from this interface but also use...
  • The app that’s available for the tablet. I like this one because it allows you to easily quote a tweet before re-tweeting it. This can add a nice level of personalization and extra info. One can also…
  • Tweet from your phone. Apps are available for both Android and Apple phones. Phones can be a great tool if you’re live tweeting an event.
  • Some say “I don’t have time for tweeting”. There are ways around this. This site, Twuffer, short for “Twitter buffer”, is a way to schedule tweets to be sent out at specific dates and times. You don’t want to use this for *all* of your tweets, but it can come in very handy if you don’t want to forget to tweet a reminder about that event coming up or other time-sensitive information.
  • It took me quite a while to understand the real power of Twitter in establishing connections with people and replying. I credit Jennifer Hrusch for beginning to open my eyes to its potential.
  • Here are two longer conversations: one with Green County Public Library and the other with Julie Greller, school library media specialist from New Jersey.
  • Twitter isn’t just a text medium anymore. Renovating? Tweet photo updates of the progress. Got in a cool new resource or book? Tweet a photo and a link to a short review? Want to give a short tour of your building? Tweet a video. Want to tweet a list of resources for a specific holiday. Use bitly to create a bundle of links in one short URL.I encourage you to explore each of these and find which one works best for you. Each has its own pros and cons (and some have major cons like Vine), but these can add an interesting dimension to your Twitter activity.I’ve included links to all of these in the Bibliography at the end of the slides.
  • Finally, here are three links to best practices with twitter.I encourage you to explore this service, see what feeds interest you, find out if it can work for you or your library.Which brings us to…
  • Wikifying…
  • Launched in January of 2001 by the Wikimedia Foundation, Wikipedia is today the 6th most visited site on the Internet. There are almost 300 different language versions and over 4 million articles in the English language version alone.Wikipedia’s use as a reference tool, for good or for ill, is well-known. I’d like to quickly list some of the best uses, in my opinion, of the online encyclopedia before turning our attention to participating in the project…
  • Wikipedia’s references, further reading, and external links can be a real time-saver! While we may not share the Wikipedia article itself with a patron, the article can be an extremely useful pre-vetting tool in some cases. This image shows just a small portion of the bottom of the article on maglev (or magnetic levitation) technology. In fact, I’ve used these particular ones for a KnowItNow patron.
  • Wikipedia is *great* for popular culture including movies, music, and books. Here, for example, is the discography for the band “fun” and includes the chart positions for albums and songs in the US and 7 other countries.
  • And this is a good article (see the green circle in the upper right) on AMC’s The Walking Dead tv series. This particular article runs for 19 pages if you wanted to print it out. This article has 76 references to news articles, reviews, and more.
  • The various language version of Wikipedia are great for language study… especially for languages for which a lot of libraries may not have a lot of language learning materials. They can provide extended texts in language for which it might be hard to find those kind of materials.Each language version is a “unique cultural product” written by speakers of that language or in the case of this Old English Wikipedia, those who study the language.This Old English Wikipedia with 2,522 articles.
  • And here’s the Welsh Wikipedia with over 41,000 articles!
  • And here is a the Yiddish Wikipedia with over 10,000 articles.And all versions of a particular article are easily accessible through links in the left-side navigation menu.
  • One can also use Wikipedia to get a local perspective on people, places, and events. For example, here’s the English Wikipedia article for Yuri Shevchuk, a Russian singer/songwriter and political activist. This is the *complete* article in English…
  • Here is only **half** of the article in the Russian Wikipedia with the *entire* English article overlaid! As you can see, there’s no comparison in the amount of information provided in the local language. One could then use Google Translate to translate the Russian page into English and get much more information about Shevchuck on which to search further.So those are just a few of the many legitimate uses one can make of Wikipedia as a reference tool. Now let’s talk about…
  • …how you can participate in the work of the online encyclopedia. Let’s start by asking…
  • How many people here have accounts and have made edits on Wikipedia?I’ve personally made a little over 110 edits on Wikipedia. Some have been minor punctuation edits, others have been adding sources for quotations or links to online resources, and others have been addition of actual content. For example…
  • Here is one of my edits for the article on Sen. Roscoe Conkling. My contribution is the lengthy excerpt from the 1909 NY Times article substantiating Conkling’s role in the divorce of the Spragues. Conkling made life hard for Senator and President James Garfield. I have a soft spot for President Garfield, so I felt bound to add that little tidbit to Conkling’s Wikipedia entry. So, one reason to get involved with editing Wikipedia is simply to have an outlet for your own knowledge and curiosity.
  • Another, directly relevant to libraries, is to take control of your online presence. Many of us have heard that *if* a library has a Facebook page or Twitter account, it has to be maintained and updated regularly. The difference with Wikipedia is that most libraries already *have* a Wikipedia article about them even if they didn’t create it. And it *will* show up in a Google search! At least being aware what others are updating your page with is a good idea!
  • So, how does all this work? Let’s take this article here. The investiture of Pope Francis was a recent event, so this article’s had lots of activity recently. In fact, when the new pope was announced I checked out Wikipedia to see how fast the article would be created or changed. Within minutes of the announcement, the title on the page had changed to Pope Francis I and then back to Pope Francis and back and forth, new information was added. It was amazing to watch and the whole thing was documented on the “View history page” (which we’ll look at in a moment)Let’s dissect this article’s pages…The olive lock in the upper right hand means this article is “Move protected” which means this article cannot be moved to a new title except by an administrator. This no doubt came about because of the controversy over whether it was Pope Francis or Pope Francis I.
  • This article also started out as the Wikipedia entry for Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio and that name redirects to this article now. If we do into “View history” tab we can see *all* previous versions going back to December 30, 2005.
  • Here is what the article looked like just a few days before the Cardinal was elected Pope. However, look at the title. It’s *still* Pope Francis because of that, shall we say, “authority control” imposed by the olive lock.
  • Here is the “Talk” page for that article and the first part of the table of contents of the talk page. *Every* article on Wikipedia has a talk tab which is where Wikipedians can “discuss” the content in an article, what to include, what not to include, whether or not an article needs to be deleted or changed, etc., etc., etc. These are very interesting to read and provide a real behind-the-scenes look at how an article gets to be the way it is.
  • And finally here is the Edit page for the Pope Francis article. If you noticed on the other pages, you could NOT edit this page. You could only view the source code. Once I logged in, I could edit, so that’s one level of “security” Wikipedia has added. Someone cannot anonymously change articles that are protected.The markup language used on Wikipedia is not html, but wikitext. Knowing some html might help, but you’ll have to learn the various formatting conventions. However…
  • Wikipedia makes this as painless as possible with lots of helpful tips and cheat sheets like this…
  • This…
  • And this…
  • There are also a number of training modules available to you.
  • Being a Wikipedian in the library world is not a fringe thing any longer. OCLC has its own “Wikipedian in Residence”…
  • And there is the GLAM Wiki which stands for Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums) and has sub-pages for individual projects like…
  • Edit-a-thons like this one at the British Library in January 2011. The Virtual Reference Services Committee for RUSA is also in the planning stages for an edit-a-thon at ALA Annual in Chicago.
  • We covered a LOT of ground in the past hour! I hope this at least gives you a taste of the possibilities of Google, Twitter, and Wikipedia, and that I’ve given you the urge to go back and explore. I’m a big fan of the idea of cultivating a culture of curiosity, both within individuals as well as within institutions. Feel free to follow @kin24x7 if you’re on Twitter. If you’d like more information on this presentation or any information on KnowItNow24x7 don’t hesitate to contact me at don@cpl.org. As I mentioned at the beginning, you’re welcome to check out the slides to this presentation at my slideshare site (in the interest of not printing out lots of paper for today). So…
  • Thank you very much!
  • Transcript

    • 1. Googling, Tweeting, and Wikifying:Utilizing (And Participating In) The Internets Most Popular SitesGoogle, Twitter, and Wikipedia are consistently in the Top 10most visited sites on the Internet, but each is much morethan a simple destination. All three have great potential forproviding reference assistance to patrons, keeping up-to-date on current events and trends, and sharing yourexpertise with the wider world. This program will shareideas on how to take an active role in each of theseresources and how to get the most out of each one.
    • 2. Googling,Tweeting,and WikifyingUtilizing(and Participating in)the Internet’s MostPopular SitesOhio Library Council Chapter Conferences 2013 #olc_cc13
    • 3. http://www.knowitnow.org Don Boozer KnowItNow24x7 Coordinatorhttp://www.slideshare.net/donboozer
    • 4. Who are wedealing with?
    • 5. 70 offices… 40+ countriesFor-profit companyWho are wedealing with?
    • 6. 3 floors… For-profit70 offices… 40+ countriesFor-profit companyWho are wedealing with?
    • 7. 3 floors… For-profit70 offices… 40+ countriesFor-profit companyWho are wedealing with? 1 floor… Non-profit
    • 8. Operating Revenue$ ALL public libraries in the United States $11 billion
    • 9. “Googling”
    • 10. Utilizing
    • 11. Utilizing #1
    • 12. I’ll just…GOOGLE IT
    • 13. Search BooksScholar Patents GOOGLE ITYouTube Maps Images News Even More…
    • 14. Early 2012
    • 15. Early 2012
    • 16. 2013
    • 17. What elsecan we find outaboutCharles Brushutilizing Google?
    • 18. Report onmanufacturingindustries in theUnited States atthe eleventhcensus: 1890
    • 19. BRUSH FOUNDATION(The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History)“The BRUSH FOUNDATION was established in 1928 inCleveland by CHARLES FRANCIS BRUSH, in memory of hisson, Charles F. Brush, Jr. (d. 1927). The foundationsupported the fledgling Maternal Health Assn. of Cleveland(later PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF GREATER CLEVELAND,PPGC) and played a significant role in the organization andfunding of the Intl. Planned Parenthood Federation (1949).”
    • 20. Afterthat, youneed acookie…
    • 21. www.powersearchingwithgoogle.com
    • 22. Participating In
    • 23. drive.google.com
    • 24. drive.google.com
    • 25. sites.google.com
    • 26. sites.google.com
    • 27. picasa.google.comwww.panoramio.com
    • 28. www.youtube.com
    • 29. blogger.com
    • 30. little-people.blogspot.com
    • 31. developers.google.com
    • 32. “Tweeting”
    • 33. Utilizing #10
    • 34. tweetping.net
    • 35. http://techland.time.com/the-140-best-twitter-feeds-of-2012/
    • 36. search.twitter.com
    • 37. [kim jong un near:seoul]
    • 38. [library near:columbus within:10mi]
    • 39. #hashtag #olc_cc13#ReadAcrossMaryland #ff
    • 40. twubs.com
    • 41. tagdef.com
    • 42. Participating In
    • 43. twitter.com/kin24x7@kin24x7
    • 44. Replies,Retweets (RT),Modified Tweets (MT) and #hashtags
    • 45. Conversations
    • 46. Beyond basic text…
    • 47. Best Practices• dev.twitter.com/media/live-tweeting• dev.twitter.com/media/hashtags• twittertoolsbook.com/how-to-use-twitter-hashtags/
    • 48. “Wikifying”
    • 49. Utilizing #6
    • 50. Referral tool…
    • 51. Popularculture…
    • 52. Popularculture…
    • 53. Language study…
    • 54. Language study…
    • 55. Language study…
    • 56. Local perspective…
    • 57. Local perspective…
    • 58. Participating In
    • 59. Wikipedians• Over 18 million registered users• 270,000 active users monthly• 91% are male• 20% live in United States• 59% are aged 17 – 40
    • 60. Share knowledge and hobbies…
    • 61. Take control of online identity…
    • 62. Promote local resources…
    • 63. March 8, 2013
    • 64. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Cheatsheet
    • 65. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Editing
    • 66. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Wiki_markup
    • 67. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Training
    • 68. Don Boozer don@cpl.orghttp://www.slideshare.net/donboozer
    • 69. Thank you! Don Boozer don@cpl.orghttp://www.slideshare.net/donboozer
    • 70. BIBLIOGRAPHY & SOURCES – Page 1• Rankings from http://www.alexa.com• Public Library operating revenue:https://harvester.census.gov/imls/pubs/Publications/pls2009.pdf• Google revenue: http://investor.google.com/financial/tables.html• Wikimedia Foundation revenue:http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/foundation/4/4f/2012-13_Wikimedia_Foundation_Plan_FINAL_FOR_WEBSITE.pdf• Twitter revenue: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-06-01/twitter-said-to-expect-1-billion-in-sales-in-2014-on-ad-growth.html• Google locations: http://www.google.com/about/company/facts/locations/• Twitter location: http://mashable.com/2012/06/21/twitter-new-san-francisco-headquarters-pics/ http://blog.wikimedia.org/2009/10/27/wikimedia-finds-a-new-home/• Photo: Wikimedia Foundation staff, San Francisco, California. Photographed by LaneHartwell (http://fetching.net/) on behalf of the Wikimedia Foundation.http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wikimedia_Foundation_Staff_05.jpg• Photo for Google Work-in-progress slide: “Portrait of Ernest Edwards, blacksmith ofDrouin, Victoria”http://www.flickr.com/photos/national_library_of_australia_commons/6174068586/(plus addition of Google Logo)
    • 71. BIBLIOGRAPHY & SOURCES – Page 2• Photo for Charles Brush Arc Lamp: http://brentdurken.com/charles-brush-arc-lamp/ Photo of mail room: “U.S. Troops Surrounded by Holiday Mail During WWII”http://www.flickr.com/photos/smithsonian/3112472619• Photo of “John, the Cook, baking slapjacks”http://www.flickr.com/photos/george_eastman_house/4493497975/• Google Graveyard:http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/map_of_the_week/2013/03/google_reader_joins_graveyard_of_dead_google_products.html• Instagram: http://instagram.com/• yfrog: http://yfrog.com/• Vine: https://vine.co/• twitpic: http://twitpic.com/• bitly: http://www.bitly.com

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