Jennie PriceChief ExecutiveSport England
The importance of programmestargeting young women fromdisadvantaged areas• Why this is a priority for Sport England• How t...
Addressing inequalities in participation - genderRegular participation80%70%                      69%60%50%               ...
Addressing inequalities in participation - incomeRegular participation45%40%                                    43%35%30%2...
The numbers are significant                                                                             Adults by social g...
Trend over time       % of women participating in at least one session of 30 minute sport per week at a moderate intensity...
Girls from deprived backgrounds   do less sport than wealthier peers   Participation by 16-25 year old girls by demographi...
Deprived areas Source CLG: 2011 release, 2010 and 2008 data
Deprived areas  • Over 5 million people live in the most deprived areas in    England  • 98% of the most deprived places a...
Sport England strategic objectives• Year on year increase in the number of people in  England playing sport at least once ...
Key components of creating a habit for life• Long term investment in 46 NGBs   – based on clear participation targets   – ...
Where public funds makemost difference• Targeting NGB efforts on  participation• Disability sport• Encouraging a strategic...
Sport England programmes focussed onlower socio-economic groups• Door step clubs• Get on Track• Active Women
Active Women programme• £7.5m revenue funding awarded to 20 projects• 3 national, 17 local to deliver for up to three year...
Headline findings from year 1 MonitoringRecruitment is going well:• Overall projects achieved 99% of their total year 1 pa...
Headline findings from year 1ImpactWomen reported very positive impacts:• 61% said they had done more sport in the previou...
Lessons from year 1Attracting women to take partWhat makes a difference:• Face to face recruitment               Incentive...
Lessons from year 1Retaining women in activityThis requires:• Convenient session times• Accessible venue locations• Childc...
Lessons from year 1Retaining women in activityAnd:• Frequent contact from project staff• Social dynamic of sessions• Soft ...
Next steps• Active Women -  continued delivery,  more evaluation• Place based pilot:   – Creating the best possible     en...
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The importance of programmes targeting young women from disadvantaged areas | Us Girls 'Get in the Know' 2013

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  • Street Games has requested this information which we will send to them on Friday 4th JanuaryDarcy has provided an update on the evaluation work that we are doing on Street Games work.Sport England has commissioned IFF to carry out some evaluation of the StreetGames Active Women project (Us Girls) and of the Doorstep Clubs pilot phase. The Active Women evaluation involves carrying out depth interviews with 20 Us Girls project leads (including a couple of projects that dropped out of the consortium). The Doorstep Clubs evaluation involves carrying out 8 project lead interviews and observing 8 sessions of activity. The purpose of the work is to understand the efficacy of the StreetGames delivery model. StreetGamesis aware of both these pieces of work, which have been designed to complement their own monitoring and evaluation activities, and have been cooperating by sharing project information and contact details etc. IFF will be sharing the results of both pieces of work with us in one report at the end of January 2013.
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  • Street Games has requested this information which we will send to them on Friday 4th JanuaryDarcy has provided an update on the evaluation work that we are doing on Street Games work.Sport England has commissioned IFF to carry out some evaluation of the StreetGames Active Women project (Us Girls) and of the Doorstep Clubs pilot phase. The Active Women evaluation involves carrying out depth interviews with 20 Us Girls project leads (including a couple of projects that dropped out of the consortium). The Doorstep Clubs evaluation involves carrying out 8 project lead interviews and observing 8 sessions of activity. The purpose of the work is to understand the efficacy of the StreetGames delivery model. StreetGames is aware of both these pieces of work, which have been designed to complement their own monitoring and evaluation activities, and have been cooperating by sharing project information and contact details etc. IFF will be sharing the results of both pieces of work with us in one report at the end of January 2013.
  • Projects struggling to meet their throughput targets is something we have seen with other programmes too (eg Active Universities), it is not unique to Active Women. Projects generally seem to be able to estimate their participant numbers quite accurately but are over-optimistic about throughput (ie they attract the number of people that they expect but these people don’t take part as many times as anticipated).
  • Evidence of longer term impact (sustainability of behaviour change) will come from the second and third years of the evaluation.
  • How participants found out about the project:40% of women heard about the project from a friend or family (15% from a leaflet, 15% from meeting the coach at a launch event, 11% from a poster, 9% online)Women aged 16-24 were most likely to have found out about the project from a family memberWomen from deprived areas were less likely than other women to have heard about the project onlineFace to faceeg at public launch events where women can meet coaches as well as participants, and see example activity sessions. One project found the creation of ‘local champions’ (participants went out into the community and spoke to other women e.g. in cafes and primary schools) was more effective at generating new recruits than a simultaneous marketing ‘push’ with posters, flyers and social networking.Personal follow up contact eg from a coach following a public event, which can help answer questions and diffuse concernsBring a friend – 84% recommended the activity to someone they knew and 57% had taken a friend to a sessionWide promotion – need to promote in areas women from the target group are likely to be (not just leisure centres) using a variety of media (in person, posters, leaflets, online etc)Linking with partner organisations – community orgs can help engage with women from a wide range of backgroundsAddressing women’s concerns eg that they ‘won’t be good enough’ at sport, about their appearance, about going in to an unfamiliar environment etc
  • Convenient session times – it’s important to monitor and adjust session times to meet women’s needs. The most common reason given for dropping out of activity (35%) was that the session times were not convenientAccessible venues – choosing venues that are within walking distance or easily reachable by bus (to reduce the cost and time of travelling)Childcare facilities – not many projects succeeded by offering childcare directly (as it was expensive and take-up was often poor) but others did succeed by working in partnership with local organisations (linking to existing childcare provision which was sometimes felt to be of a higher quality than childcare provided directly by the project)Drop-in sessions – popular because of the flexibility - women did not want to have to commit to (and pay in advance for) a whole course of activityCost – needs to be affordable – women from deprived areas with child caring responsibilities were most likely to mention the low cost of sessions as a reason for attending AW sessions
  • Frequent contact – This helped to encourage and motivate participants (esp those who had missed some sessions)Sessions designed to foster a sociable atmosphere – emphasis on socialising and fun rather than just getting fit or competing.Coaches – ‘soft’ skills and personality is essential so that women are relaxed and enjoy themselves egby adopting a light touch approach offering subtle hints and tips, as opposed to heavy handed advice or training. Incentives – can be an effective tool for retaining women eg loyalty schemes etc
  • The importance of programmes targeting young women from disadvantaged areas | Us Girls 'Get in the Know' 2013

    1. 1. Jennie PriceChief ExecutiveSport England
    2. 2. The importance of programmestargeting young women fromdisadvantaged areas• Why this is a priority for Sport England• How this fits into our wider work• What we’ve learnt• What next
    3. 3. Addressing inequalities in participation - genderRegular participation80%70% 69%60%50% 47%40% 41%30% 31%20%10% 0% Boys (16) Girls (16) Men Women Source: Active People Survey, results for 12 months to October 2012. 1 x 30 refers to at least one 30 minutes session of sport per week
    4. 4. Addressing inequalities in participation - incomeRegular participation45%40% 43%35%30%25% 27%20%15%10% 5% 0% Wealthiest Disadvantaged Source: Active People Survey, results for 12 months to October 2012. 1 x 30 refers to at least one 30 minutes session of sport per week Wealthy refers to NS-SEC 1-2, Disadvantaged refers to NS-SEC 5-8
    5. 5. The numbers are significant Adults by social grade• Over 7 million women in (millions) 25 the lower social grades: – 37% of adult women 20 – 19% of all adults 15 11.99 12.87 NS SEC 1-4 10 NS SEC 5-8 5 7.26 7.31 - Women MenSource: ONS, data for adults (16-74). Chart does not include NS SEC 9 (not classified). NS SEC 5-8 is lower supervisory andtechnical, semi-routine and routine occupations, never worked and long term unemployed
    6. 6. Trend over time % of women participating in at least one session of 30 minute sport per week at a moderate intensity40% NS SEC 1-4 NS SEC 5-835% 34.0% 34.8% 33.6% 33.6% 33.3% 33.4%30%25% 23.0% 23.6% 23.0% 22.7% 22.1% 20.9%20%15%10%5%0% APS1 2006-07 APS2 APS3 APS4 APS5 APS6 (Oct 2005- (Oct 2007- (Oct 2008-09) (Oct 2009-10) (Oct 2010- (Oct 2011- 06) 08) 11) 12)Base: All womenSource: Sport England Active People Survey
    7. 7. Girls from deprived backgrounds do less sport than wealthier peers Participation by 16-25 year old girls by demographic group 50.00% NS SEC 1-4 45.00% NS SEC 5-8 40.00% 35.00% 30.00% 25.00% 20.00% 15.00% 10.00% 5.00% 0.00% 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12Source: Chart: Active People Survey, results for 12 months to October for years shown (based on 1 x 30 participation)NSSEC NS SEC1,1.1,1.2,2 Managerial and professional, NS SEC3 Intermediate, NS SEC4 Small employers / own account workersNS SEC5,6,7,8 Lower supervisory/technical/ routine /semi-routine/never worked /long term unemployed
    8. 8. Deprived areas Source CLG: 2011 release, 2010 and 2008 data
    9. 9. Deprived areas • Over 5 million people live in the most deprived areas in England • 98% of the most deprived places are in urban areas with pockets of deprivation in rural areas • The situation is relatively static: 88 per cent of the areas that are the most deprived in 2010 were also amongst the most deprived in 2007Source CLG: 2011 release, 2010 and 2008 data
    10. 10. Sport England strategic objectives• Year on year increase in the number of people in England playing sport at least once a week• A particular emphasis on 14-25 year olds, to create a sporting habit for life• A significant increase in the number of people with a disability playing sport regularly
    11. 11. Key components of creating a habit for life• Long term investment in 46 NGBs – based on clear participation targets – payment for results• Specific programmes aimed at transition points – Satellite clubs – HE and FE• Targeted local investment• Extra effort on disability sport
    12. 12. Where public funds makemost difference• Targeting NGB efforts on participation• Disability sport• Encouraging a strategic approach to local authority investment in sport• Leveraging other investment• Lower socio-economic groups
    13. 13. Sport England programmes focussed onlower socio-economic groups• Door step clubs• Get on Track• Active Women
    14. 14. Active Women programme• £7.5m revenue funding awarded to 20 projects• 3 national, 17 local to deliver for up to three years from January 2011• all projects are targeting women in disadvantaged communities and/or women caring for children• StreetGames received the largest single award (consortium of 45 projects)
    15. 15. Headline findings from year 1 MonitoringRecruitment is going well:• Overall projects achieved 99% of their total year 1 participants targetReaching women from the target groups is not straightforward:• Projects on women from deprived areas attracted 57% of their target• Projects on women caring for children attracted 65% of their targetRetention is also proving challenging:• Overall projects reporting throughput achieved 42% of their year 1 target
    16. 16. Headline findings from year 1ImpactWomen reported very positive impacts:• 61% said they had done more sport in the previous month than in the month before their involvement with the AW project (17% did the same and 21% did less)• 28% said they would have done no sport without the AW project (48% would have done less while 22% would have done at least as much)• 99% had fun, 89% felt fitter, and 88% felt better about themselves
    17. 17. Lessons from year 1Attracting women to take partWhat makes a difference:• Face to face recruitment Incentives• Personal follow up contact Project coaches• Overtly encouraging existing Contact from project staffto ‘bring participants a friend’• Wide promotion Social dynamic of sessions• Linking with partner organisations / tone of sessions Atmosphere• Providing easy access to practical information Cost about what the sessionsSession times will entail Venue location• Providing reassurance to address women’s concerns about attending facilities Drop in sessions Childcare
    18. 18. Lessons from year 1Retaining women in activityThis requires:• Convenient session times• Accessible venue locations• Childcare facilities• Drop-in sessions• Affordable prices
    19. 19. Lessons from year 1Retaining women in activityAnd:• Frequent contact from project staff• Social dynamic of sessions• Soft skills of project coaches• Incentives
    20. 20. Next steps• Active Women - continued delivery, more evaluation• Place based pilot: – Creating the best possible environment for women to choose sport – Working with a range of providers and influencers – Creating social groups where playing sport is the norm

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