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Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction
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Agent based modeling & roman resource extraction

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  • http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/innis-mcluhan/index-e.html Harold Innis, 1920s, photograph by H. James
  • Prince of Wales (later Edward VII), Sept 1901http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=printpage%3Btopic=18781.0%3Bimageshttp://www.theprovince.com/Vancouver+1880s/4563695/story.htmlhttp://www.unbf.ca/forestry/centers/cwru/soe/timeline.htmhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timber_slide
  • . create a world with a resource.2. allow agents to harvest that resource (they can see a certain distance within the world).3. movement in the world consumes the resource (they all have differing metabolisms).4. if agents consume more resource than they have on hand, they die.
  • . agents could ask for help from those in their local neighborhood (thus becoming clients).6. helping other agents (ie, being a patron) increases prestige, which translates back into an enhanced ability to extract resources (a routine for euergetism).7. agents with high prestige compete against each other for even more prestige, drawing on the resources of those who owe them for their earlier help.http://www.history.com/photos/chester-a-arthur/photo4
  • If we can encode our beliefs about the past, we can explore the unintended & emergent outcomes of those beliefs via modelling.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Agent Based Modeling & Roman Resource Extraction<br />An exploratory lab<br />Shawn Graham, Carleton University<br />shawn_graham@carleton.ca<br />@electricarchaeo<br />
    • 2. The problem with Roman resources<br />Evidence<br />Growth and the extractive economy?<br />
    • 3. Harold Innis & the intellectual foundations for growth<br />
    • 4.
    • 5. Agent modeling<br />Necessary simplifications<br />Simulation: not of the past, but of our thinking about the past<br />Bill Murray & <br />Groundhog Day<br />
    • 6. The model<br />Economy<br />Environment<br />Patronage<br />....in a resource economy, patronage enables effective exploitation...<br />
    • 7. An Example of Model Code<br />
    • 8. Set up the basics:<br />1. create a world with a resource.<br />2. harvest<br />3. movement = consumes resource.<br />4. consumption > resource = death.<br />
    • 9. Add patronage:<br />5. can ask for help (become a client)<br />6. can help others; can improve the world<br />7. compete & support<br />
    • 10. In practice, one cycle looks like this:<br />
    • 11. Model Results<br />Four different resource settings<br />Model stops at 50 generations<br /># of cycles it takes to reach that end point: stability, instability<br />Generated social networks: <br />Network growth<br />Network reach (participation rate)<br />Embeddedness<br />Compare with real-world social networks<br />
    • 12. Correspondence with observed brick networks in first & second centuries<br />Other patterns<br />‘strong’ network growth implications <br />Occurs for particular settings for forest, mineral, and clay<br />embeddedness<br />
    • 13. Lab conclusions<br />Patterns of inequality<br />What kind of growth?<br />
    • 14. From the lab to the real world: an agenda<br />A framework for understanding... BUT<br />Need more & better network data from antiquity<br />Epigraphy, prosopography, archaeometry, regional distribution studies, etc can provide this<br />A model is just a tool for sharpening thoughts. <br />Model shortcomings & desiderata<br />

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