FLYINGSAUCERREVIEN           Volume 32, No. 5, 1987Forty Years On: Kenneth Arnold                  and the F.B.I.         ...
The book that settles all                  The two books that have changed  argument about the matter                     ...
EditorGORDON CREIGHTON,      MA. FAGs. FAAs   (UK)                                                      Consultants and Co...
KENNETH ARNOLD AND THE F.B.I.(From documents obtained by Peter Gersten and CAUS}With Comments by John A. Keel, FSR Consult...
caused the flash. All this went through my mind in             what he thought he saw. less than a tenth of a second as I ...
be about one thousand feet from where he was stand­              had seen the aforementioned flying disks. xxxxxxxxx­ing. ...
xxxxxxxx has recently purchased a xxxxxxxxxxxxxx­                  age and achieved the rank of Eagle scout before I wasxx...
On June 2 4th, Tuesday, 1 94 7, I had finished my      so clear that it was very easy to see obj ects and deter­ work for ...
-           <:(           w                                                                                C A r� I ll !I ...
some type of airplane, even though they didnt con­              obj ects of similar shape and design as I described and fo...
·     ·_:Office                                         Memorandum                                           •   UNITED ST...
I r < (_j e n t                                                                                                           ...
.   .                                                                -../                                                 ...
-                                                                              .                           /1 . f         ...
Then finally, the UFO made a sweep, passing very                                                               near to J.M...
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987
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Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987

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FLYING SAUCER REVIEW, the international journal established in 1955, is a quarterly magazine printed by quality litho on fine art paper, and with overseas governments and air force libraries as long-term subscribers and read by Prince Philip since the 1950s, FSR is recognized as the leading international organ in the world on the subject.

It is produced in England with the collaboration of a team of more than seventy experts and specialists from Britain and twenty other countries, including Western Europe, and the USA, Canada, Latin America, Russia, Ukraine, Slovenia,China, Japan and the Middle East. They include numerous PhDs, doctors of medicine, astronomers, physicists and other scientific experts.

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Flying Saucer Review - Volume 32, No. 5 1987

  1. 1. FLYINGSAUCERREVIEN Volume 32, No. 5, 1987Forty Years On: Kenneth Arnold and the F.B.I. See page 2
  2. 2. The book that settles all The two books that have changed argument about the matter everything ... ABOVE TOP SECRET: THE WORLD-WIDE INTRUDERS by Budd Hopkins UFO COVER-UP publ. by Random House, by New York. TIMOTHY GOOD 1987. Price: $17.95 Foreword by LORD HILL-NORTON, GCB., Chief of Defence Staff 1971-73. COMMUNION by Whitley Strieber Published July 1987 British edition by Price £14.95 Century Hutchinson, Ltd. SIDGWICK & JACKSON, LONDON 1987. Price: £10.95FLYING SAUCER REVIEWANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION (Six issues) UK and EEC (Common Market) Countries: £12.00 (Single copies: £2.50) Western Hemisphere: $US25.00 (Single copies: $US5.00) All other countries: £15 (Single copies: £3.00) All prices include postage by surface mail.Air Mail extra: for Western Hemisphere: $US10.00 All other countries: £6.00.Overseas subscribers should remit by cheque drawn in Sterling on a bank in theUnited Kingdom, or by cheque in US dollars drawn in the USA only, or byInternational Money Order in Sterling. If remitting by Giro then FSRs accountnumber is 356 3251.All mail, editorial matter and subscriptions should be addressed to:The Editor, FSR Publications Ltd., Snodland, Kent ME6 5HJ, England.Remittances should be made payable to "FSR Publications Ltd. " Artwork: Eve and Contributors ii
  3. 3. EditorGORDON CREIGHTON, MA. FAGs. FAAs (UK) Consultants and Correspondents CHARLES BOWEN, (UK) Former Editor (1964-1982) THE REVEREND CHARLES HARRINGTON (UK) V.J. BALLESTER-OLMOS (GEl- SPAIN) LEIF HAVIK (UFO NORGE- NORWAY) DR WALTER K. BUHLER, MD (SBEDV- BRAZIL) RICHARD HEIDEN (USA) AHMAD JAMALUDIN (MALAYSIA & SE ASIA) JONATHAN CAPLAN, MA {UK) JOHN A. KEEL (USA) BILL CHALKER, ssc.Hons (AU$TRALIA) MILOS KRMELJ {YUGOSLAVIA) ANTONIO CHIUMIENTO {CISU- /TALY) ANDERS LILJEGREN (ARCHIVES FOR UFO GRAHAM CONWAY (CANADA- BRITISH RESEARCH, SWEDEN) COLUMBIA) JUDY MAGEE {AUSTRALIA- VUFORS) DR ROBERT F. CREEGAN, MA. PhD (USA) HANS HERMANN MARKERT (WEST GERMANY)ESTABLISHED SPRING 1955 JOAN PLANA CRIVILLEN {GEl- SPAIN) YUSUKE J. MATSUMURA {CBA INTERNATIONAL, IGNACIO DARNAUDE ROJAS-MARCOS (SPAIN) JAPAN) PAT DELGADO (UK) AIME MICHEL (FRANCE) TIM DINSDALE, FAGS (UK) WILLIAM L. MOORE (FOCUS NEWSLETTER, USA) PAUL DONG (CHINA) DR RICHARD C. NIEMTZOW, MD. PhD (USA) ANN DRUFFEL, BA (USA) PAUL B. NORMAN (AUSTRALIA- VUFORS) DR P. M. H. EDWARDS, PhD, MA, FTCL, LAAM, AACM DR JEAN-PIERRE PETIT (FRANCE) (CANADA- VANCOUVER ISLAND & DR ROBERTO PINOTTI (GUN-/TALY) BRITISH COLUMBIA) DAVID POWELL (SOUTH AFRICA) LAWRENCE FENWICK (CUFORN- CENTRAL ANTONIO RIBERA (SPAIN) CANADA) DR VLADIMIR V. RUBTSOV (USSR)Volume 32, No. 5 JOAQUIM FERNANDES (CNIFO - PORTUGAL) LUIS SCHONHERR (AUSTRIA) DR BERNARD E. FINCH, MAGS, LACP. DCh, FBIS (UK) DR BERTHOLD SCHWARZ, MD (USA)(published August 1987) OMAR FOWLER (SIGAP- UK) JEAN SIDER (FRANCE- LDLN) DR JOHN F. GILLE, PhD (FRANCE) G. E. SKOV (/GAP, DENMARK) TIMOTHY GOOD (UK) DR WILLY SMITH, PhD (UN/CAT PROJECT, USA) IRENE GRANCHI (CISNE- BRAZIL) DR R. LEO SPRINKLE, PhD (USA) DR I. GRATTAN-GUINNESS, MA. MSc. PhD. DSc (UK) THE REVEREND DONALD THOMAS (UK) CONTENTS MARiA-ANGELA THOMAS GUMA (Jane Thomas) (SPANISH AMERICA) DR JACQUES VALLEE, PhD (USA) GENEVIEVE VANQUELEF (FRANCE- LDLN) Forty Years On: Kenneth Arnold DR RICHARD F. HAINES, PhD (USA) PAUL WHITEHEAD (UK) and the F.B.I. KHALED HAMSHO {SYRIA & MIDDLE EAST) DR LEONARD M. WILDER, BDS ILonctl {UK) John Keel ................................ 2 DR JAMES A. HARDER, PhD {USA) PROF. R. H. B. WINDER, BSc. CEng FIMechE {UK) Close Sightings by Portuguese The international journal on cosmology and eschatology, and for the discussion of A.F. Pilots (November 1982) reports of unidentified flying objects and their alien occupants. Jose Sottomayor and Antonio Rodrigues . ....... 12 An Abduction in Sweden? Hakan Blomqvist ... .... 14 The "Steel Airship" at Bois-de-Champ (April 1954) Joel Mesnard .... ............. 16 UFOs And The Limits to Scientific A SERIOUS QUESTION sR has now been in existence for thirty-two years. During the first half Knowledge Muslim Siregar .............. ....... 19 "Parallel Worlds": Recent Comment From An Eminent Fof this period, a number of remarkable claims were made - and not Oxford Physicist only by George Adamski but also by a number of other people in various The Rev. Donald Thomas ..... 23 parts of the world - who said that they had encountered, and sometimes Sects and UFOs in the Andes .. 24 talked with, beings who were "alien", and certainly not from here, but who More Poltergeistery in Brazil ... 25 appeared in all respects to be entirely human, and to be well disposed towards Weird Faculties ................ ........ 26 "Through The Looking Glass" 28 us. Meteor Cooks A Goose . ............ iii It is of crucial importance for mankind to make every effort to establish, Mail Bag ... ..... iii beyond any peradventure, whether those claims were true. Because most of the reports that have come to us for the last decade and more tell a mighty © Flying Saucer Review different story indeed. Strange things are happening in our world. And Library of Congress much is coming to light now that it would probably never be wise to prop­ copyright FSR Publications agate among the general public, since knowledge of it could not conceiv­ Limited 1981 ably benefit them in any fashion whatsoever. Contributions We have of course our own theories as to what may be occurring. And appearing in this magazine do not on several occasions in recent years we have referred to this aspect of the necessarily reflect its puzzle, and have asked readers to see whether they cannot find any more policy and are close encounter cases "of the nice early kind". So far we have drawn a total published without prejudice blank. Nothing "nice" seems to be making its appearance. We therefore re­ For subscription peat our appeal: please let us have full details of all those wonderful details and address encounters with the "Goodies". Because, by Heavens, it looks as though please see foot of mankind is going to be in desperate need of solid proof that such gentry page ii of cover exist somewhere - anywhere - in the Universe. Even if certain "ob­ stacles" are holding up their operations here very badly at present !
  4. 4. KENNETH ARNOLD AND THE F.B.I.(From documents obtained by Peter Gersten and CAUS}With Comments by John A. Keel, FSR Consultant URING the 1 960s, I approached the Federal Bureau ter sent to the Army at an earlier date. Like so manyDof Investigation (F.B.I.) in Washington, D .C., ask­ of the F.B.I. papers from the J. Edgar Hoover era, thising to see their UFO-related files. Each time they as­ item would not stand up in a court of law. But it issured me that the F.B.I. had absolutely no interest in very interesting, nonetheless.UFOs and therefore no such files existed. But in the The second document describes a phone call madelate 1 9 7 0s, the New York lawyer Peter Gersten ap­ to David Johnson, aviation editor of the Idaho Dailyplied the new Freedom of Information Act and forced Statesman, although his name has of course been de­the F.B.I. to produce hundreds of documents. Among leted. (Most of the other deletions in this documentthese were the original reports on Kenneth Arnold. As are Kenneth Arnolds name.) Lieutenant Frankis their practice, the F.B.I. carefully deleted the names Brown wrote this for the Army Air Force investigatingof the individuals mentioned in the reports, but it was group. The third document is also by Brown, and iseasy to restore most of the missing information, using basically an endorsement of Arnold as a reliable wit­Arnolds public statements and later interviews. ness. These two documents by Brown were both writ­ Although there was a massive "ghost rocket" wave ten for the Air Forces Confidential file, and both werein Europe in 1 945-46, most UFO historians regard later found in the F.B.I.s UFO file even though theArnolds sighting on June 24, 1 94 7, as the real begin­ F.B.I. professed to have no interest in UFO matters.ning of the "Flying Saucer". He was an exceptionally Two weeks later, Lt. Frank M. Brown and Captaincredible witness, as the interviewers note in these William Davidson would die in a plane crash shortlydocuments, and his later involvement in the Maury after taking off from McChord Field in Tacoma. TheyIsland "hoax" proved him to be an exceptional inves­ had been visiting Arnold who was investigating thetigator as well. But in the years following the events of notorious "Maury Island" affair. At that point in time, 1 94 7, he and his family were hounded by eager UFO Brown and Davidson were the only Air Force officersbuffs and bewildered witnesses. Finally, he delib­ involved in UFO investigations. Two weeks after theerately spread the rumour that he had moved to Aus­ plane crash, Paul Lance, a newspaper reporter in­tralia. He made very few public appearances and pur­ volved in the Maury Island mystery, died very sud­posefully demanded an exorbitant lecture fee. But he denly. Harold Dahls 1 2-year-old son vanished sud­did speak in Chicago, Ill. in June 1 9 7 7, before a UFO denly at the same time. Dahl and his son had beenconvention organized by Jerome Clark and FATE aboard a boat in Tacoma harbour when they sightedmagazine. some "flying doughnuts" near Maury Island. Weeks Kenneth Arnold passed away in January, 1 985, in later, Dahls son was found in the tiny village of Lusk,Bellevue, Washington, only a few miles from the site Wyoming, many hundreds of miles from Tacoma. Heof his 1 94 7 sighting. was suffering from total amnesia! The big surprise in the F.B.I. documents was a re­ A rigorous campaign was also waged by someone toport by a prospector who had been working the Cas­ ridicule and discredit Ray Palmer, the Chicago editorcade Mountains on that same afternoon of June 24, who sent Kenneth Arnold $200 for expenses to inves­1 94 7, when he saw "five or six" disc-shaped objects tigate the Maury Island case.weaving through the mountains ! Apparently this man The last of the documents was written by Arnold(his name was deleted from the report by the F.B.I.) himself and submitted to the F.B.I. It proves him to bewas a corroborative witness to Arnolds sighting, and a very careful observer and is filled with significantwas viewing the objects from the ground while Arnold detail. It also raises some rather astonishing questions.was watching them from the air ! Note that the docu­ These questions haunted Arnold privately.ment bears the notation "REPORTS OF FLYING His attention was drawn to the objects by a brightD ISCS . . . SECURITY MATTER -X". flash of light. Twenty years later, at his speech in Chi­ cago, he provided more details. "As I was making this I should mention that in handling stacks of these 1 80 ° turn," he said, "and flying directly towardliberated Government documents, I have found that Mount Rainier at about 9200 feet elevation, a tremen­the F.B.I. reports in particular were very badly writ� dous flash appeared in the sky. It lit up my wholeten, lacking in significant detail and often filled with aircraft even the cockpit, and I was startled. I thoughtidiotic speculation and innuendo. The prospectors re­ I was very close to collision with some aircraft I hadntport is completely lacking in background detail. We seen. Or, I thought, possibly a military plane haddont even know if the prospector spoke to an F.B.I. dived over the nose of my airplane and the reflectionagent directly or if this report was derived from a let- of the afternoon sun against his wing surfaces had 2
  5. 5. caused the flash. All this went through my mind in what he thought he saw. less than a tenth of a second as I began to look around The most amazing thing of all is that, although his below me and ahead of me. And then the flash came story has been told over and over again in countless again. This very bright flash, almost like an arc light, books and articles, no-one has ever raised these was coming from a group of obj ects far up to the simple questions before. north of Mount Rainier in the area of Mount Baker, The objects passed over a measurable course fifty which is almost in a line with Mount Rainier and miles in length in 1 0 2 seconds. "I had worked out Mount Adams. I saw a chain of very peculiar aircraft mathematically how fast the strange craft were going," approaching Mount Rainier very rapidly - I think I Arnold said in 1 9 7 7, "and every time I reworked it, it described their formation at the time as looking like a came out that they were going over 1 7 00 miles an +ail of a Chinese kite." hour. It was mind-boggling! I even measured the base Read his report carefully, and the report of the of the mountains - both Mount Rainier and Mountprospector, and you will see that the objects were ap­ Adams - on my aeronautical charts, and took theproximately 30 feet in diameter. They were weaving minimum reading of twenty-nine miles and refigured among the mountains at a speed in excess of 1 ,200 it; they still clocked out at over 1 300 miles an hour."miles per hour! And they were twenty miles from Ar­ There was only one man-made supersonic plane innolds position. So Arnold was observing small (30 existence in 1 94 7 , and it could not attain 1 7 00 mph.feet) objects travelling at supersonic speed twenty If Arnold could not have seen obj ects moving thatmiles in front of him ! Something is wrong here. I all fast, what did he actually see? After the first flash of fhis calculations were correct he would not be able to see light he may have watched part of something . . . some­ those things at all. They were too small . . . they were too thing much larger and much different from what hefar away . . . and they were moving too fast to be visible thought he was seeing. The strobe-like movement of to the naked eye! the objects even suggests that either they - or Ar­ About the flashes. As I have pointed out in my nold - were in a different time-frame . . . a phenom­books and numerous articles, a brilliant flash of light enon well-known to Forteans. Arnolds navigationaloften occurs before the appearance of UFOs, angels, clock could have been malfunctioning temporarily.demons and chimeras. And in hundreds of cases, such Whatever happened on that sunny June 24th in 194 7,as the famous Ohio helicopter incident in 1 9 7 3 , a Kenneth Arnold opened a magical door for all of us thatflash phenomenon takes place j ust prior to distortions afternoon, and all manner of weird entities and objectsof time and space. In the Ohio incident the helicopter have been pouring through it ever since. - J.A.K.was suddenly transposed 3,000 feet with no action onthe part of the pilot. It was around 2 p.m. when Arnold saw the flash. A DOCUMENT NO. 1beautiful, cloudless day. He was travelling NE and thesun was above and slightly behind him. The obj ects OFFICE MEMORAND UM. UNITED STATESwere going SE. It is remotely possible that the sun GOVERNMENTcould have reflected from the objects but remember TO : Director, FBI Date : 9- 1 7 - 4 7that Arnold was almost level with them and they were FROM : SAC, Portlandtwenty miles away. So it is highly unlikely that the SUBJECT : REPORTS OF FLYING D ISCSflashes were reflections of the sun It seems more probable SECURITY MAITER-X that they were aimed directly at A rnold, a tiny speck in the sky twenty miles distant. KENNETH ARNOLD WAS SOMEHO W MEANT TO SEE THESE THINGS. Refer San Francisco letter dated September 4, 1 94 7. Clocks and stopwatches are very important in aerial xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, Port­navigation and, like all pilots, Arnold was accustomed land, reported without consulting any records that onto their use. His estimates of the speed of the UFOs June 24, 1 94 7 , while prospecting at a point in the Cas­are probably accurate, ± 200 miles. But can anyone cade Mountains approximately five thousand feetsee a 30-ft. object travelling at 1 ,200 miles an hour at from sea level, during the afternoon he noticed a re­a distance of 20 miles? flection, looked up, and saw a disc proceeding in a The answer is: no. south-easterly direction. Immediately upon sighting The general rule is that anything going faster than this object he placed his telescope to his eye and ob­7 00 mph is invisible to the naked eye. A bullet, for served the disc for approximately forty-five to sixtyexample. However, experienced soldiers can not only seconds. He remarked that it is possible for him tosee artillery shells and mortar rounds in the air, they pick up an object at a distance of ten miles with hiscan even tell where they are going to land. But they telescope. At the time the disc was sighted by Mr. xxx­travel at speeds between 400- 700 mph. xxxxxxxxx it was banking in the sun, and he observed Kenneth Arnold led an exemplary life. He was a five or six similar obj ects but only concentrated ondecent, honest man. There is no reason to think that one. H e related that they did not fly in any particularhe lied about his sighting. Yet he could not haue seen formation and that he would estimate their height to 3
  6. 6. be about one thousand feet from where he was stand­ had seen the aforementioned flying disks. xxxxxxxxx­ing. He said the obj ect was about thirty feet in diam­ xxx stated that after xxxxxxxxxxxx reported havingeter, and appeared to have a tail. It made no noise. seen the flying disks, that the editor of the paper had According to xxxxxxxxxxxx he remained in the assigned him, xxxxxxxxxxxx the assignment of takingvicinity of the Cascades for several days and then re­ the airplane belonging to the newspaper and exhaust­turned to Portland and noted an article in the local ing all efforts to prove or disprove the probability ofpaper which stated in effect that a man in Boise, Id­ flying disks having been seen in the north-west area.aho, had sighted a similar obj ect but that authorities The results of this assignment to xxxxxxxxxxxx andhad disclaimed any knowledge of such an obj ect. He what he subsequently saw is put forth in a swornsaid he communicated with the Army for the sole pur­ statement signed by xxxxxxxxxxxx attached to thispose of attempting to add credence to the story fur­ report as Exhibit B.nished by the man in Boise. xxxxxxxxxxxx also related that on the occasion ofhis sighting the objects on June 24, 1 94 7 he had in his AGENTS NOTES ; xxxxxxxxxxxx is a man of ap­possession a combination compass and watch. He proximately 3 3 to 35 years of age. From all appear­noted particularly that immediately before he sighted ances he is a very reserved type of person. xxxxxxxxx­the disc the compass acted very peculiar, the hand xxx has logged 2900 hours of flying time in variouswaving from one side to the other, but that this con­ types of airplanes up to and including multi-enginedition corrected itself immediately after the discs had aircraft. D uring part of the war years, xxxxxxxxxxxxpassed out of sight. as the xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Informant appeared to be a very reliable individual being assigned to the Twentieth USAAF andwho advised that he had been a prospector in the stationed on Tinian Island, in the Pacific. It is the per­states of Montana, Washington, and Oregon for the sonal opinion of the interviewer that xxxxxxxxxxxxpast forty years. actually saw what he states that he saw in the attachedFJS :KAM report. It is also the opinion of the interviewer that x­62 - 1 53 1 xxxxxxxxxxx would have much more to lose than2 cc: San Francisco (62-2938) gain and would have to be very strongly convinced that he actually saw something before he would reportDOCUMENT NO. 2 such an incident and open himself for the ridicule that would accompany such a report. Incident 1 I ncl : Exhibit "B" 4AF 1 208 I FRANK M. BROWN, S/A, CIC 4th AF 1 6 July 1 94 7 DOCUMENT NO. 3MEMORANDUM FOR THE OFFICER INCHARGE I ncident 4AF 1 208 I 1 . On 1 2 July 1 94 7, a call was made at the news­ 1 6 July 1 94 7 paper office of the "Idaho Daily Statesman", Boise, Idaho. The xxxxxxxxxxxx of the paper, xxxxxxxxxxx­ MEMORAN D UM FOR THE OFFICER INx, was interviewed in regard to how well he knewxxxxxxxxxxxx of Boise, Idaho, and as to the credi­ CHARGEbility of any statement made by xxxxxxxxxxxx. Thepurpose of this interview was an attempt to verify 1 . On 1 2 July 1 94 7, xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx­statements made by xxxxxxxxxxxx on 26 June, 1 94 7 , x, Boise, Idaho, was interviewed in regard to the re­t o various national news services t o the effect that he, port by xxxxxxxxxxxx that he saw 9 strange objectsxxxxxxxxxxxx had seen 9 obj ects flying in the air flying over the Cascade Mountain Range of Washing­above the Cascade Mountain Range of Washington. ton State on July 25th. xxxxxxxxxxxx voluntarilyThese obj ects were subsequently referred to as flying agreed to give the interviewer a written report ofsaucers or flying disks and will here-in-after be re­ exactly what he had seen on the above mentionedferred to as such in this report. xxxxxxxxxxxx stated date. The written report of xxxxxxxxxxxx is attachedthat he had known xxxxxxxxxxxx for quite a period to this report as Exhibit A.of time, having had relations with xxxxxxxxxxxx onvarious occasions, due to the fact that both he, xxxxx­xxxxxxx and xxxxxxxxxxxx were private fliers and AGENTS NOTES : xxxxxxxxxxxx is a man of 3 2frequently got together to talk shop. xxxxxxxxxxxx years o f age, being married and the father o f two chil­stated that as far as he was concerned anything xxxxx­ dren. He is well thought of in the community in whichxxxxxxx said could be taken very seriously and that he lives, being very much the family man and from allhe, xxxxxxxxxxxx actually believed that Mr. Arnold appearances a very good provider for his family. xxxx- 4
  7. 7. xxxxxxxx has recently purchased a xxxxxxxxxxxxxx­ age and achieved the rank of Eagle scout before I wasxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx in which to conduct his fourteen. My former scout executive was xxxxxxxxxx­ business to the extent of which is explained in the att­ xx now a xxxxxxxxxxxx for the Boy Scouts in Kansasached exhibit. I t is the personal opinion of the inter­ City, Kansas.v;::w er that xxxxxxxxxxxx actually saw what he stated As a boy, I was interested in athletics and was xxx­that he saw. It is difficult to believe that a man of xxx­ xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx I entered thexxxxxxxxx character and apparent integrity would U.S. Olympic trials in xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx­state that he saw obj ects and write up a report to the xxxxxxxxxxx I taught swimming and diving at scoutextent that he did if he did not see them. To go camps and the municipal pool in Minot, North Da­further, if xxxxxxxxxxxx can write a report of the kota. I went to the University of Minnesota, where Icharacter that he did while not having seen the ob­ swam and did fancy diving under xxxxxxxxxxxx andjects that he claimed he saw, it is the opinion of the also played football under xxxxxxxxxxxx but uponinterviewer that xxxxxxxxxxxx is in the wrong entering college I was unable to continue my footballbusiness, that he should be writing Buck Rogers fic­ career because of an inj ured knee. My high schooltion. xxxxxxxxxxxx is very outspoken and somewhat football coach was xxxxxxxxxxxx who is now xxxxxx­bitter in his opinions of the leaders of the U.S. Army xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx I had little or noAir Forces and the Federal Bureau of Investigation for finances, and my ambition in furthering my educationnot having made an investigation of this matter in college was through my athletics. As a boy in Mi­sooner. To put all of the statements made by xxxxxxx­ not, North Dakota, I did a good deal of dog sledxxxxx in this report would make it a voluminous vol­ racing. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxu me. However, after having checked an aeronautical In 1 938 I went to work for xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx­map of the area over which xxxxxxxxxxxx claims that xxxxx, a manufacturer of automatic fire fighting ap­he saw the objects it was determined that all state­ paratus. In 1 939 I was made xxxxxxxxxxxx for themments made by xxxxxxxxxxxx in regard to the dis­ over a part of the western states, and in 1 940 I estab­tances involved, speed of the obj ects, course of the l ished my own xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx­obj ects and size of the objects, could very possibly be xxxxx I have been working as an xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx­facts. The distances mentioned by xxxxxxxxxxxx in xxxxxxxx on xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx­his report are within a short distance of the actual dis­ xxxx.tances on aeronautical charts of this area, although My flying experience started as a boy in M inot,xxxxxxxxxxxx has never consulted aeronautical North Dakota, where I took my first flying lessonscharts of the type the Army uses. xxxxxxxxxxxx from xxxxxxxxxxxx who was originally from Greatstated that his business had suffered greatly since his Falls, Montana. Due to the high cost at that time, Ireport on july 25 due to the fact that at every stop on was unable to continue my flying and did not fly ofhis business routes, large groups of people were wait­ any great consequence until 1 940. I was given my pi­ing to question him as to j ust what he had seen. xxxx­ lot certificate by xxxxxxxxxxxx senior CAA inspectorxxxxxxxx stated further that if he, at any time in the of Portland, Oregon, and for the last xxxxxxxxxxxxx­future, saw anything in the sky, to quote xxxxxxxxxx­ xxxxxxxxxxxx covering my entire territory with samexx directly, "if I saw a ten story building flying and flying from forty to one hundred hours per monththrough the air I would never say a word about it", since. D ue to the fact that I use an airplane entirely indue to the fact that he has been ridiculed by the press my work, in january of this year I purchased a xxxxx­to such an extent that he is practically a moron in the xxxxxxx airplane, which is an airplane designed foreyes of the majority of the population of the United high-altitude take-offs and short rough field use.States. In the type of flying I do, it takes a great deal ofI Incl : Exhibit "A" practice and judgment to be able to land in most anyFRANK M. BROWN, S/ A, CIC 4th AF cow )>;lsture and get out without inj uring your air­ plane; the runways are very limited and the altitude is very high in some of the fields and places I have to goDOCUMENT NO. 4 in my work. To date, I have landed on 823 cow pas­ tures in mountain meadows, and in over a thousand SOME LIFE DATA xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx I hours a flat tire has been my greatest mishap.was born xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. My fathers The following story of what I observed over thename was xxxxxxxxxxxx was xxxxxxxxxxxx I was a Cascade mountains, impossible as it may seem, is posi­resident of M innesota until I was six years old when tively true. I never asked nor wanted . .. notoriety formy family moved to also homesteaded in Scobey, j ust accidentally being in the right spot at the rightMontana, and became quite prominent in political cir­ time to observe what I did. I reported something thatcles along with xxxxxxxxxxxx, the famous xxxxxxxx­ I know any pilot would have reported. I dont thinkxxxx. that in any way my observation was due to any sensi­ I went to grade school and high school at Minot, tivity of eye sight or j udgment than what is consid­North Dakota. I entered scouting at twelve years of ered normal for any pilot. 5
  8. 8. On June 2 4th, Tuesday, 1 94 7, I had finished my so clear that it was very easy to see obj ects and deter­ work for the xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx at Cheha­ mine their approximate shape and size at almost fifty lis, Washington, and at about two oclock I took off miles that day. from Chehalis, Washington, airport with the intention I remember distinctly that my sweep second hand of going to Yakima, Wash. My trip was delayed for an on my eight day clock, which is located on my instru­ hour to search for a large marine transport that sup­ ment panel, read one minute to 3 P.M. as the first posedly went down near or around the south-west obj ect of this formation passed the southern edge of side of Mt. Rainier in the state of Washington and to Mt. Rainier. I watched these objects with great inter- date has never been found. est as I have never before observed ........... s flying so I flew directly toward M t. Rainier after reaching an close to the mountain tops, flying directly south toaltitude of about 9,500 feet, which is the approximate ..... st down the hogs back of a mountain range. I wouldelevation of the high plateau from which Mt. Rainier estimate their .... tion could have varied a thousand feetrises. I had made one sweep of this plateau to the one way or another up or down ... they were prettywestward, searching all of the various ridges for this much on the horizon to me which would indicate theymarine ship and flew to the west down and near the were near the same elevation as I was.ridge side of the canyon where Ashford, Washington, They flew like many times I have observed geese tois located. fly in a rather diagonal chain-like line as if they were Unable to see anything that looked like the lost linked together. They seemed to hold a definite direc­ship, I made a 360 degree turn to the right and above tion but rather swerved in and out of the high moun­the little city of Mineral, starting again toward Mt. tain peaks. Their speed at the time did not impress meRainier. I climbed back up to an altitude of approxi­ particularly, because I knew that our army and airmatey 9,200 feet. force had planes that went very fast. The air was so smooth that day that it was a real What kept bothering me asl watched them flip andpleasure flying and, as most pilots do when the air is flash in the sun right along their path was the fact thatsmooth and they are flying at a higher altitude, I I couldnt make out any tail on them, and I am suretrimmed out my airplane in the direction of Yakima, that any pilot would j ustify more than a second lookWashington, which was almost directly east of my pos­ at such a plane.ition and simply sat in my plane observing the sky I observed them quite plainly, and I estimate myand the terrain. distance from them, which was almost at right angles, There was a DC-4 to the left and to the rear of me to be between twenty to twenty-five miles. I knewapproximately fifteen miles distance, and I should they must be very large to observe their shape at thatjudge, at 1 4,000 foot elevation. distance, even on as clear a day as it was that Tuesday. The sky and air was as clear as crystal, I hadnt In fact I compared a zeus fastener or cowling tool Iflown more than two or three minutes on my course had in my pocket with - holding it up on them andwhen a bright flash reflected on my airplane. It star­ holding it up on the DC-4 - that I could observetled me as I thought I was too close to some other quite a distance to my left, and they seemed smalleraircraft. I looked every place in the sky and couldnt than the D C - 4; but, I should j udge their span wouldfind where the reflection had come from until I looked have been as wide as the furtherest engines on eachto the left and the north of Mt. Rainier where I ob­ side of the fuselage of the DC-4.served a chain of nine peculiar looking aircraft flying The more I observed these obj ects, the more upset Ifrom north to south at approximately 9,500 feet el­ became, as I am accustomed and familiar with mostevation and going, seemingly, in a definite direction of all objects flying whether I am close to the ground orabout 1 7 0 degrees. at higher altitudes. I observed the chain of these ob­ They were approaching Mt. Rainier very rapidly, j ects passing another high snow-covered ridge in bet­and I merely assumed they were j et planes. Anyhow, I ween Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams, and as the fi rst onediscovered that this was where the reflection had was passing the south crest of this ridge the last obj ectcome from, as two or three of them every few seconds was entering the northern crest of the ridge.would dip or change their course slightly, just enough As I was flying in the direction of this particularfor the sun to strike them at an angle that reflected ridge, I measured it and found it to be approximatelybrightly on my plane. five miles so I could safely assume that the chain of These obj ects being quite far away, I was unable for these saucer like obj ects were at least five miles long. Ia few seconds to make out their shape or their forma­ could quite accurately determine their pathway due totion. Very shortly they approached Mt. Rainier, and I the fact that there were several high peaks that were aobserved their outline against the snow quite plainly. little this side of them as well as higher peaks on the I thought it was very peculiar that I couldnt find other side of their pathway.their tails but assumed they were some type of jet As the last unit of this formation passed the south­plane. I was determined to clock their speed, as I had ern most high snow-covered crest of Mt. Adams, Itwo definite points I could clock them by; the air was looked at my sweep second hand and it showed that 6
  9. 9. - <:( w C A r� I ll !I <.__.) 0 Lat 48 N <.__.) ll. s. � lL <._.; <:( o__ Lat 47 N Y �K I MA " FLYING (WINGED) • SEEN HERE Mt.HELENA 9, 671 ft. A sea 1e ( mi 1es) PEtiDL E TON 20 4L 60 80 100 •they had travelled the distance in one minute and after taking a last look at Tieton Reservoir I headedforty-two seconds. Even at the time this timing did for Yakima. ............ ght add that my complete obser-not upset me as I felt confident after I would land vation of these objects, which I .......... en follow by theirthere would be some explanation of what I saw. flashes as they passed Mt. Adams, was around two­ A number of news men and experts suggested that and-a-half or three minutes --, although, by the timeI might have been seeing reflections or even a mirage. they reached Mt. Adams ..... were out of my range ofThis I know to be absolutely false, as I observed these vision as far as determining shape or form. Of course,objects not only through the glass of my airplane but when the sun reflected from one or two or three ofturned my airplane sideways where I could open my these units, they appeared to be completely round ;window and observe them with a completely unob­ but, I am kaing (sic: for making) a drawing to the beststructed view. (Without sun glasses.) of my ability, which I am including, as to the shape I observed these objects to be as they passed the snow Even though two minutes seems like a very short covered ridges as well as M t. Rainier.time to one on the ground, in the air in two minutes When these objects were flying approximatelytime a pilot can observe a great many things and any­ straight and level, they were just a black thin line andthing within his sight of vision probably as many asfifty or sixty times. when they flipped was the only time I could get a j udgment as to their size. I continued my search for the marine plane for These objects were holding an almost constant el­another fifteen or twenty minutes and while searching evatio n ; they did not seem to be going up or comingfor this marine plane, what I had j ust observed kept down, such as would be the case of rockets or artilleryrolling through my mind. I became more disturbed, so shells. I am convinced in my own mind that they were 7
  10. 10. some type of airplane, even though they didnt con­ obj ects of similar shape and design as I described and form with the many aspects of the conventional type assured me that I wasnt dreaming or going crazy. of planes that I know. I quote xxxxxxxxxxxx a former Army Air Forces Although these objects have been reported by pilot who is now xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx­ many other observers throughout the United States, xxxxxxx, "What you observed, I am convinced, is there have been six or seven other accounts written some type of j et or rocket propelled ship that is in the by some of these observers that I can truthfully say process of being tested by our government or even it must have observed the same thing that I did; particu­ could possibly be by some foreign government". larly, the descriptions of the three Western/Cedar Anyhow, the news that I had observed these spread City Air Lines/,Utah employees, the/(pilot) gentleman very rapidly and before night was over I was receivingfrom Oklahoma City and the locomotive engineer in telephone calls from all parts of the world; and, to I llinois, plus xxxxxxxxxxxx and Co-Pilot xxxxxxxxx­ date I have not received one telephone call or one let­ xxx of United Air Lines. ter of scoffing or disbelief. The only disbelief that I Some descriptions could not be very accurate taken know of was what was printed in the papers. from the ground unless these saucer-like disks were at I look at this whole ordeal as not something funny quite a great height and there is a possibility that all as some people have made it out to be. To me it is of the people who observed peculiar objects could mighty serious and since I evidently did ...... some-have seen the same thing I did; but, it would have thing that at least Mr. John Doe on the street corner ·been very difficult from the ground to observe these or Pete .... ews on the ranch has never heard about, isfor more than four or five seconds, and there is always no reason that it does not exist. Even though I openlythe possibility of atmospheric moisture and dust near invited an investigation by the Army and the FBI asthe ground which could distort ones vision. to the authenticity of my story or a mental or a physi­ I have in my possession letters from all over the cal examination as to my capabilities, I have receivedUnited States and people who profess that these ob­ no interest from those two important protective forcesj ects have been observed over other portions of the of our country; I will go so far as to assume that anyworld, principally Sweden, Bermuda, and California. report I gave to the United and Associated Press and I would have given almost anything that day to over the radio on two different ocasions which appar­have had a movie camera with a telephoto lens and ently set the nation buzzing, if our Military Intelli­from now on I will never be without one - but, to gence was not aware of what I observed, they wouldcontinue further with my story. When I landed at the be the very first people that I could expect as visitors.Yakima, Wash., airport I described what I had seen to I have received lots of requests from people whomy very good friend, AI Baxter, who listened patiently told me to make a lot of wild guesses. I have basedand was very courteous but in a j oking way didnt be­ what I have written here in this article on positivelieve me. facts and as far as guessing what it was I observed, it is I did not accurately measure the distance between j ust as much a mystery to me as it is to the rest of thethese two mountains until I landed at Pendleton, Ore­ world.gon, that same day where I told a number of pilot My pilots license is xxxxxxxxxxxx I fly a xxxxxxx­friends of mine what I had observed and they did not xxxxx it is a three-place single engine land ship thatscoff or laugh but suggested they might be guided is designed and manufactured at Afton, Wyoming asmissiles or something new. In fact several former an extremely high performance, high altitude airplaneArmy pilots informed me that they had been briefed that was made for mountain work. The national certi­before going into combat overseas that they might see ficate of my plane is xxxxxxxxxxxx Is/ NOW THAT THINGS ARE STARTING TO "HOT UP" ON ALL SIDES, WITH LIDS BLOWING OFF AND CATS PEEPING OUT, WHY CONTINUE TO BE SO SCARED OF TELLING ALL YOUR FRIENDS ABOUT FLYING SAUCER REVIEW? YOU KNOW VERY WELL THAT WE HAVE BEEN RIGHT, ALL ALONG, SINCE FSR WAS ESTABLISHED 32 YEARS AGO! 8 J
  11. 11. · ·_:Office Memorandum • UNITED STATES GOVERNMEl. rTO- .. -� · ·· " �. s ·A� ;0�.· : •• ·; � �JECTs E..PO?.IS CF. YLYTIW DISCS SECURITY llAITU - X ..:, ":947. - .;. .... ;. , ( � . � Refor San Francirsco lotter cinted Sept.c:r.bcr 4, _ _ .. _� .:-_ _ .._,_·.� >= . . ... ·. . . c: �-�-of_ , ,_e.;-!.-,_t:*� 7� ::::----�- - · : ..:�.� .... · - . ; .• -��..-.� �.; o.:.:;; ::: . .. ;;::.!�•, �� .. ..._. · .:._· --.....· �?�:W:::- .-....J, Port.l.e.nd, reported -.� . . . . . . ·- . __ _ .;..-,.; ... � . rlthout c.:>nsulti.I"4; an,y rc:c:>:-as t.hat on J�"1e 2.4, lJ47, t1hile pr-os,?ecti...n,£ at � . : · . p-..">int. :i.i1 th� Cascade l:ou.r-.t.ai."ls epprox:imzl.tely five thousand feet fro� sea l6V""-:.11. · · dUTi.n.g the u_.fte:-noon he noticed � r€ilection, looked op, n.nd Ga";f a disc pro­ coeding in n coutheasterly � cti� . !rncediately upon BightL� this object -e he place:j hil3 telescope to h.is eye �nd observed the disc for .:;.pproxir..ate.l.;r !ort.y-five t.O cixty cecond�. He re:::::.3.ri<ed that it is possiblG for h.ir: to pick up an object at r. dista.""lce of t.en rllles rlth h.i.!s telescope. �t the ti...::� t�. · : . - disc was td.ghtc:l. b7 !Lr. C_¥� it tyaS ba.nki.n.g ir. the t;llnJ ll.nd he observ� · !iva or t;:iY. oicl..l.ar objects but only concentrated on one. He rel..at.erl t.hAt they did not !".ly .in a.�v particcla.r .for::laticn a.11d that he l:Ould Gstbate thsi.r height. to b3 �bout one thousc.nd .!�t !ror: �ioere he l!:a.s nt;;::.d.in.g. He c.aid the Cbjoct �ts �bout thirty feet. in d.i.ameter�c.nd a.p��"d t.o h3.•--e e. tall. l.t � --· . i . no ooil5e. l., c-�;!t vid.clty I .tccordlll.g to he ren.ain&d in the o! the CasC!lci..o3 . � ior Be"craJ. d..s.ys s.nd then returned t..o Port.land .�nd noted c..n s..rticle in � · local psper �hich r;tat.ed L1 Ctffect. t!.l.a.:t. :l man in Boize, Ic..aho, had sighted A ;:·i.-:-J.lar objzct but thst. �ut.hcritic� had discla1-·.:ed flilY knc;-:..leC:..ge of sv.c.� ru1 oojoct. He t"�.id ha COO::::IJ-lica.ted rlt.h the Jt.r:::v- :for the s l e pl.ll"pC!;C or atte.:Ipt­ o � t.o edd czedence to t.ho story !Urni�hed by t�H:) 1::Wl in Boi!Ja. cr::::::::!aal.so related t.h.at. en the " . � .. occasion or hi.s r;ig.1tine the objec t.8 · · · on cD:Dbin.at.ion co::?a�t �d -ra.tch. He Juno 21., l. 947 he had in t-ti!3 pos&e��ion n . n:>tod p.a.rt.iculc.:-ly thAt i.!:wed.iately tretoro he cighted t.he disc the cc::;t..s:; ---.:-: · �cted ve:-y pcculiJ:>..r, Uio h.:nd �avin:; fro:l one side to t.."ls dha, but tb.E.t t:-..i..& � _._..·. .. · condition corrected itself :....r:n5�t.aly :Ute:- the d.iscs had passed out o! lti.ght. Inforca.nt c:ppGll.rOO t.o be � very reliable inc:lividu.U mo z.dvi�d t.r..at ·. he had been � prospecto:- in the �t.r.tes of i!ontana.1 T;ash.inf;Uln, �-1d Oregon for tho past !ort.y pan;. . ·--· -� ... . . · . ·- -. FJS:lal! . { 62-29.38) . 62-1531 . 2 cc: San • Franci:sco · ... -� ·-.. ·.. 1 ·:-��:-. ��:!. ;· ": .( . . _:: " - . :. . ·. 9
  12. 12. I r < (_j e n t 1 , 2 1 2 08 I/ 1 13 . Ju l y 1 0 4 7 1. Cn 1 2 ._Tu l y 1 � 1 7 , t c " l l tn :: rr. t de rt t U: � r.�!., �� ce o f f!i f:. he " I dt ho !.: a i l y 3 t; r t. C" �:-·" n , ".! o t :; C , _ l c..l dtc . Tlw � �c__;.:__7 -- �- �-J o f t he. knew ("=��-�:� of �tJ i S 9 1 T dn h o , s. nu a s t o t he c r e d i b i l i ty of ·· f npe r , c·--� -- · · -:-·:-�:=-=��-:l , t:l s i nt e r v i c�:cC:. 1 n re Gil rd to h e � .,..- e l l he fny s tn t. <;-:.en t T(1 c l e ,, � - c�":---�7 Th"! !1 U r � c l S 6 () : L i d . 9 i n t e r v i e w � s a n a t t e "•it t:o ve r i fy s tn t� r. o n t s �":� fl d e ��:.· C_:� · · =�::;:--:-:::J!I o n 2 6 Ju ne 1 94 7 , to vE. r i C l l S nt� t i ono l n e w � :; c r v i. c o � t.. o t h e e f fe c t. t h a t h e , C� hnd s -:- e n 9 ob� e c t � f l �r i n � i n t.he n i r n h ove thcs r a s c e de Uo u n t e i n R a n g� / ? of 7e ,� h i !1 r,ton . ihe s e ob,j c c t s we r e s u b s eq•..: IJ T i t l y r e f e r r e d t o a s flying !J ��::-: .�_-_:;)... :; t. f t e d t h r- t he h R d kn o v.n ��- --� for � � u c e � s �r f l y l n � � � � k s n nd w i l l h e r � -i n -a f � e r be r e f e r r e d to � s s u c h quite a r e r i o d C ft i .-,e , l ta v i n r. had r c l n t i on � wi.f":h (�: _._-,.·=�� ·:�-:! o n va r i ou s tn t h i s r � po rt . c:-- O C Ctt � i o r. s , due t o t he ft C t t hn t bo t h }H! 1 �··;.�·· • · J A nd C._..:_.: .:�:-: :.� :_""":7- s t e t o d t h A t A s f e r r:. :-; h·� Tra s r. o n c c rn F. d A ny t 1 t l n r, t;::::.=:� s � i d o o u l d b e t;e ro ;:> d l A t e f l i e r s t� nd f r e -:•1 c n t l�· r;o t t o r; c � . h e r to t A l k s �to p . ,. G-�-� a c. t u a _l_ly _h n l i e ve d that � :r . Ar n o l d �1!1 <! � 1) � 1 1 t h e ,. r l r CJr<J r. t i � n c ·J l" .l ? I ll � d � r. k s . c . � s t a t e d t r.:- r. n ve ry s e r i o u s l y n nd t r. � t h-:! , _ art".) r c::�� that o f 4; i t-J (! n p c r l::.Hl n s :: i :ne d h i n , <:!�� t h� f S S : [Tlr"1e n t o f t c. k i r.g t ho r o rt) rt c d r:e v i n :-; � J � n th3 f l :-r i n r. d ." � k s , t ha t t h e e d i to r . : r : l r · w b � l o n;: i n r, t" t h o: !l"! ::S p !"l. :: : r r.n . : c �: h:� u � t i n r. � 1 1 � !fo r t s t o p r ove The ro su l t s c r i.l . i s e s :; i r:n� �C):1t to c _:::=_� !. n d what or • H s :-- t·ove th� ? r c- � r b .i l i t :· o f fl:· t n � c H s � s h� ·: i n [ b � t· n s e e n in the C";::ci._�i! r�ort �mt? :: t: a r c n . ,. he s u� s�·quen t ly snt-.• :_ s p u t l"o r t. h � ·t a swo 1·n s t e t e!T"I �nt s i f;:1e d by n ttr. ch·� d to t h i s r e p r) rt a·s ·:x hib it o:$ • c:-:2:.-J ""Te r:• r e s< rvn d t :po o ! r> e r s o n . � Af.�!T S ;:c-1::3 : is n J · - n o r" n�p 1·ox i�nt c l :r 33 to 35 yea.r s of n ;-:-, . ! • 1":1 a l l � r. ? o � rn n c c .o; is / I t_.., £�1n � l o r:Gc-d ? �00 hou r ::� or f l :.•i n [. t i ::-1,.. tn vn r l o u s t;rp e � of a i r p l a ne s �;:-;; ·.��� �"��; i.:u���G �:::��� �i��·.:���;:r:� t il gI �.�e1 t i o t h tT!:AAF r. n d s t:-. t i o n� d <n ; i. u i a n I s l !. n d , i n t }:� Pa c i f i c . It " /) ?-. · 1-hE> t h� i s t h � � � r � o n � l o p i n i o n o r t h e i n t e rv i ��:e r t hA t �.;.;:!.:it a ct u a l ly saw ��::;:::� , t n t e l!: th:1 t h � S tl t:" i n t i �� P. t tn ,. h e d J r. ? c- t · t . It is a l s o t he op i n i on O f tho. i n t e r v i Cie r t ! a r t "." O I I l d h:- ve "11.1 � h l"Ore t o l o s e t h e n (;B i ll ! nd K U l cl P ft V E: t o h e ff:j ry s t r o n r-: 1: conv i n c o d tht• t he n c tu e. l l y s a w :: ome t h i n g be for� r r:.- <:-!ou l d r " :.<" rt s · , c h n n i. n c i u c r. t r n J o p , n h m s e l ! fCr t he r i di cu l e t l a n t ··. :cn. l d n c c o:-:tpn n:: s t t c h r. r e ! o r t . 1 l nc l : h rh t h i t " R" ::-r. .• i t ., • "1 0 .:; , Sf:... , . ClC tf !. h Al 10
  13. 13. . . -../ J In d d o n t • . 4 .. F l 2 C8 I · , 1 6 Ju l y 1 9 4 7_ . . . . ... .• .. : -.:....... ·: . < .. :. · . .7)-� . �Tu ly .::.:.�:��.::.-<· �� ! r • . I � ·. :.. r-- ·;"f7. ·:·::. �· t h.s t . • .. . . IJ y­ . 1. On 1 21�4 7 , L. ·, ; : :· : :�;:;· , • • Bo i s e , I d e h o . .... lrn. � 1 n t e r v 1 �llo d t n r e r,.:1. rd t o t, h o rc �ort.; :>y f · . . : · · . h o � n• fJ c·.-:...;...:_ .:..,_::::> v oltmts ri ly s t r s n ee o b j o c t � f l:ri n � " v o r t l1 e Ca :-: c " d o : !o u ri:.ulr1"i.n.t;o o f �ia s h i n ;t c n July St e. t o o n 25th . A (,r e e d to r;i VO t h e i n t e rv i o vu r report n,e O"i.tten r e [.> o r t o :i.__.;::;,;·;�:�� t c.. t t� c�o d a wr i t t e n o r e x :l c t l y v;:1 A t h r h n d S O O n e n t h o e. b o V O me n t i on e d d� t o . to t H ) r e ;:>o r t as L.xh ib i t A c [-��: ::> 1 -; a. o r �- ;;;- -�! : i 1 ;;: . ro ,n conr.r..mi ty Ar;O:! :i N0T S-.j : o f �2 )"C II. r s o r f r,o , bo i :JG r.ar r i e d o..n d 1:t n t�o r�t hc r i s ·:o l l t ho u rht o r 1 n t h e in frOM nll t1:hi c h ho 1 1 VO !Y 1 b o i � � Vt: r;, MU Ch t h e rn ., i l �r l: n n A n d 8?p O a. ra. n c o 8 ll ve ry r,o o 1 !l r c v i c ·� r r o r h i s rP n i l S • ��.J;e.s ro �o_:;- l :o.• purcha.�ed A ���h:{�u�t.rj�,���� �-u-��i��?tor��;n:!�o��r���� � c� I t i s t he r�r �onal o p i n i on of tho i nt e rv 1 c w o r t h e t � £=���r;�i-r?;�e h � czs�� lc f;•J l l ly a t t� c h� d e x h i � i t . o f <:.��-� - ·.!�-�che.rn ct e r t� nd a !l p e. r e n t 1 n t e c r 1 ty t10ul d 1 t & t s "fh f t he s t !lt e d t he t he S n "tT It i t d i � f i c u l t to b e l l" TO . r; e. w . t.h 11 t a ne n lo ��� A n th�t h e ��" ob j e c t s� n d �T i t e u p e rc �o rt t o t h e e x t e nt t h a t he di d i f h o did not seo them. r:o fu r the r , i f ,;r i t e a rep o r t o f ·the -t;u. t C _. :,�::. �� �.: � eherncter t l 1 r t h fl d i d wit i l � n o t h e vi n r: s e � n t. t 1 P. � : � -:- -: : -, t};r.t h e c .!. � i =e d �5 ��-:;:::"}i tt If _f; e.!" · it i s thl" o p � n i <:l n o r t he i n t e r v 1 -; r.c r __ i n t h e ""T o n.::; l b u :J i n e s s . H : n t he s : 1n u l d b� -:tr i t i n � U. , c-lc ?. o c� r c; f i c t i c n . {y v Vt> lJ o u t s p o r3 n A n r3 � IJ n O &. ! t b 1 t � c r t n h i s O f- l n i o n s o ! t h o l e a d e r s o f th� U . 3.• A r,:y i. l r fo r c c 3 • nd �hP. fo c! e r " l �u re e u ..,r I n v � s t 1 t:�>- t i o n ro r not ho rl t: z:: tna d o e n i nv c � u ,. � t t C n o f t h i s cm t t e r s Nm e r , lo n u t e l l of t h o t> t n. t �J ::Y.) n t :: > · ne de by C:::::>.:..:� i 1 thi e report ho u l d r: � h 1 t c - v o lurni n o u n YJl,�:_::- ·2 :.t; .1)":_":. o :- . �,.. e ft e r h r v i n r: c h e c k e d n n a e r o na u t i e l l lll" P o f t h e are� over "h i c h.r:""----=- -� -... _ .:,_ �<-< �:. :.;:� i n <: 8pood oou r� ..., s t ! , n t h e s a"N tl 1 c ob j o c t s ! t � s :3 s t o :- m 1 n o d th" t & 1 1 s b. t e mo nt 15 -::: � d e by ol r e r;a rd t o the d h t ,.. n e c e t �v C lvc d , o f tho ob j o ct s: , c�::.� 1 n .: r · t he o l>j o c t s e n d n i r.. e of t ho olJjects, cou l u � e ry p o � s i bly � e fc. ct 8 . T.M c.l thou�h {";-� !rJ [ d i � t f.I O C C :" �e n t i on o d t-:· h l ! r e p o rt a r e lli t h i !t &. short t! i s t ll O C � . o � t l 1., o c t u n l d i s t ll n � :; c.n l o r�>nP u t i ea l c � rt .s o f thi s c. r e k , �r;�v� t 111 tod e: �:�J.n ., �· � n e v e r con :; u l t o d � e r o n n u t i c e l c hC r t s o t t h e t :-?e t h e J.. nn y u � e a . _ t h :-1 t h � s bu � i no s ! h " <l . s u ffo r o d ::ron t ly e in c fl h i a r e p o rt · on Ju l y 2 5 d u e to t h e r� ct t h � t ft t e �c ry s t o p on h l. s hu 5 1.�o s s rou t e s , l e.n;e r rnu :- � nr p o o r l , -wfl r n n: d t l :1 r, t. o 1 H c :; t 1 Nt hi1: r 5 to ju :; t lYhn t ho }la d c e e n . � �., t:�ri c...���-:!. ilc etly. ru r � h ., r t : ,-. t 1 ! !lc , n t any t i � i n the fu ture , &1.-rt" n n:rt h i n(; i - t tho s �: . to qu o t e 11 i f I ZI R IT £ tou s t o ry bu i l di ng . _. -; � ·. f ly ine; _ I w o u l :1 n c v o r s o y a "o r d t h r o u 1�h t � o e ir i t " , due t o the nJou� · f a c t U : 11 t h<J hA s b f.l o n r i : H c u b d b:: t h " p ro � s t o !l U C h o n e x t e n t thA t he . _ ./ i s p r e c t i c o l 1 y e. mo r o n i n t he � y e s o f t h e mA j o r i ty o f t he p o p u l � t i o n o f t h e Un i t � d S t a t e s . 1 Inol t F.xh ibi t " J!t �T7:-:L . �t ., . . �r,. -r- !.J;" ��J. �. �· ;., • J 11
  14. 14. - . /1 . f -+- . ------ • -�- 1 .r;·_ . ·. --- · .• · .. , ?-·7 __!::: -- - �n " c:a �o �.k.e.Jc.h es 9/ #L /.h- ,.., o./ d J s {J 1="0.9 {pAo/-os�t} - - .. _ - ._._ _ _ .. · f. l/2ll th They s o e m e d l t: ,.t e r thnn -;-ri d e , t he i r t hl c kno s s vm s �·)ou t o r the i r wi dth T h e y seemed l o n g e r than wide, t h e i r t h ickness w a s about 1h o t h of t h e i r w i d t h M i rror Bright : !f r r o r � r i �:h t They d i d not appear to me to w h i rl o r spin b u t di� not � ;��� � ;�; ;��;� seemed i n fi x ed pos i tion, travel i n g a s I h a v e made Thc.y n ppcar t o · cl r · g x x !:1e ".; o r.h i r l �r - p in bu t p o :. i t i o n ., C::*:����"":::=::JJ ::£ / tro ve l l llf" as I h o ve rn f d e d rfl l" l n r. . &, �:.a:-5 , ll!l·�,._ � ..! J. �.� · :_.-a:s: <. KJCLOSE S I GHTING BY PORTU G UESE AIRFORCE P I LOTS (NOVEM BER 1 982)Jose Sottomayor and Antonio Rodrigues(C. N . I.F.O. UFO Investigation Group, Lisbon)(Precis Translation from Portuguese)We are much indebted to our esteemed Portuguese Consu ltant, Sr. Joaquim Fernandes, of the Portuguese UFOInvestigation Group C . N . I . F . O . for send ing us this lengthy and pai nstaking report on a recent event in his country.Owing to our lack of space we regret that we can only g ive the salient details of it. He and other senior membersof C. N .I.F .O . were able to d iscuss the case subsequently, in a private interview, with General B rochado M iranda,C hief of Staff of the Portuguese Air Force, a fact clearly emphasising the entirely serious view which that AirForce takes of this very typical U FO slghting. - EDITOR His episode occurred in fine bright daylight, bet­ Lt. ].M.G., flying at an altitude of aroundTween 1 050 and 1 1 50 hrs on the morning of No­ 1 500- 1 600 m. over Maxial, saw a shining object be­vember 2, 1 982 in the region between Torres Vedras low, seemingly very close to the ground (maybe at 50and the Serra df Montejunto (mountain range). That or l OOm., he thought) moving on a N-S course. Just asis to say, in an area j ust to the north-west of Lisbon, he had decided that it would be a good thing to con­and over the Province of Estremadura. tinue to watch it, it suddenly changed behaviour, as The sky was clear, with unlimited visibility and though realizing his presence, and in ten seconds itlittle wind. In terms of index of strangeness it is graded shot up to the same height as himself, which wouldas 2, and in terms of index of credibility as 3. mean that it had risen at about 504 km.p.h. As indicated, the total sighting time was about 25 It then commenced to fly around him in greatminutes, and two Portuguese Air Force trainin g sweeps, and he was obliged to perform a series of tightplanes were involved, with pilots aboard them. These curves accordingly, so as to keep track of it. It wasmen, Pilot Lt. ].M.G., Ensign C.G., and Ensign A.G., now near enough for him to see that it was round andwere flying in Canadian-built Chipmunk DHC- 1 «resembled a hall of mercury ". It consisted of two hemi­primary training craft and came from OTA Air Base spheres (the lower one being reddish), metallic, shin­No. 2. ing, and with a circular dark area at the centre of its 12
  15. 15. Then finally, the UFO made a sweep, passing very near to J.M.G., and dashed off towards the slopes of the Serra de eintra Range, lying to the south-west, and vanished from sight. Back at Base, the three witnesses agreed that the qbject could not possibly have been a "balloon", and was clearly intelligently controlled. As mentioned above, their general accounts agree, though not all of the three pilots had quite the same clear view of the central "grid" around the obj ect, or (- - - - - - - - - -> of its lower dark circular centre. While two of them mentioned a system of "ribs" on the lower half of the obj ect, the third did not, and A.G.s account and sketch of it showed it rather as "cylindrical", withbase. Around the edge, where the two "hemispheres" rounded ends, like a capsule, although he admits thatmet, he thought he could distinguish some sort of pro­tuberance or irregularity. The obj ect reflected the sun­light brightly, and, as will be seen later, the final esti­ I . mate of its diameter set it at around two metres. Lt. J.M.G. reported to his Base what he was seeing, -- � . . ,� ) ,. A .:/. . - - "a ball of mercury". Various other pilots in the ---vicinity picked up his message and there was somemutual badinage, with suggestions that he was seeinga balloon, or even a football, or that he had "been atthe bottle". To which he retorted that it would be apretty remarkable "balloon" or "football" that couldshoot up from 1 00 metres to 1 500 metres in secondsand then fly rings around him at a fantastic speed.And that silenced the chatter . . . The UFO was now flying vast circles around him,estimated by him to have a perimeter of 2 1 ,000metres and to be 6,000 to 8,000 m. in diameter, overthe area between Torres Vedras and Montej unto.J.M.G. himself was flying in tight rings with a perime­ this may have been due to perspective. But A.G. waster of about 1 ,500 metres, and diameter of 450 metres, piloting, and was therefore obviously unable to view itand at a speed of 1 7 0 km.p.h. He estimated the speed as well as his companion, C.G. did.of the UFO at over 2,500 km.p.h. At no time did he observe any effects on his instru­ments or upon himself. The other two eyewitnesses, Ensign e.G. and En­sign A.G., arrived on the scene, also in a Chijnn wzktrainer, at about 1 1 .05 a.m. Their description of theobj ect agrees largely with that of J.M.G., namely that N OTI C E TOit seemed metallic, of a rounded shape, with tworaised convex areas and a "grid" around the centre. FSR SU BSC R I B ERSThis "grid", they thought, emitted very intense"flashes", which they did not feel were due to sunlight, Now that the E . E . C . regu lations oninasmuch as the "flashes" seemed to be reddish on paper producti on have taken fu l lone side and green on the other side, and thus re­ effect, o u r pri nters are no longer ablesembled rather electrical discha rges. They duly reported to Base that they too had the to buy paper of the same size asobj ect in view. The object continued to fly around for previous ly.about ten minutes or so. At one moment it passed bet­ Consequently, begi n n i ng withween the two aircraft, and e.G. was able to observe as Vo l u me 33, No. 1 , our jou rnal wi l lit came in front of ].M.G.s plane, and he was thus appear i n the larger A4 format.able to arrive at an estimate of its width - namelyabout two metres. (The "Ch ijmnm k " trainer is 7 . 7 5 m.long and 1 0.46 m. wide). 13

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