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E-diplomacy

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E-diplomacy: Internet a factor of changing environment, topics on diplomatic agenda, and tool for delivery of diplomatic activities

E-diplomacy: Internet a factor of changing environment, topics on diplomatic agenda, and tool for delivery of diplomatic activities

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  • Thank you Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen, It is a great pleasure for me to be with you today. New York Launch is part of the E-diplomacy initiative by Diplo, which consists of series of online debates and conferences with Malta conference on Training in e-diplomacy as a major event. 10 days ago we had launched our fist event in Brussels and yesterday our second event n Washington. After New York, next two events will be in Geneva and Vienna. The daily work and practice in E-diplomacy and our initiative are aimed at sharing experiences. I would like to stress that there is no one single recipe or way to use e-tools in diplomacy. Each of us has developed ways to use e-tools to work more efficiently and effectively. It is the reason why we would like to highlight sharing experiences in e-diplomacy. Each of you can tell your own story how you have acquired e-skills while working in diplomatic services. Please do not hesitate to share your experiences today with us today or during our forthcoming online debate.
  • This is reported to have been the reaction of Lord Palmerston when he received the first telegraph message in the 1860’s. Every major new technological development has promoted a reaction similar to Lord Palmerston’s: the radio, the telephone, the Internet,…
  • After the end of the Cold War, more non-state actors are involved in IR. From multilateral settings, international meetings become increasingly multistakeholder settings. Non-state actors are coming from corporate and civil society sectors; formally internal actors, become now international actors. Businesses and civil society are communicating internationally between and among each other. Globalization process had put into question national borders; state, corporate sector and civil society are all engaged in cross boarder activities, cooperation, exchange, managing projects collaboratively. Globalization has also put into question distinction between foreign and domestic policy; State and non-State actors (corporate sector and civil society) are active within national economy as well as on a international scene. This is often referred to as ‘deep integration of national economies’ and rising influence of the non-state actors on diplomacy. Often, in order to have a credibility at home, civil society actors would engage internationally and work collaboratively on a global scale. Thus, through involvement of non-state actors on international scale, domestic affairs became increasingly inter-connected and inter-dependent across the globe.
  • Every new technological and social development eventually brings new political, legal, and economic issues that need to be addressed either at the national or the international level, or both. The telegraph, the telephone, radio, the satellite, and the Internet followed, more or less, a similar pattern in becoming a “topic on the diplomatic agenda.”
  • In a globalized world, all issues (health, trade, migration, human rights, etc.) are inter-connected, inter-related and inter-dependent. In order to manage these issues today (climate change, swine flue, aids, etc.) and their future implications, the global governance approach is per definition a multidisciplinary exercise. Multidisciplinary approach is a setting in which professionals from different disciplines meet, mingle and engage in collaborative efforts to manage the issue of their concern together. They all need to be aware of their different professional cultures in order to communicate effectively and negotiate. Professionals coming from horizons as different as natural science (climate change), computer science (Internet governance), health (HIV AIDS, malaria, ) meet and cooperate with professionals from policy making, legal environment, social sciences. Their collaboration depends on their proper communication which is not always smooth and straight forward. Global Health is “wicked problem” (unique, have no definitive formulation, can be considered symptom of yet another problem) Limitation of problem – solution approach (complex interdependence resist simple problem – solution; one “solution” can trigger another problem
  • Academics and practitioners do not look at the same issue from the same perspective; they are using different lenses while talking on the same issue. While academics are looking to ‘explain’ the issue, practitioners ‘deal’ with the issue focusing to achieve the best possible outcome. Though the communicational gap between professional cultures cannot be abolished, it can be ‘bridged’ with mutual understanding of each other professional culture.
  • National culture shapes all individuals socialized in a give country and culture, its dominant values and language. National identity frames all other identities; Due to socialization, it comes in life before “organizational” and “professional” cultures. Individuals -- as citizens -- pay loyalty respectively to their “nation-state”. 2. Organizational culture shapes individuals with identity and values proper to institution or corporation in which professionals are working. Employer requires individuals to comply and identify with corporate values and promote them while working for corporation. Individuals -- as employees -- pay their loyalty respectively to their “institution” or “corporation”, being their employer. 3. Professional culture shapes individuals with identity and values proper to the vocation in which they have been trained. Individuals have a symbolical attachment to their vocation their exercising and give it a credit often for lifetime. Individuals -- as professionals -- pay their loyalty to their “vocation” for which they have been trained.
  • What diplomats do at daily basis? DiploFoundation has conducted the research and we have identified the following 8 areas of diplomats’ d daily work. Though it is not stipulated in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic relations 1961 (article 3), nevertheless it is reality of daily routine. As you can see, all our traditional core activities could be associated by e-tools. Negotiation is bread and butter of diplomacy. Drafting is usually the key part of negotiations. I am sure that most of you already have some experience in negotiating documents by using track changes and sometimes Wiki and that you experienced frustration of keeping track of correct version of negotiating document. Mind manager is a very good visualization tool that can help in preparing presentations or writing reports. Skype and other Internet telephony services are already used for negotiations and video-conferencing. Wikipedia became an online reference. By relying one the creativity and input of millions Wikipedia is increasingly reliable resource. Sometimes it is even better than traditional core analysis. Even if you do not have your diplomat on the spot in almost any country, you have Wikipedia contributor constantly providing first hand and updated information. Diplomats collect, verify and manage information. Third, communication is the key area of diplomacy. While representing their respective state, diplomats communicate with representatives of other countries, with the host state, with the media, with their own HQ. (What somebody said, what is blood for human body it is communication for diplomats. Without communication diplomacy does not exist.) Many diplomatic activities centered on events, being bilateral meetings, conferences, receptions or event like this one. As our colleagues from Maltese and Swiss mission can confirm, the organization of even simple events, like this one, involve a lot of communication and use of e-tools. Networking and Lobbying is essential part of promoting state interests, weather it is organizing receptions or promoting your candidate for the UN-function or corridor diplomacy. Diplomacy is usually associated with traveling and missions abroad, Even in the era of information society, diplomats travel and do missions as they used to do since our predecessor realised that it was better to negotiate than to fight. (Westphalia treaty, 1648). I am sure that you are spending long hours writing reports to your respective capitals. If I may say so. Reporting is one of the core diplomatic functions which are rarely thought in diplomatic services. When a diplomat joins diplomatic services he never think of becoming manager. But in reality, especially on higher levels of hierarchy, you have to manage people and resources. As you know it is not an easy task. The fact that embassies could be small does not reduce management complexities. On the contrary, you are expected to perform a multiple tasks at the same time. So, how should we use e-tools in all these activities? As you can see, all our traditional core activities could be associated by e-tools. I am sure that most of you already have some experience in negotiating documents by using track changes and sometimes Wiki and that you experienced frustration of keeping track of correct version of negotiating document. Mind manager is a very good visualization tool that can help in preparing presentations or writing reports. Skype and other Internet telephony services are already used for negotiations and video-conferencing. Wikipedia became an online reference. By relying one the creativity and input of millions Wikipedia is increasingly reliable resource. Sometimes it is even better than traditional core analysis. Even if you do not have your diplomat on the spot in almost any country, you have Wikipedia contributor constantly providing first hand and updated information.
  • What diplomats do at daily basis? DiploFoundation has conducted the research and we have identified the following 8 areas of diplomats’ d daily work. Though it is not stipulated in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic relations 1961 (article 3), nevertheless it is reality of daily routine. As you can see, all our traditional core activities could be associated by e-tools. Negotiation is bread and butter of diplomacy. Drafting is usually the key part of negotiations. I am sure that most of you already have some experience in negotiating documents by using track changes and sometimes Wiki and that you experienced frustration of keeping track of correct version of negotiating document. Mind manager is a very good visualization tool that can help in preparing presentations or writing reports. Skype and other Internet telephony services are already used for negotiations and video-conferencing. Wikipedia became an online reference. By relying one the creativity and input of millions Wikipedia is increasingly reliable resource. Sometimes it is even better than traditional core analysis. Even if you do not have your diplomat on the spot in almost any country, you have Wikipedia contributor constantly providing first hand and updated information. Diplomats collect, verify and manage information. Third, communication is the key area of diplomacy. While representing their respective state, diplomats communicate with representatives of other countries, with the host state, with the media, with their own HQ. (What somebody said, what is blood for human body it is communication for diplomats. Without communication diplomacy does not exist.) Many diplomatic activities centered on events, being bilateral meetings, conferences, receptions or event like this one. As our colleagues from Maltese and Swiss mission can confirm, the organization of even simple events, like this one, involve a lot of communication and use of e-tools. Networking and Lobbying is essential part of promoting state interests, weather it is organizing receptions or promoting your candidate for the UN-function or corridor diplomacy. Diplomacy is usually associated with traveling and missions abroad, Even in the era of information society, diplomats travel and do missions as they used to do since our predecessor realised that it was better to negotiate than to fight. (Westphalia treaty, 1648). I am sure that you are spending long hours writing reports to your respective capitals. If I may say so. Reporting is one of the core diplomatic functions which are rarely thought in diplomatic services. When a diplomat joins diplomatic services he never think of becoming manager. But in reality, especially on higher levels of hierarchy, you have to manage people and resources. As you know it is not an easy task. The fact that embassies could be small does not reduce management complexities. On the contrary, you are expected to perform a multiple tasks at the same time. So, how should we use e-tools in all these activities? As you can see, all our traditional core activities could be associated by e-tools. I am sure that most of you already have some experience in negotiating documents by using track changes and sometimes Wiki and that you experienced frustration of keeping track of correct version of negotiating document. Mind manager is a very good visualization tool that can help in preparing presentations or writing reports. Skype and other Internet telephony services are already used for negotiations and video-conferencing. Wikipedia became an online reference. By relying one the creativity and input of millions Wikipedia is increasingly reliable resource. Sometimes it is even better than traditional core analysis. Even if you do not have your diplomat on the spot in almost any country, you have Wikipedia contributor constantly providing first hand and updated information.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Excellencies, ladies & gentLmN, dEr guests gud aftRnun. It iz plSUR 2 b w UIntroduction 2day. Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 2. Whe n d o e s o ur s to ry s ta rt? Probably, when our ancestors discovered that:“It was better to hear the message than to eat the messenger.” Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 3. E v o lu t io n o f D ip lo m a c y : C o n t in u it y & C h a n g e Thousands years of the history of diplomacyJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 4. C o n t in u it y & C h a n g e “ M y G o d , t h is is t h e e n d o f d ip lo m a c y . ” R e a c t io n o f L o r d P a lm e r s t o n e w h e n h e r e c e iv e d t h e f ir s t t e l e g r a p h b a c k i n 18 5 0 s Lord PalmerstoneJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010 Ho we v e r …
    • 5. C o n t in u it y & C h a n g e To date, diplomacy has s u r v i v e d all these technological challenges. As a specific method for compromise and consensus d i p l o m a c y i s h e r e t o s ta y. The question is only, by w h o m , at w h a t l e v e l , h o w and t o w h a t e n d s it will be performed.Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 6. E V O L U T IO N o f M o d e r n D ip lo m a c y  Changes in the E N V I R O N M E N T for diplomatic activities  Introduction of N E W T O P I C S on diplomatic agendas  Introduction of N E W T O O L S for diplomatic activitiesJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 7. C h a n g in g E N V IR O N M E N T f o r D ip lo m a t ic A c t iv it ie s  Globalisation & Interdependence  Cable Geo-Strategy  New Actors – Inclusiveness  Disintermediation (“no need for the middle man”)  Need for “Global Sync”Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 8. In t e r d e p e n d e n c eJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 9. C a b le G e o -S t r a t e g yJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 10. N e w A c to rs- Facilitated by theInternet-basedcommunication- Beyond governmentsand political elites- Diplomats’ monopoly inforeign relations has beenundermined.- Need for dialogue withnew actors in diplomacy(broad enough – deepenough). Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 11. D IS IN T E R M E D IA T IO N WITH INTERMEDIARIES WITHOUT INTERMEDIARIES Will disintermediation affect diplomats?Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 12. N E E D F O R “ G L O B A L S YN C ”Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 13. NEW TOPICSJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 14. N E W T O P IC S o n D ip lo m a t ic Ag e nda s • Climate Change • Global Health • Internet Governance • Bio-diversity • Migration • …..Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 15. N E W T O P IC S o n D ip lo m a t ic Ag e nda s Multidisciplinary Nature of the New Topics Global Actions are Fragmented by Institutional Silos New Topics are “Wicked Problems” Increasing Importance of Science Dealing with Different Professional CulturesJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 16. Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 17. C O M M U N IC A T IO N G lo b a l G o v e r n a n c e - T h e o r y & P r a c t ic e Une a s y c o m m u n ic a t io n b e tw e e n: Academics, Scientists & Policy-makers, Lawyers, Diplomats &Corporate sector representatives & Civil society activists Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 18. N E W T O P IC S - D if f e r e n t P r o f e s s io n a l C u lt u r e s “On each side of the table, national culture and organisational culture unite while professional cultures divide. A cross the table, the situation is the opposite: national culture and organizational culture divide whereas professional culture may facilitate communication and agreement.” (Faure 1999)Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 19. D if f e r e n t C u lt u r e s N a t io n a l C u lt u r e O r g a n is a t io n a l C u lt u r e P r o f e s s io n a l C u lt u r eJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 20. L a y e r s o f P r o f e s s io n a l P r o f ile s Uniforms, visual codes, protocol and etiquette Language: Vocabulary & Jargon Referential framework, thinking paths, methodologies and approachesJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 21. NEW TOOLSJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 22. N E W T O O L S f o r D ip lo m a t ic A c t iv it ie s 1950s 2000sJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 23. M u lt it a s k in gJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 24. N E W TO O L S W E B 1. 0 ( w e b s i t e s a n d e - m a i l ) Huge amount of information Google-based knowledge How to get relevant and reliable information? W E B 2 . 0 ( w ik i, b lo g , s o c ia l n e t w o r k in g ) Centrality of the Text & Drafting Informal Communication Importance for Policy and Social Networking W e b 3 . 0 . ( V ir t u a l R e a lit y ) Virtual Embassy Virtual NegotiationsJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 25. Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 26. Mindmanager Google DesktopGoogle Docs Wikipedia Delicious Google Calendar Picasa Netvibes Google DesktopMindmanager WikipediaGoogle Docs Google Alerts Delicious Netvibes Google Desktop Wikipedia WikipediaGoogle Alerts Google Alerts Delicious Delicious Evite Mindmanager Doodle Skype Skype Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 27. C o n t in u it y a n d C h a n g e – F U TU R E ? N E E D F O R M O R E D I P L O M A C Y – representation of various entities; solving problems and conflicts in increasingly fragmented societies; new types of conflicts B Y W H O M – not only by official diplomatic services; new actors will emerge empowered by technology A T W H A T L E V E L – all levels of society with important interplay among global, regional, national and local levels H O W – mix of traditional approaches (negotiations) and online approaches (regular diplomatic activities) T O W H A T E N D – increasing blend of national and broader interestsJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 28. C o n t in u it y a n d C h a n g e – F U TU R E ? A F E W G R A D U A L T R A N S IT IO N S : - From a state craft to a management tool - From the management of order to the management of change - From a policy instrument to international process of social relationsJovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010
    • 29. C o n t in u it y a n d C h a n g e – F U TU R E ? Nothing is as constant as change – Heraklit THE MORE DIPLOMACY CHANGES, THE MORE IT STAYS THE SAME.Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation 2010