E diplomacy - e-tools

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Overview of e-tools for diplomats

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  • While we are discussing today, in this hour, XX new tools are uploaded at the Internet. They will join collection of close to 1 million e-tools available today, including 150.000 applications only for Iphone and Ipad. We have selected a few probably most familiar such as… How to select the right one out of million e-tools. There is no scientific criterion. It is usually matter of your specific need or recommendation of another user. If you have a need you will look for tools. But recommendation from your colleague may be a shortcut. It can save you time. It is the reason why we have started e-diplomacy initiative in order to provide space for sharing experiences with other users from the diplomatic community.
  • The problem for you, as well as for 2 billion other users of the Internet, is information overload. In your case it is event more important, since - being a diplomat - information is your key professional resource. You need to be constantly informed on issues you are working on, you are communicating, editing reports, lobbing. Your information should be well documented and reliable.
  • The problem for you, as well as for 2 billion other users of the Internet, is information overload. In your case it is event more important, since - being a diplomat - information is your key professional resource. You need to be constantly informed on issues you are working on, you are communicating, editing reports, lobbing. Your information should be well documented and reliable.
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  • What diplomats do at daily basis? DiploFoundation has conducted the research and we have identified the following 8 areas of diplomats’ d daily work. Though it is not stipulated in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic relations 1961 (article 3), nevertheless it is reality of daily routine. As you can see, all our traditional core activities could be associated by e-tools. Negotiation is bread and butter of diplomacy. Drafting is usually the key part of negotiations. I am sure that most of you already have some experience in negotiating documents by using track changes and sometimes Wiki and that you experienced frustration of keeping track of correct version of negotiating document. Mind manager is a very good visualization tool that can help in preparing presentations or writing reports. Skype and other Internet telephony services are already used for negotiations and video-conferencing. Wikipedia became an online reference. By relying one the creativity and input of millions Wikipedia is increasingly reliable resource. Sometimes it is even better than traditional core analysis. Even if you do not have your diplomat on the spot in almost any country, you have Wikipedia contributor constantly providing first hand and updated information. Diplomats collect, verify and manage information. Third, communication is the key area of diplomacy. While representing their respective state, diplomats communicate with representatives of other countries, with the host state, with the media, with their own HQ. (What somebody said, what is blood for human body it is communication for diplomats. Without communication diplomacy does not exist.) Many diplomatic activities centered on events, being bilateral meetings, conferences, receptions or event like this one. As our colleagues from Maltese and Swiss mission can confirm, the organization of even simple events, like this one, involve a lot of communication and use of e-tools. Networking and Lobbying is essential part of promoting state interests, weather it is organizing receptions or promoting your candidate for the UN-function or corridor diplomacy. Diplomacy is usually associated with traveling and missions abroad, Even in the era of information society, diplomats travel and do missions as they used to do since our predecessor realised that it was better to negotiate than to fight. (Westphalia treaty, 1648). I am sure that you are spending long hours writing reports to your respective capitals. If I may say so. Reporting is one of the core diplomatic functions which are rarely thought in diplomatic services. When a diplomat joins diplomatic services he never think of becoming manager. But in reality, especially on higher levels of hierarchy, you have to manage people and resources. As you know it is not an easy task. The fact that embassies could be small does not reduce management complexities. On the contrary, you are expected to perform a multiple tasks at the same time. So, how should we use e-tools in all these activities? As you can see, all our traditional core activities could be associated by e-tools. I am sure that most of you already have some experience in negotiating documents by using track changes and sometimes Wiki and that you experienced frustration of keeping track of correct version of negotiating document. Mind manager is a very good visualization tool that can help in preparing presentations or writing reports. Skype and other Internet telephony services are already used for negotiations and video-conferencing. Wikipedia became an online reference. By relying one the creativity and input of millions Wikipedia is increasingly reliable resource. Sometimes it is even better than traditional core analysis. Even if you do not have your diplomat on the spot in almost any country, you have Wikipedia contributor constantly providing first hand and updated information.
  • What diplomats do at daily basis? DiploFoundation has conducted the research and we have identified the following 8 areas of diplomats’ d daily work. Though it is not stipulated in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic relations 1961 (article 3), nevertheless it is reality of daily routine. As you can see, all our traditional core activities could be associated by e-tools. Negotiation is bread and butter of diplomacy. Drafting is usually the key part of negotiations. I am sure that most of you already have some experience in negotiating documents by using track changes and sometimes Wiki and that you experienced frustration of keeping track of correct version of negotiating document. Mind manager is a very good visualization tool that can help in preparing presentations or writing reports. Skype and other Internet telephony services are already used for negotiations and video-conferencing. Wikipedia became an online reference. By relying one the creativity and input of millions Wikipedia is increasingly reliable resource. Sometimes it is even better than traditional core analysis. Even if you do not have your diplomat on the spot in almost any country, you have Wikipedia contributor constantly providing first hand and updated information. Diplomats collect, verify and manage information. Third, communication is the key area of diplomacy. While representing their respective state, diplomats communicate with representatives of other countries, with the host state, with the media, with their own HQ. (What somebody said, what is blood for human body it is communication for diplomats. Without communication diplomacy does not exist.) Many diplomatic activities centered on events, being bilateral meetings, conferences, receptions or event like this one. As our colleagues from Maltese and Swiss mission can confirm, the organization of even simple events, like this one, involve a lot of communication and use of e-tools. Networking and Lobbying is essential part of promoting state interests, weather it is organizing receptions or promoting your candidate for the UN-function or corridor diplomacy. Diplomacy is usually associated with traveling and missions abroad, Even in the era of information society, diplomats travel and do missions as they used to do since our predecessor realised that it was better to negotiate than to fight. (Westphalia treaty, 1648). I am sure that you are spending long hours writing reports to your respective capitals. If I may say so. Reporting is one of the core diplomatic functions which are rarely thought in diplomatic services. When a diplomat joins diplomatic services he never think of becoming manager. But in reality, especially on higher levels of hierarchy, you have to manage people and resources. As you know it is not an easy task. The fact that embassies could be small does not reduce management complexities. On the contrary, you are expected to perform a multiple tasks at the same time. So, how should we use e-tools in all these activities? As you can see, all our traditional core activities could be associated by e-tools. I am sure that most of you already have some experience in negotiating documents by using track changes and sometimes Wiki and that you experienced frustration of keeping track of correct version of negotiating document. Mind manager is a very good visualization tool that can help in preparing presentations or writing reports. Skype and other Internet telephony services are already used for negotiations and video-conferencing. Wikipedia became an online reference. By relying one the creativity and input of millions Wikipedia is increasingly reliable resource. Sometimes it is even better than traditional core analysis. Even if you do not have your diplomat on the spot in almost any country, you have Wikipedia contributor constantly providing first hand and updated information.
  • E diplomacy - e-tools

    1. 1. DiploFoundation e-Diplomacy Overview: e-Tools
    2. 2. InternetDiploFoundation Source: http://internetdblog.blogspot.com/
    3. 3. Usage Communications e-Participation NetworkingDiploFoundation e-Learning Access to information Collaboration Sharing of content
    4. 4. Internet Stats  2 billion users (2011)  average user spends 14h/week  900 million USD for a single day is the maxDiploFoundation users spent for shoping  500 million websites online (2011)  5x1018 bytes (units of data) on Internet (2005) – “equivalent in size to all words ever spoken by humans since the dawn of time”
    5. 5. Fundamental E-Toolbox
    6. 6. DiploFoundation Information
    7. 7. Search Engines Over 70 billion searches done by users per month Tips: Examples: • word sequence ( “ “ ) www.google.com • boolean ( NOT, AND, OR ) www.bing.comDiploFoundation • forced word ( + ) www.altavista.com • wildcard ( * ) • synonim ( ~ ) • define filter ( define: ) • filters: allintitle, site, filetype, intext, inurl... Search Engine Optimisation Deep web ~ 400-550 times bigger with quality content over 1000 times greater than that of the searchable web
    8. 8. Deep web Surface web ~15% conventional search Deep web © Ed Gelbstein and Stefano Baldi Malta, February 2006
    9. 9. Information Overload• Need to be constantly informed• Increased amount of news available – Newspapers – Official Documents – Web 2.0 (Blogs, Facebook)• Difficulty to cope with flow of information• Need to concentrate and select News
    10. 10. News aggregation: RSS• RSS = Really Simple Syndication – To keep track of updates• Aggregator – To monitor several sites at the same time• Netvibes – An aggregator - To create your own reference page - To select relevant information - To access content easily Example: http://www.netvibes.com/diplosor
    11. 11. Open Encyclopaedia www.wikipedia.org 3,500,000 articlesDiploFoundation Collaborative work vs. reliability
    12. 12. DiploFoundation Communication
    13. 13. e-mail 250 billion e-mails exchanged daily around the globeDiploFoundation
    14. 14. Discussion ForumsDiploFoundation
    15. 15. Instant Messenger  Instant access  Multi-party participation  Allows multi-tasking  Additional features: video, voice, file sharing, desktop sharing...DiploFoundation Skype Windows Live MSN Yahoo Google
    16. 16. VoIP / Videoconferencing Voice-over-IP b) free online services (Skype) c) offers by Internet Service Providers d) “in-house” solutionsDiploFoundation Videoconferencing ... - high bandwidth demand (good Internet connection) - limited support for free services - limited quality and number of parties
    17. 17. DiploFoundation Telepresence
    18. 18. Blog (and Vlog) Over 126 million blogs (2009) Private http://bildt.blogspot.com/ vs.DiploFoundation professional http://carlbildt.wordpress.com/2009/10/10/viktiga-undertecknanden/ or http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2006/oct/23/internationalaidanddevelopment.su dan Should diplomats blog ?
    19. 19. Micro-blogging Twitter www.twitter.com 27.3 million of tweets on Twitter are posted per dayDiploFoundation
    20. 20. Social Reporting Live coverage: - uploaded videos - interviews - blogs - tweetsDiploFoundation - reports - photos - resources www.coveritlive.com http://igf2010.diplointernetgovernance.org/
    21. 21. Social Networks Facebook 900 million members... ...500 billion minutes monthly spending total over...DiploFoundation ...an average user has 130 friend connections... of candidates 25% for U.S. Senate have posted... (their own profiles (2006 ...Barack Obama leveraged online social networks to raise 55 million USD (2008)
    22. 22. Sharing Videos and Photos YouTube users upload almost 20 hours of video every minuteDiploFoundation Blip Flickr Picasa
    23. 23. DiploFoundation Webinars
    24. 24. Virtual WorldsDiploFoundation “Diplomacy Island” in Second Life
    25. 25. DiploFoundation Collaboration
    26. 26. Shared Documents Text (word), spreadsheet, internal sites...DiploFoundation
    27. 27. Wiki O n e M in u te W ik i W ik iW o rd W ikiW ikiDiploFoundation W ik iP ag e D r a m a tic In d e tity  Collaborative work W hyW ik iW o rks W ikiW ikiW eb  Non-linear structure  Hyper-links  Easily maintained  Comments and feedbacks
    28. 28. Hypertext AnnotationsDiploFoundation
    29. 29. Other Infrastructure:  Intranet databases  e-Government services  e-VotingDiploFoundation  Mobile device services (games, quizzes)  Geographic information system (GIS)  Enterprise resource planning (ERP)
    30. 30. The E-diplomat’s 2012 Toolkit Information Communication •Search engines (ex Google) •E-mail (ex Gmail, Yahoo!) •Wikis (ex Wikipedia) •Blogs (ex Wordpress) •Forums/communities (ex Ning) •Microblogs (ex Twitter) •Aggregators (ex iGoogle, Netvibes) •Video/photo sharing (ex Flickr, YouTube) •RSS feeders (ex Google Reader) •Social networks (ex Facebook, Ning, •Tagging (ex Delicious) LinkedIn) •E-mail alerts (ex Google Alerts) •Instant messengers (ex MSN, Skype, •Mind maps (ex Mindmanager) Gtalk)DiploFoundation •Personal home pages (ex Netbives) •VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) •Document reader (ex PDF) •Online storage (ex Dropbox) Representation Negotiations •RP and tele/videoconferencing (ex •E-mail (ex Gmail, Yahoo!) Webex) •Wikis (ex Wikispaces) •Instant messengers (ex Skype, Gtalk) •Online document editing (ex Google •Webinars (ex GVO) Docs, iEtherpad) •VoIP (ex Voipstunt) •Online calendars/planners (ex Doodle, Evite)
    31. 31. + E - Tools Diplomat at WorkWhat diplomats do at daily basis?
    32. 32. + E - Tools Diplomat at Work What diplomats do at daily basis?Mindmanager Google DesktopGoogle Docs Wikipedia Delicious Google Calendar Picasa Netvibes Google DesktopMindmanager WikipediaGoogle Docs Google Alerts Delicious Netvibes Google Desktop Wikipedia WikipediaGoogle Alerts Google Alerts Delicious Delicious Evite Mindmanager Doodle Skype Skype
    33. 33. DiploFoundation Questions?
    34. 34. DiploFoundation visit: www.diplomacy.edu/e-diplomacy www.diplointernetgovernance.org contact us: diplo@diplomacy.edu

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