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Future Thinking Project

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This is a project required to do by all Year 9 pupils at Hamilton Boys\' High School in NZ. It enables us to work with deadlines, manage our time, and practice good work habits. "It ams to …

This is a project required to do by all Year 9 pupils at Hamilton Boys\' High School in NZ. It enables us to work with deadlines, manage our time, and practice good work habits. "It ams to provide students with the foundation skills they need in order to become intelligent, autonomous learners. It enables students to develop the ability to think in new ways, to expand their reasoning processes, and to acquire skills that are essential to realising their full potential." - http://www.nzcer.org.nz/default.php?cpath=139_133&products_id=798


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  • 1. Architecture
    Andrew Sledger
    Hamilton Boys’ High School
    Proof-read by Parent/Caregiver: _
  • 2. Contents Page
    Title Page
    Contents Page
    Mind-map
    Timeline
    Classical Architecture
    Classical Example
    Modern Architecture
    Modern Example
    Practical Architecture
    Practical Example
    Sustainable Architecture
    Sustainable Example
    What I learnt
    Bibliography
    The Leadenhall Building
    London, England
  • 3. Mind Map
    Architecture
  • 4. Timeline of project
    Proof read slideshow 30th May
    Finish slideshow 30th May
    Print slideshow 2nd June
    Present slideshow 3rd June
  • 5. Classical
    Renaissance
    Greek
    Some materials used were:
    -Wood, used for supports and roof beams;
    -Plaster, used for sinks and bathtubs;
    -Unbaked brick, used for walls;
    -Limestone and marble, used for columns, walls, and upper portions of temples and public buildings;
    -Terracotta, used for roof tiles and ornaments;
    -Metals, especially bronze, used for decorative details.
    There were mostly five simple types of buildings: Religious, civic, domestic, funerary, or recreational.
    Hellenistic
    In the “Hellenistic” era, Greeks still built temples, but they built more big public buildings. They built more amphitheatres and places to exercise (gymnasia).
    Roman
    The Romans often used vaults and arches, and knew a lot about hydraulics and building materials in particular.
    Medieval
    Pre-Romanesque
    The primary theme during this period is the introduction of classical Mediterranean and Christian forms with Germanic ones creating innovative new forms
    Romanesque
    Romanesque is characterized by a use of round or slightly pointed arches, barrel vaults, and cruciform piers supporting vaults.
    Gothic
    Gothic contains a lot of stone structures with great expanses of glass, pointed arches using ribbed vaults, clustered columns, pointed spires and flying buttresses.
  • 6. Classical Example
    The Colosseum
    Built by/for:
    Vespasian
    Titus
    Constructed:
    1st Century AD
    Type of Building:
    Amphitheatre
    Structure:
    Travertine stone set without mortar, held together by 300 tons of iron clamps.
    The Colosseum itself was a many tiered oval structure, with seating for 50,000 people, and a wooden arena floor with two levels of passages, dressing rooms, cages, cells and storage spaces.
    In the Colosseum, you could see boxing matches, archery, chariot races and female fighters. There were also sea battles when the whole Colosseum was flooded by a nearby viaduct. The last event in the Colosseum was 523 A.D.
  • 7. Modern
    Modernism
    Postmodernism
    Modern architecture is usually categorized by:
    The idea that the materials and functional requirements determine the result
    The “machine aesthetic” or beauty of the machine
    An emphasis on vertical and horizontal lines
    Creating a decoration using the design of a building, or the refusal of decoration.
    Simplicity and eliminating unnecessary detail
    Form follows function
    Articulated shape
    Postmodern architecture is usually categorized by:
    The use of sculptural forms and ornaments
    Giving materials and objects human characteristics (Anthropomorphism)
    Meaning (This may include pluralism, double coding, flying buttresses and high ceilings, irony and paradox, and harmonizing with urban forms)
    Creating the illusion of space or depths where none actually exist (Trompe-l'œil)
    V
    Postmodernism
    Modernism
    “Modernist architects regard post-modern buildings as vulgar ... Postmodern architects often regard modern spaces as soulless and bland. The divergence in opinions comes down to a difference in goals: modernism is rooted in minimal and true use of material as well as absence of ornament, while postmodernism is a rejection of strict rules set by the early modernists and seeks exuberance in the use of building techniques, angles, and stylistic references.” Wikipedia.
  • 8. Modern Example
    Heiss House
    Architect:
    Peter Downes Designs
    Constructed:
    2002
    Home type:
    Single family dwelling
    Structure:
    Steel and timber
    This Australian house is just 20 minutes drive from Sydney’s CBD, built on a section of indigenous forest. The original design was rejected by the council because it involved cutting down a lot of the trees. Their second design involved zig-zagging the outline of the building between the trees, saving all but one tree. The result is truly stunning.
  • 9. Practical Architecture
    Requirements of Practicality
    Utility
    A building must do what it is required to do well.
    Economy
    A building must not cost lots to build and maintain. The building must also remain quality and value with time.
    Environment
    A building must be built with consideration to the renewability of materials, energy used, processing, shipping and installation.
    Reliability
    A building must be built to resist the forces that could damage or depreciate the structure.
    Comfort
    A building must have thought put into lighting, acoustics, sanitation, climate, healthy environments and must be easy to use.
  • 10. Practical Example
    The Skybox
    Architect:
    Melling:Morse Architects Ltd.
    Constructed:
    2001-2002
    Home Type:
    City house
    Structure:
    3-level timber box bolted to steel frame
    The Skybox is simply a narrow, 3 storey building sat atop a Wellington warehouse. It is of minimalist design, with a nice wooden interior. It has two bedrooms, an electric hoist to get furniture up and down and also has a “loggia” (a room with one side open to the elements).
  • 11. Sustainable Architecture
    Requirements of Sustainability
    What is Sustainable Architecture?
    Building Materials
    Recycled Materials
    Lower Volatile Organic Compounds
    Waste Management
    Composting
    Grey Water
    Water Management
    Rainwater Harvesting
    Grey Water
    Building Placement
    Mixed use zoning
    Energy Efficiency
    Heating and Cooling
    Ventilation
    Renewable energy
    Solar Panels
    Wind Turbines
    Solar Heating
    Sustainable Architecture usually describes using design techniques that are environmentally- friendly to design buildings.
  • 12. Sustainable Example
    Wind House
    Architect:
    WOHA
    Constructed:
    2004-2006
    Home Type:
    2-storey detached dwelling
    Structure:
    Reinforced concrete with steelwork, and pad footings
    The Wind House was designed especially to capture the winds of Singapore and deflect them through certain openings and windows in the house, via extended walls on either side of the house (see diagram). It has lovely views of the nearby Botanical Gardens, and also a sense of privacy and seclusion. This house is a lovely structure of steel, glass and concrete, and harmonizes with nature in many ways.
    Northeast wind
    House
    Southwest wind
  • 13. What I learnt about the topic
    Architecture
    (post-project)
  • What I learnt about researching
    Researching
  • 31. Bibliography
    Wikipedia –
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_architecture
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_architecture
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_architecture
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postmodern_architecture
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrialism
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sustainable_architecture
    Hellenistic Architecture - http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/architecture/hellenistic.htm
    Practical Architecture- http://www.alternative-architect.com/practical.htm
    HOME: New directions in world architecture and design (Published by: Millennium House Pty Ltd), 2006.