Making a Successful LMS Switch: A Case Study of DMA

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Making a Successful LMS Switch: A Case Study of DMA

  1. 1. Making A Successful LMS Switch – A Case Study of March 23, 2012 8:30am Tweet about this session! # LSC onLMS
  2. 2. Introduction of Panelists Amy Bassett, BA Marketing Director Digitec Interactive 407.299.1800 abassett@digitecinteractive.com www.knowledgedirectweb.com Jack McGrath, BA, MLS President and Creative Director Digitec Interactive 407.299.1800 jmcgrath@digitecinteractive.com www.knowledgedirectweb.com
  3. 3. Making A Successful LMS Switch How to: • Perform vendor selection and system evaluations • Switch LMSs with minimal vendor cost and user disruption • Avoid “settling for mediocrity” in online learning • “Convert” ILT or legacy content into effective eLearning experiences • Manage, launch, and deal with project scope • ANYTHING ELSE YOU’D LIKE TO COVER?
  4. 4. Why Switch? According to the 2010 eLearning Guild study, Getting Started with Learning Management Systems: • Only 62% of respondents said their LMS lives up to vendor promises • 13% plan to abandon their current LMS.
  5. 5. DMA’s Reasons for Switching Poor communication Wanted integrated course catalog & eCommerce Support issues went unresolved System was not multi-lingual 5 4 3 2 1 System did not support rich media content
  6. 6. Common Reasons Organizations Are Switching • Not user-friendly • Lacking key reporting functionality • Lacking technical support • Unable to scale up • Too costly (more affordable solutions now available) • Outdated (lacks desired features and functionality) Bersin & Associates survey (2009) The Elearning Guild – Evolution of the LMS (2009) Wainhouse Research (2012)
  7. 7. Question Other reasons to switch?
  8. 8. Develop a Requirements Doc • Decide which features you need in an LMS, with a use-case for the learner and the admin:  Critical  Needs  Wants • Questions to consider  Do you plan to sell courses?  Do you need built-in authoring tools?  Where and when will your learners access the platform? Step 1. Perform vendor selection
  9. 9. Identify Potential Systems • Send out, collect and review RFPs • See system demos • Narrow it down to 2-3 systems • Demo your current solution for new vendors • Ask for second demo (with IT staff)  Have vendors demonstrate that they can import existing student data  Invite representatives from third party systems to sit in to discuss any necessary integrations Step 1. Perform vendor selection
  10. 10. • Confirm that you and your vendor are on the same page  All system requirements should be in writing and approved by you and the vendor  Define any nomenclature Step 2. Minimal vendor cost and user disruption
  11. 11. • Hire an eLearning consultant to project manage the move • Ask all third party system providers to provide you with a cost break down for any necessary integration or support • Agree on a fixed cost with the new LMS vendor for all modifications, data import, support, etc. Tips for Reducing Cost Step 2. Minimal vendor cost and user disruption
  12. 12. Tips for Minimizing User Disruption • Coordinate with new vendor • Notify existing vendor that you need data exported • Test, test, test – development to production  Test at least 1% of the user accounts at random to ensure accuracy Step 2. Minimal vendor cost and user disruption
  13. 13. Tips for Minimizing User Disruption • Plan a scheduled outage  Give yourself more time than you think you’ll need  Be sure to avoid typically heavy usage times i.e. end of certification period, etc.  Opportunity to market the new LMS – keep them informed Step 2. Minimal vendor cost and user disruption
  14. 14. Tips for Improving Online Learning • Begin with a business case. Why do your learners need this course, and if you build it, will they come? • Start with solid learning objectives and outcomes • “SMEs are not IDs” – use technical experts as reviewers, rather than authors, unless you include an editorial pass by an instructional designer. Step 3. Avoid “Settling for Mediocrity”
  15. 15. Tips for leveraging existing content • Use the “one idea per screen” • Design interactivity and prescriptive learning • Avoid lengthy, passive “talking head” videos. Use controllers to allow user control. • Create engagement and relevance through messaging and discussion forums • Measure your results with assessments that truly reflect your content! Step 4. “Convert” ILT into effective eLearning
  16. 16. • Start with clear requirements that stakeholders agree to, based on actual needs analysis • Check references on potential vendors • Define a firm-fixed contract, with a set schedule • Decide what warrants a scope change or what can wait for future phases • Develop your content using instructional designers and SMEs and provide sufficient lead-time for course design well before launch. Step 5. Manage, launch, and project scope
  17. 17. Win a $25 Amazon Gift Card • Drop a business card into the jar  Write “I” on the back if you would like more Information  Write “W” on the back if you would like to receive a copy of our Whitepaper, 8 Steps to Selecting Your LMS  Write “NI” on the back if you are Not Interest but want to be included in the RAFFLE
  18. 18. Panelists Contact Information Amy Bassett, BA Marketing Director Digitec Interactive 407.299.1800 abassett@digitecinteractive.com www.knowledgedirectweb.com Jack McGrath, BA, MLS President and Creative Director Digitec Interactive 407.299.1800 jmcgrath@digitecinteractive.com www.knowledgedirectweb.com
  19. 19. Questions?

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