• Save
Presentatie marijke van hees 29 05-2013not
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Presentatie marijke van hees 29 05-2013not

on

  • 996 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
996
Views on SlideShare
996
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Presentatie marijke van hees 29 05-2013not Presentatie marijke van hees 29 05-2013not Document Transcript

  • The  Digital  City  Agenda  was  founded  in  2011.  The  idea  for  a  Digital  City  Agenda  arose  from  a  need  for  a  different  approach  to  the  economic  and  social  challenges  society  faces.  It  started  with  the  common  conclusion  of  several  governors  from  large  ci@es  that  the  innova@on  speed  is  much  to  low  in  respect  to  the  need  of  society  and  the  possibili@es  of  entrepreneurs.    Our  goal  as  smart  ci@es  is  to  find  innova@ve  solu@ons  for  the  complex  problems  that  our  society  deals  with  at  this  present  @me,  by  working  from  a  different,  new  perspec@ve  and  with  different,  new  resources:  especially  the  use  of  IT  and  broadband.  The  stakeholders  involved  know  that  implemen@ng  such  solu@ons  boHom  up  bares  the  risk  that  none  of  these  solu@ons  can  get  a  large  enough  and  sustainable  posi@on  on  the  market.  So  we  made  the  agreement  that  we  would  “scale  up”  and  implement  the  solu@ons  of  best  prac@ces  of  each  other.      1  
  • With  the  “Stedenlink”  founda@on  we  set  up  the  Digital  City  Agenda.  A  network  of  professional  en  poli@cal  people,  commiHed  to  the  societal  challenges  we  saw.  This  agenda  is  illustrated  by  ques@ons  as:  How  do  we  take  care  of  the  growing  group  of  elderly  people?  How  do  we  change  to  using  and  crea@ng  sustainable  energy?  How  do  we  keep  our  children  educated  and  safe?  All  these  ques@ons  exist  in  our  ci@es  and  villages.  The  commitment  grew  from  8  to  more  than  30  ac@ve  ci@es  within  2  years.  A  lot  of  businesses  and  knowledge  partners  work  together  on  this  implementa@on  agenda.  The  na@onal  government  supports  the  agenda  by  means  of  an  agreement  with  by  the  Ministry  of  Economic  Affairs;  worth  1  million  Euro.    Today’s  challenges  need  a  different  approach  than  our  tradi@onal  way  of  working.  Entrepreneurs,  Governments,  Educa@on,  Science,  Innovators,  and  Ci@zens:  we  all  need  to  join  forces  to  return  to  a  healthy,  strong  and  compe@@ve  Europe.  The  DSA  works  to  find  new  ways  of  working  by  approaching  issues  boHom  up:  what  does  society  want?  What  do  we  need?  As  these  things  change,  we  work  with  a  rolling  agenda  that  is  adjusted  to  the  needs  of  that  specific  @me.  DSA  is  a  networking  organiza@on:  we  bring  all  stakeholders  throughout  the  chain  of  change  together,  and  facilitate  collabora@on.  We  work  in  co-­‐crea@on,  which  means  all  par@cipa@ng  par@es  feel  ownership  of  the  problem  and  will  be  part  owner  of  the  solu@on.      2  
  • DSA  intents  to  break  through  old  paradigms.  We  focus  on  ini@a@ve  and  ac@on,  in  order  to  come  to  concrete  and  working  solu@ons.  To  do  this,  people,  ideas,  solu@ons,  knowledge  and  resources  need  to  be  brought  together  and  made  available  in  a  transparent  manner.  This  way  we  can  learn  from  each  other.  Through  co-­‐crea@on,  experiments  and  collec@ve  investments  we  can  make  op@mal  use  of  scarce  resources.  DSA  wants  to  find  innova@ve  solu@ons  for  the  large  social  issues  of  this  @me.  IT  naturally  plays  a  large  role  in  these  solu@ons,  but  IT  by  itself  is  not  the  answer.  To  come  to  solu@ons  for  the  complex  issues  that  our  country  (and  all  of  Europe)  is  dealing  with,  we  need  a  different  approach  to  local  issues.  In  spite  of  this  new  approach,  we  do  have  to  focus  on  standardiza@on  and  interoperability  of  the  solu@ons  that  we  find.  Open  networks  and  open  data  are  the  slogans  of  this  way  of  working.  Sharing  and  giving  are  the  values  in  this  community.      3  
  • To  be  able  to  facilitate  local  change,  local  municipali@es  need  to  break  through  tradi@on  and  paradigms.  We  cannot  seHle  for  the  ‘basics’  anymore.  We  have  to  start  interac@ng  more  with  our  surroundings.  We  recognize  that  changes  in  our  way  of  governing  need  to  be  made:  our  Dutch  social  care  system  resists  innova@on.    Because  of  the  budget  cuts  of  the  na@onal  government,  ci@es  try  to  cut  down  the  costs  of  their  services  to  the  public.  To  work  more  efficiently  they  have  to  scale  up  the  size  of  their  organiza@on  by  serving  a  larger  number  of  people.  There  is  a  heavy  debate  going  on  about  the  usefulness  of  this  scale-­‐enlargement.    But,  ladies  and  gentleman,  to  meet  the  needs  of  the  local  community,  our  municipali@es  also  know  that  they  need  to  work  more  socially.  Listening  to  society  and  being  involved  with  the  needs  of  society  will  lead  to  a  more  effec@ve  way  of  managing  the  urban  challenges.  Smart  ci@es  strive  to  combine  these  two  aspects  in  an  innova@ve  program  approach.  They  need  to  re-­‐invent  their  role  and  themselves.  By  arranging  and  facilita@ng  the  community  problem  solving  capacity,  municipali@es  can  steer  to  a  vision  based  deployment  of  community  service  with  al  lot  of  stakeholders  involved.  IT  will  help  us  in  this  respect  to  do  more  with  less  and  reach  common  goals.  This  orienta@on  of  the  administra@on  and  bureaucracy  in  innova@ve  smart  ci@es  is  the  context  of  the  Digital  Ci@es  Agenda.  The  issue  of  the  use  of  IT  in  community  service  is  also  embedded  in  this  context.  Because  of  this  complex  context,  it  is  not  easy  to  bring  innova@ve  IT  solu@ons  into  prac@se.  Ci@es  based  their  involvements  as  smart  ci@es  on  their  strong  points  in  society  and  in  the  business    4  
  • The  European  Commission  formulated  seven  Flagship  programs  to  reinforce  the  European  economy  in  a  sustainable  manner.  All  DSA  programs  are  somehow  connected  to  these  flagships,  but  four  of  the  flagships  are  largely  aHended  to  within  the  DSA  programs.    The  topics  of  the  European  digital  agenda  are  strongly  connected  to  the  Dutch  Digital  City  Agenda.  The  ‘innova@on  union’  reflects  the  DSA  goals;  find  innova@ve  solu@ons  by  bringing  all  involved  par@es  together,  and  work  in  co-­‐crea@on.  For  example  on  the  introduc@on  of  e-­‐health,  recently  promoted  by  the  European  Commission.    The  flagship  ‘new  skills  and  jobs’  are  to  be  found  in  the  Learning  city,  where  we  work  on  human  capital  through  digital  skills  and  the  digital  transi@on  in  our  educa@onal  system.  But  also  the  programs  City  of  Entrepreneurs  and  Deregulated  City  work  alongside  this  flagship,  as  they  facilitate  and  s@mulate  entrepreneurship.  Resource  efficiency  is  an  important  theme  all  through  the  world.  All  of  us  realize  we  should  have  started  yesterday:  the  sense  of  urgency  is  high.  The  DSA  aHributes  to  this  issue  within  the  program  Green  City.    5  
  • DSA  works  in  eight  different  programs  each  based  on  a  central  issue.    Each  program  is  directed  by  one  coordina@ng  city  and  supported  by  other  ci@es,  businesses  and  knowledge  ins@tutes  across  the  country.  DSA  works  locally:  the  place  where  change  begins.  We  recognize  that  we  cannot  enforce  change  top  down  anymore,  we  need  to  facilitate  change  boHom  up.  Ci@zens,  ci@es  and  businesses  come  up  with  small,  some@mes  brilliant  ini@a@ves.  DSA  offers  a  chance  for  pilots  and  try  outs  on  small  scale  and,  if  successful,  upscale  aeerwards.  In  this  respect  we  speed  up  implementa@on  by  suppor@ng  the  markets  to  deploy  solu@ons.  This  way,  a  small  but  brilliant  idea  can  change  into  a  worldwide  innova@on!        6  
  • The  eight  coordina@ng  ci@es  of  the  DSA  have  set  themselves  the  goal  to  accelerate  change  within  the  theme  of  their  choice.  For  the  city  of  Amersfoort,  that  theme  is  sustainability.  Our  way  of  genera@ng  energy  is  going  through  a  transi@on  to  become  more  sustainable  and  fit  for  the  future.  This  transi@on  might  seem  very  technical:  from  central  to  decentralized  genera@on,  from  fossil  fuels  to  sun-­‐,  water-­‐  or  wind  energy.  Even  though  these  are  very  technical  processes,  I  am  convinced  that  this  technical  transi@on  goes  hand  in  hand  with  a  social  transi@on:  at  the  end  of  this  social  transi@on,  a  consumer  can  be  user  and  producer  at  the  same  @me  and  be  a  prosumer.  IT  gives  us  the  instruments  that  can  make  this  happen  at  a  large  scale.  One  of  the  projects  within  the  Green  City  is  “Smart  Grid:  rendement  voor  iedereen”  (profit  for  all).  In  this  project  many  different  actors  work  together  to  develop  new  Smart  Grid  service  concepts.  The  project  evolves  around  200  households  that  have  been  co  crea@ng  with  municipali@es,  provinces  and  businesses  from  the  beginning.  They  help  developing  and  tes@ng  new  techniques  like  installing  solar  panels  and  home  energy  management  systems,  but  most  importantly  give  feedback  and  communicate  openly  with  all  other  par@es.  This  communica@on  goes  via  ‘district  TV’  and  an  open  source  plaiorm.  This  way  knowledge  and  experience  is  retrieved  while  working  on  the  project.  By  that  the  business  cases  that  arise  meet  the  needs  of  all  stakeholders:  profit  for  all!    7  
  •  Innova@ons  and  IT  usage  in  (long-­‐term)  care  therefore  are  essen@al  for  high  quality  and  accessible  care.  Caring  City,  one  of  the  themes  within  the  Dutch  Digital  City  Agenda  is  working  with  innova@ve  solu@ons  that  keep  our  society  moving.    As  a  result  of  the  individualiza@on  of  our  socie@es  we  no  longer  know  exactly  who  lives  in  our  street  or  in  our  neighbourhood.  And  many  volunteer  organiza@ons  will  tell  you  that  it  is  difficult  to  find  people  who  are  willing  to  volunteer  on  a  regular  basis.  Does  that  mean  that  people  are  no  longer  interested  in  helping  each  other?  No,  not  at  all.  But  people  seek  short  term  commitments,  with  clear  end  dates  and  the  possibility  to  assist  only  when  it  suits  them.  New  ini@a@ves  as  the  Dutch  online  organiza@ons  WeHelpen.nl  (WeHelp)  and  ZorgVoorElkaar.nl  (Care  For  Each  Other)  provide  plaiorms  to  unleash  this  enormous  poten@al  of  informal  care.  Based  on  postal  codes  people  can  ask  for  assistance  and  care,  or  let  each  other  know  that  they  can  be  asked  for  help.  It  could  be  learning  Dutch,  picking  up  medicines,  garden  work,  a  walk  to  the  park  or  a  visit  to  the  museum.  Simple  things.  These  services  help  to  @e  the  social  networks  in  our  neighbourhoods  together  and  create  more  vital  communi@es.  And  they  help  in  cumng  down  the  cost  for  healthcare  and  welfare.  Also,  they  could  be  great  to  support  the  3  million  caretakers  in  the  Netherlands,  who  next  to  their  already  busy  lives  take  care  of  an  ill  child,  spouse  or  elderly  parent.      Many  Dutch  ci@es  are  experimen@ng  with  these  online  par@cipatory  health  services.  S@ll,  these  services  are  rela@vely  unknown  and  require  a  much  broader  audience  to    8  
  •  Making  civilians  correct  their  own  property  value  (WOZ-­‐waarde)?  Would  that  be  possible?  End  2011  and  end  2012,  the  municipali@es  Tilburg  and  Borne  have  been  gradually  experimen@ng  with  this  in  pilots.  An  assured  breakthrough  project!    The  ci@es  launched  a  web-­‐service  that  provides  ci@zens  transparent  informa@on  about  the  value  of  their  property  (‘WOZ  waarde’)  that  is  linked  to  their  tax-­‐assessment.  The  ‘WOZ  waarde’  is  always  a  topic  for  much  dispute  between  house  owning  civilians  and  the  municipality,  leading  to  many  complaints  and  high  administra@ve  costs.  Especially  now,  because  of  the  decline  of  the  value  of  property  of  houses.    The  goal  of  the  WOZ  project  is  to  increase  transparency  and  establish  an  understanding  of  the  property  value  for  stakeholders.  Besides  transparent  informa@on,  people  can  compare  and  even  correct  the  informa@on.  Missing  or  incorrect  informa@on  can  be  corrected,  directly  showing  the  effects  of  the  correc@on  on  the  new  “temporary”  property  value  (WOZ  waarde).  This  last  aspect;  Ci@zens  correc@ng  the  informa@on  themselves  is  unique,  this  is  the  breakthrough!    This  project  also  provides  great  poten@al  for  the  city.  The  web  service  results  in  a  drop  in  official  complaints  and  thus  a  drop  in  process  costs,  ci@zens  are  contribu@ng  to  the  quality  of  municipal  data,  and  the  transparent  character  of  such  projects  strengthens  the  bond  between  the  municipality  and  its  ci@zens.      The  project  has  proven  to  be  very  successful,  and  has  gained  much  praise  by  its    9  
  • A  lot  of  the  issues  Europe  men@ons  in  its  flagship  programs  manifest  themselves  locally,  so  local  solu@ons  will  contribute  largely  to  the  flagship  goals.  The  Europe  2020  strategy  contains  an  urgent  request  to  al  governmental  ins@tu@ons,  but  also  businesses,  knowledge  ins@tutes  and  ci@zens  to  focus  on  the  European  challenges  as  much  as  our  own  capacity  allows  us  to.  By  adjus@ng  our  efforts  to  each  other  and  to  our  European  ambi@ons,  we  can  make  a  shie  to  what  we  all  want:  a  socially  and  economically  strong,  self-­‐organizing  society.  And  it  does  not  have  to  take  us  very  long  to  get  there!  10  
  • Ladies  and  gentleman,  I  have  come  to  the  end  of  my  contribu@on  to  this  event.  As  we  all  know  and  have  seen,  top  down  changing  our  systems  and  society  no  longer  works.  I  don’t  think  it  ever  did!  Now,  we  are  seeking  new  ways  to  innovate.  The  technology  to  support  this  is  already  there,  but  not  fully  deployed.  It  is  unchartered  territory,  we  are  all  learning  by  trial  and  error.  Let’s  find  out  what  ci@zens  and  customers  need,  let’s  try  to  create  value  by  working  together  with  stakeholders.  The  Digital  City  Agenda  facilitates  this  change  movement;  helps  bring  par@es  together  and  create  new  ways  to  organize  the  collabora@on.    Change  will  always  be  scary;  it  will  never  be  easy.  There  is  no  straight  line  from  the  beginning  to  the  end.  But  I  hope  I  have  shown  you  the  good  things  that  come  from  change  today,  and  I  hope  I  have  inspired  you  to  hop  on  our  train  of  social  collabora@on  and  create  movement  in  your  own  environment.  Let’s  do  it:  make  our  ci@es  smart  and  strenghten  the  economy  and  our  society!      11