Coming to America (Edinburgh workshop)

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Coming to America (Edinburgh workshop)

  1. 1. Coming to America 2014 Monday, 10th February 2014 SDI Apex House, Edinburgh
  2. 2. Coming to America 2014 Carl Gardiner SDI Welcome
  3. 3. Coming to America 2014 Time Item Speaker / Presenter 12:40 – 12:55 Select USA Highlighting the US government’s initiatives, investment programmes and services John Breidenstine, US Embassy 12:55 – 13:25 Immigration All you need to know about immigration to the US Paul Samartin, Laura Devine Solicitors 13:25 – 14:10 Cultural differences from a marketing perspective Business case; underlying values; How to market to Americans; assessing the impact of culture; top tips for brand localization Allyson Stewart-Allen, International Marketing Partners 14:10 End of group sessions End of workshop for morning 1:1 sessions attendees Break for attendees of the afternoon 1:1 sessions
  4. 4. Coming to America 2014 SelectUSA By John Breidenstine, US Embassy, London
  5. 5. America is open for business! Coming to America Series 2014 February 10-12, 2014 Edinburgh and Glasgow, Scotland John D. Breidenstine Minister Counselor for Commercial Affairs, U.S. Embassy London SelectUSA | U.S. Department of Commerce © International Trade Administration 2013 SelectUSA.gov
  6. 6. U.S. Open Investment Policy “The United States reaffirms our open investment policy, a commitment to treat all investors in a fair and equitable manner under the law.” - Statement by the President Obama, June 20, 2011 Policy upheld by administrations throughout U.S. history Core obligation in bilateral investment treaties (BITs) Investors and investments ensured to receive treatment no less favorable than the U.S. affords to its own investors and investments © International Trade Administration 2013 www.SelectUSA.gov
  7. 7. Global FDI Trends #1 AT Kearney’s 2013 FDI Confidence Index China: #2 Germany: #7 UK: #8 Ranking: FDI Confidence Index 1 China 3 Brazil 4 Canada 5 India Australia 7 Germany World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business 2012 Ranking 8 United Kingdom 9 Mexico Singapore: #1 #4 2 6 #1 United States 10 Singapore IESE Business School’s 2011 Venture Capital and Private Equity Index Canada: #2 UK: #3 Germany: #7 Hong Kong SAR: #2 New Zealand: #3 Source: AT Kearney #7 World Economic Forum’s 2012-2013 Global Competitiveness rankings UK: #8 France: #21 © International Trade Administration 2012 Germany: #6 SelectUSA.gov
  8. 8. Global FDI Trends $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $3.9 Trillion In USD Millions $4,000,000 The United States remains the largest recipient of FDI in the world. $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 20 largest country recipients by FDI stock in 2012; Currency displayed at current market value. Source: UN Conference on Trade and Development
  9. 9. U.S. FDI Trends Top 15 FDI Stock Positions, 2012 10% | $261.1b 21% | $564.7b 10% | $272.3b 8% | $221.7b 2% | 41.4b 1% | 30.8b 1% | $29.2b Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Largest Country Sources of FDI in the United States by 2012 Stock Position % of Total Stock Market ($2.7 trillion) Million USD 564,714 United Kingdom 21.30% 309,383 Japan 11.67% 272,262 Germany 10.27% 261,133 Canada 9.85% 221,724 France 8.36% 130,075 Netherlands 4.91% 127,674 Ireland 4.82% 126,007 Switzerland 4.75% 51,894 Spain 1.96% 51,051 Australia 1.93% 47,728 Belgium 1.8% 41,449 Sweden 1.56% 33,194 Italy 1.25% 30,814 Norway 1.16% 29,175 Mexico 1.10% 5% | $130.1b 5% | $127.7b 5% | $126b 2% | $47.7b 2% | $51.9b 1%| $33.2b 12% | $309.4b 2%|$51.1b Source: Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis – FDI Position by Ultimate Beneficiary Owner © International Trade Administration 2013
  10. 10. U.S. FDI Trends Top 15 FDI Growth Markets, 2012 31.2% | $30.8b 15.5% | $41.4b 15% | $10.7b 25.8% | $127.7b 63.5% | $193m 14.7% | $126b 15.8% | $1.8b 20.8% | $234m 15.5% | $4.9b Fastest Growing Sources of FDI in the United States, by Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) 2008-2012 2012 Stock Rank Market CAGR million USD 1 China 70.82% 10,465 2 Hungary 63.51% 193 3 Indonesia 38.05% 425 4 Norway 31.20% 30,814 5 Malaysia 26.37% 1,711 6 Ireland 25.75% 127,674 7 Uruguay 20.77% 234 8 India 17.80% 8,995 9 Colombia 15.82% 1,837 10 Sweden 15.51% 41,449 11 Venezuela 15.48% 4,934 12 Denmark 15.06% 10,709 13 Kuwait 14.96% 2,393 14 Korea 14.86% 24,270 15 Switzerland 14.69% 126,007 14.9% | $24.3b 70.8% | $10.5b 15% | $2.4b 17.8%| $9b 38.1%| $425m 26.4%| $1.7b Note: Figures denote 5 year compound annual growth rate (2008-2012) of the stock FDI position and the total stock of FDI in the United States Source: Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis – FDI by Ultimate Beneficiary Owner © International Trade Administration 2013
  11. 11. U.S. FDI Trends - Europe The Stock of FDI from Europe to the United States was $1.7 trillion in 2012 600,000 US$ Millions 500,000 400,000 300,000 Manufacturing Wholesale trade Retail trade Information Depository institutions Finance (except depository institutions) and insurance Real estate and rental and leasing Professional, scientific, and technical services Other industries Non-disclosed 200,000 100,000 0 Source: Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis © International Trade Administration 2013
  12. 12. SelectUSA Summit 2013 “There is no better place in the world to do business than the United States of America.” - President Barack Obama © International Trade Administration 2014 SelectUSA.gov
  13. 13. FDI Benefits the U.S. Economy #1 20.5% of U.S. Exports ~6 million U.S. jobs The United States is the largest recipient of foreign direct investment in the world. In 2011, U.S. subsidiaries of foreign-owned firms accounted for 20.5 percent of all U.S. goods exports. In 2011, subsidiaries employed 5.6 million U.S. workers. Average annual wage $77,600 In 2011, subsidiaries contributed $437.8 billion in wages to U.S. employees R&D Investments In 2011, subsidiaries invested $45.2 billion in research and development in the United States Investments in Fixed Assets In 2011, subsidiaries owned $1.6 trillion in gross property, plant, and equipment (PP&E). They invested more than $177 billion in PP&E improvements in one year, alone. Sources: Bureau of Economic Analysis; UN Conference on Trade & Development © International Trade Administration 2012
  14. 14. About SelectUSA Housed in the U.S. Department of Commerce, SelectUSA’s mission is to promote and facilitate business investment in the United States. It is housed in the U.S. Department of Commerce and represented by the Commercial Service at U.S. Embassies and Consulates around the World. SelectUSA is geographically neutral and represents the entire United States. It uphold the U.S. open investment policy and performs uniquely federal functions. Our Clients: Companies (investors) U.S. States and Regions SelectUSA Report: Foreign Direct Investment in the United States: Released on December 31, the report studies FDI in the United States by geography, industry, and economic impact. http://selectusa.commerce.gov/fdi-report © International Trade Administration 2014 SelectUSA.gov
  15. 15. About SelectUSA • Mission: Facilitate business investment in the United States in order to support job creation, spur economic growth, and promote American competitiveness. • Established through executive order in 2011. Primary U.S. governmentwide initiative to promote and facilitate business investment in the United States • Housed in the International Trade Administration at the U.S. Department of Commerce - leverages staff in 72 markets around the world • Geographically neutral in the United States • Clients: Firms and U.S. Economic Development Organizations (EDOs) 15
  16. 16. SelectUSA Services for Firms: Information & Counseling SelectUSA provides actionable information and counseling to investors to help them… • • • • • • Incorporate a business in the U.S. Understand basic U.S. tax and legal concepts Navigate federal rules or regulations Learn about incentives available to businesses in the U.S. Apply for a business-related visa Connect with U.S. state, city, or regional economic development offices to learn about investment opportunities 16
  17. 17. SelectUSA Services for Firms: Ombudsman Assistance SelectUSA works across the federal government on a case-by-case basis to: • Address foreign investor concerns and issues • Connect with a federal agency/ office to seek insight into a specific case • Offer to facilitate direct communication between the relevant federal agency and the client, as appropriate • Identify federal regulations or processes to U.S. policy makers, that may negatively impact the U.S. business climate Investor inquiries with SelectUSA are treated as businessconfidential, and the Ombudsman function is conducted by SelectUSA headquarters. 17
  18. 18. SelectUSA Services for U.S. States and Regions: Advocacy Assistance SelectUSA can, when appropriate, promote the U.S. business climate to a potential investor in an ongoing project that: • May be at risk, • May face international competition, and • When a federal-level engagement can convey the appropriate support Senior leadership in USG, DOC, or ITA will be asked to engage to help advocate for the investment being made in the United States. SelectUSA coordinates with the FCS post. Advocacy Assistance may only be requested by U.S. Economic Development Organizations. The United States will advocate to the firm on behalf of the entire nation. Advocacy requests are treated as business-confidential, and the Advocacy function is conducted by SelectUSA headquarters. 18
  19. 19. FOR STARTUPS © International Trade Administration 2012 SelectUSA.gov
  20. 20. Thank You! John D. Breidenstine Minister Counselor for Commercial Affairs U.S. Commercial Service U.S. Embassy London Tel: +44-20-7894-0419 Email: john.breidenstine@trade.gov .gov © International Trade Administration 2012 SelectUSA.gov
  21. 21. FDI in the United States by Industry, 2012 FDI Position in Manufacturing, 2012: 898.9 billion USD FDI Position in Other Industries, 2012: 562.8 billion USD FDI Position in Services, 2012: 721.1 billion USD 1% Food 4% 4% 5% 32% 7% 10% 12% 15% Electrical equipment, appliances, and components Primary and fabricated metals 27% 7% Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting Mining 14% Depository institutions (banking) 24% Utilities Finance (except depository institutions) and insurance Computers and electronic products Machinery Real estate and rental and leasing Construction 11% 41% Transportation equipment Professional, scientific, and technical services 51% Chemicals 7% 2% 26% Transportation and warehousing Holding companies (nonbank) Other services Other manufacturing FDI Position in Information, 2012: 123.8 billion USD FDI Position in Wholesale Trade, 2012: 292.4 billion USD 0% Motor vehicles and motor vehicle parts and supplies Electrical goods 13% 43% 14% Petroleum and petroleum products Other 3% Data processing, hosting, and related services Broadcasting (except internet) 6% 18% 50% 1% FDI Position in Retail Trade, 2012: 51.7 Billion USD 13% Motion picture and sound recording industries Newspaper, periodical, book, and database publishers Software publishers 0% Food and beverage stores 5% 4% 45% Other retail trade 12% Health and personal care stores Other Information 18% 22% 24% Telecommunications Clothing and clothing accessories stores Miscellaneous store retailers 9% Furniture and home furnishings stores Nonstore retailers Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis © International Trade Administration 2012 3
  22. 22. FDI Growth in the United States by Industry FDI Growth in the United States by Major Industry Sectors (Compound annual growth rate in FDI position between 2008 and 2012 on a historical cost basis) Manufacturing: Petroleum refining & extraction Manufacturing: Petroleum and coal products Depository institutions (banking) Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services Manufacturing: Chemicals Retail Trade Finance and Insurance Manufacturing: All Manufacturing: Transportation Equipment Manufacturing: Food Manufacturing: All Machinery Manufacturing: Fabricated Metal Products Primary and fabricated metals Manufacturing: Computers and Electronic Products Wholesale trade ** Information -10% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% ** “Information” includes “publishing industries, including newspaper, periodical, book, and database publishers.” FDI in publishing industries experienced -11.6 percent CAGR during 2008-12. Source: Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis © International Trade Administration 2013 60%
  23. 23. FDI Growth by Industry: Manufacturing FDI in the United States Continues to Grow CAGR: Manufacturing FDI in the United States, 2008-12 Other manufacturing: Integrated petroleum refining and extraction Other manufacturing: Petroleum and coal products Basic chemicals Ventilation, heating, air-conditioning, and commercial refrigeration equipment Asphalt and other petroleum and coal products Bakeries and tortillas Electrical equipment, appliances, and components Grain and oilseed milling Glass and glass products Semiconductors and other electronic components Navigational, measuring, and other instruments Meat products Other chemical products and preparations Soap, cleaning compounds, and toilet preparations Seafood product preparation and packaging Pesticides, fertilizers, and other agricultural chemicals Printing and related support activities Apparel Converted paper products Other machinery Chemicals Other manufacturing 0% 10% 20% Source: Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis © International Trade Administration 2013 30% 40% 50% 60%
  24. 24. FDI Growth by Industry: Solid Growth in Banking, Finance, Professional, Technical Services CAGR: Finance & Insurance FDI in the United States, 2008-12 Activities related to credit intermediation Banks Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles Securities and commodity contracts intermediation and brokerage Life insurance carriers Insurance carriers and related activities Securities, commodity contracts, and other intermediation and related… Insurance carriers, except life insurance carriers Finance, except depository institutions Nondepository credit intermediation and related services Nondepository credit intermediation Other financial investment activities and exchanges Agencies, brokerages, and other insurance related activities CAGR: Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services FDI in the United States, 2008-12 Specialized design services Computer systems design and related services Accounting, tax preparation, bookkeeping, and payroll services Advertising and related services Legal services Other Architectural, engineering, and related services Other professional, scientific, and technical services Management, scientific, and technical consulting Scientific research and development services -10% © International Trade Administration 2013 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Source: Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis 50% 60% 70% 80%
  25. 25. FDI Growth by Industry: Mixed Growth in Wholesale Trade, Retail Trade and Information CAGR: Wholesale Trade FDI in the United States, 2008-12 Farm product raw materials Chemical and allied products Groceries and related products Paper and paper products Professional and commercial equipment and supplies Motor vehicles and motor vehicle parts and supplies Hardware, and plumbing and heating equipment and supplies Other Miscellaneous nondurable goods Other durable goods Drugs and druggists' sundries Machinery, equipment, and supplies Miscellaneous durable goods Metals and minerals (except petroleum) Electrical goods Lumber and other construction materials Furniture and home furnishings Apparel, piece goods, and notions Petroleum and petroleum products CAGR: Information FDI in the United States, 2008-12 Other information services Motion picture and sound recording industries Other telecommunications Telecommunications Software publishers Newspaper, periodical, book, and database publishers Publishing industries CAGR: Retail Trade FDI in the United States, 2008-12 Clothing and clothing accessories stores Nonstore retailers Other Food and beverage stores Health and personal care stores Motor vehicle and parts dealers Furniture and home furnishings stores Electronics and appliance stores -40% -20% © International Trade Administration 2013 0% 20% 40% Source: Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis 60%
  26. 26. Coming to America 2014 Immigration By Paul Samartin, Laura Devine Solicitors
  27. 27. Coming to America US immigration overview February 2014 Paul Samartin Jennifer Snead Laura Devine Solicitors www.lauradevine.com enquiries@lauradevine.com +44 (0) 20 7469 6460 IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  28. 28. US immigration • Nonimmigrants • Immigrants • US citizens IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  29. 29. Nonimmigrants • Visa Waiver Program (VWP) Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. • ESTA https://esta.cbp.dhs.gov/esta/esta.html • B-1/B-2 visa IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  30. 30. Permissible activities on VWP or B-1 visa “Legitimate activities relating to business” • Engaging in commercial transactions, which do not involve gainful employment in the US (e.g. merchant who takes orders for goods manufactured abroad) • Investing in businesses or setting up new businesses • Negotiating contracts • Consulting with business associates • Litigating • Participating in scientific, educational, professional, or business conventions, conferences, or seminars • Undertaking independent research IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  31. 31. Nonimmigrants H-1B speciality occupations • degree or related experience • degree level position • labor condition application • annual cap IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  32. 32. Nonimmigrants B-1 in lieu of H-1 overseas professional workers • foreign employer • paid, managed and directed abroad • customarily employed • related degree IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  33. 33. Nonimmigrants E-3 Australian speciality workers • degree or equivalent experience • degree level position • labor condition application • annual cap IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  34. 34. Nonimmigrants TN NAFTA professionals • Canadians and Mexicans only • 63 enumerated professions • temporary employment • management consultants IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  35. 35. Nonimmigrants L-1 intracompany transfers • 12 months’ experience in related company outside US • 1 year for new offices, 3 years for offices doing business for more than 1 year • managers, executives and employees with specialised knowledge IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  36. 36. Nonimmigrants L-1 intracompany transfers to new US offices • evidence of sufficient premises for the new office • business plan • evidence of the size of the US investment and financial ability to remunerate the employee / commence business • issues related to renewal of L-1 new office status after the initial year IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  37. 37. Nonimmigrants E-1/E-2 treaty traders and investors • treaty nationality • trade vs investment • supervisors, executives and employees with special qualifications IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  38. 38. Nonimmigrants F-1 students J-1 exchange visitors • • • • Interns and trainees J-1 sponsors training program 2 year home residency requirement IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  39. 39. Nonimmigrants O-1 aliens with extraordinary ability • extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business or athletics OR extraordinary achievement in the motion picture or television industry • sustained national or international acclaim • extensive documentation and evidence required • work in US in the field of extraordinary ability IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  40. 40. Immigrants • Employment-Based • Family-Based IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  41. 41. Immigrants Employment-Based Immigrants • Priority date • Employment-Based Preferences • • • • • First Preference Second Preference Third Preference Fourth Preference Fifth Preference • Procedures IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  42. 42. Immigrants Employment-Based Immigration: First Preference (EB-1) • Extraordinary Ability • Outstanding professors and researchers • Multinational manager or executive IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  43. 43. Immigrants Employment-Based Immigration: Second Preference (EB-2) • Advanced Degree • Exceptional Ability • National Interest Waiver IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  44. 44. Immigrants Employment-Based Immigration: Third Preference (EB-3) • Skilled workers • Professionals • Unskilled workers IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  45. 45. Immigrants Employment-Based Fourth Preference (EB-4) • Special Immigrants • • • • • • • • • • Religious Workers Broadcasters Iraqi/Afghan Translators Iraqis Who Have Assisted the United States International Organization Employees Physicians Armed Forces Members Panama Canal Zone Employees Retired NATO-6 employees Spouses and Children of Deceased NATO-6 employees IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  46. 46. Immigrants Employment-Based Fifth Preference (EB-5) • Investors • Must invest $1,000,000 or $500,000 in a new commercial enterprise • Must create or preserve at least 10 full-time jobs for qualifying US workers within two years of admission to US IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  47. 47. Immigrants Diversity Visa Lottery • Up to 55,000 diversity visas available annually • Drawn from individuals who are from countries with low rates of immigration to the US (UK is usually not eligible, except NI) • Must have at least: • A high school education or its equivalent; or • Two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years' training or experience. IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  48. 48. Immigrants Family-Based Immigrants • Visa Limits and Priority Dates • Immediate relatives: Spouses and children of US citizens, and parents of adult US citizens. • Family-Based Preferences • First Preference: Unmarried Sons and Daughters (21 years of age or older) of US Citizens. (23,400 plus some unused.) • Second Preference: Spouses and Children, and Unmarried Sons and daughters of Permanent Residents. (114,200, plus some unused.) • (A) Spouses and Children of Permanent Residents (77% of the overall second preference limitation) • (B) Unmarried Sons and Daughters of Permanent Residents. (23% of the overall second preference limitation.) • Third Preference: Married Sons and Daughters of US Citizens. (23,400, plus some unused.) • Fourth Preference: Brothers and Sisters of Adult US Citizens. (65,000, plus some unused.) • Procedures IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  49. 49. US citizens • By birth • Born in the US / outside the US • By naturalization • Loss of citizenship (renunciation / relinquishment) IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  50. 50. • THANK YOU IMMIGRATION SOLUTIONS UK USA © LDS2013 All rights reserved Regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (no. 00383835)
  51. 51. Coming to America 2014 Cultural Differences from a Marketing Perspective By Allyson Stewart-Allen, International Marketing Partners
  52. 52. Marketing to Americans Scottish Development International February 2014 Allyson Stewart-Allen StewartDirector International Marketing Partners Ltd. 148148-150 Buckingham Palace Road London SW1W 9TR Tel: +44 (0)20 7828 9400 E: allyson@intermarketingonline.com Twitter: @MuseofMarketing © International Marketing Partners Ltd. 52
  53. 53. Why Have You Invited Me Today? Advise leaders and organisations to successfully span boundaries Develop global mindsets to avoid diplomacy faux pas BrandTravel™ expert on localisation Advisor to leadership teams on building global mindsets Author of Working with Americans (Pearson), Marketing in the USA (UKTI) International experience (“local knowledge) - Los Angeles, London, French and German languages 53
  54. 54. The Business Case “The customer rarely buys what the business thinks it sells him” - Peter Drucker
  55. 55. Underlying values: USA Clock is King You look wonderful! What’s the bottom line Business before pleasure Hip, hip, hooray for our team! 55
  56. 56. Underlying Values Discuss with your table team… 2-3 implications of these values on how you effectively engage American customers/clients Take 5 minutes 56
  57. 57. Underlying values: USA Do it now! Let’s do lunch Make it my way Plan, plan, plan Guides are good 57
  58. 58. Underlying Values Now you have had the next 5 values, again identify with your table team… 2-3 implications of these values on how you effectively engage American customers/clients Take 5 minutes Select a speaker for your table 58
  59. 59. How to Market to Americans Low context communications – Evolved in response to melting pot • Political correctness WYSIWYG – – speed Take care with irony, double entendres Humor as bonding, relaxing tool Anchor us in the future 59
  60. 60. How to Market to Americans Entertain us, teach us something – Trivia, facts, something you’d not expect then to know RATER – Responsive, Assurance, Tangibles, Empathy, Reliability Close the sale – 60 Call to action, be quant, get to the point
  61. 61. How to Market to Americans Reply to calls, e-mails quickly e– 48 hours maximum Tell us your plan – Explain it, bring us with you (“T” in RATER) References – Brands/names they will know Spin – Break good news as publicly as possible • – 61 High positive feedback culture Control the message
  62. 62. Assessing the Impact of Culture 62
  63. 63. Assessing the Impact of Culture
  64. 64. Troublesome Words…UK US bespoke bolshy cackcack-handed cockcock-up damp squib dog’s bollocks dog’s body dog’s breakfast dog’s dinner dosh duff dross fortnight “goes down a bomb” hole in the wall knackered naff nil nought nous palaver pearpear-shaped quite quid sticky wicket scheme teach grandmother to suck eggs tosh turnover table 64
  65. 65. Translation Guide… What the British Say… What the British mean… What the Americans understand… Oh, by the way/Incidentally The primary purpose of our discussion is… This is not very important I’ll bear it in mind I will do nothing about it They will probably do it I’m sure it’s my fault It is your fault It was their fault I almost agree I don’t agree at all S/he’s not far from agreement Could we consider some other options? I don’t like your idea They have not yet decided I hear what you say I disagree and do not want to discuss it any further S/he accepts my point of view 65
  66. 66. Troublesome Words… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_British _words_not_widely_used_in_the_United _States 66
  67. 67. Top tips for your brand localisation Immerse yourself Understand values Observe Difference = difference Know your own position, biases Re-purpose/adapt to the culture 67
  68. 68. Want to know more? Check your global mindset – – Website quiz: Working with the World Website quiz: Working with Americans Marketing in the USA (UKTI) – Free download from us and UKTI: www.intermarketingonline.com Contact me: allyson@intermarketingonline.com 68
  69. 69. Comments? Questions?
  70. 70. Marketing to Americans Scottish Development International February 2014 Allyson Stewart-Allen StewartDirector International Marketing Partners Ltd. 148148-150 Buckingham Palace Road London SW1W 9TR Tel: +44 (0)20 7828 9400 E: allyson@intermarketingonline.com Twitter: @MuseofMarketing © International Marketing Partners Ltd. 70
  71. 71. Coming to America 2014 End of group sessions End of workshop for morning attendees Break for attendees of the afternoon workshop

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